Category Archives: African American

Songs and Bands Stand the Test of Time

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While driving in your car, especially here  in America, we have the

luxury of a radio, sometimes if a newer car, Syrius. I used to have

this feature and would program my ride somewhere with such fun

topics as “Coffee Shop” tunes or “Old Rock and Roll.” I was listening

to Casey Kasem’s “America’s Top 40” program on the radio. Rest in

peace, you good man! (Casey Kasem died in June, 2014, at age 82 of

sepsis.) I was struck by this comment, paraphrased since my mind is

not a recorder nor a computer:

 

“More than 23,000 songs were written and sung during the seventies

in the United States, only 370 were major grossing songs, (making

Top Ten lists). In this time period, only TWO were number one hits

written by a duo of song-writers.

I will come back, from the commercial to tell you who they were. . .”

 

Of course, I tried to memorize this comment, was an a red light and

jotted down the two numbers and waited ‘with bated breath’ for the

answer. Why the excitement in this upcoming response? You may not

know me well, but music is a special part of my life and the 70’s were

my stomping grounds, where music laid its foundation and made a

huge impact on my life.  I was in band from 4th grade on, played in

three bands in high school, marching band, symphonic band, pep

band for the basketball team and homecoming pep rallies, along with

the stepping stone to symphonic band: concert band. I loved the way

current songs on the radio made their way into our performances,

along with learning the meaning of different musical terms and the

way the music would build and pull on my heartstrings and soul,

during crescendo’s.

 

The two songs were “Loco-Motion” and “Go Away, Little Girl”

whose authors were Carole King and Gerry Goffin.

The first song has such an incredible legacy, along with being a

fun song. It is one of the only songs of all time, which has been

number one in three different decades sung by three different

styles or cultures. What a landmark song!

1. Little Eva, who is African American, sang the song, “Loco-Motion”

in 1962. This helped her career in singing really soar.

 

2. Grand Funk Railroad, (rock and roll, Caucasian band), sang it

in 1974 and put their own ‘brand’ on the song, “Loco-Motion.”

 

3. The Austrailan singer, Kylie Minogue, made this song go

international with her 1988 rendition.

Way to go, Carole King and Gerry Goffin for making this song

a catchy tune that went across generations and cultures.

 

The second song, this tremendous duo wrote, “Go Away, Little

Girl” was one of my favorites in my teenaged years. When I had

a crush on a senior in high school, Todd D. of Science Club and

marching band “fame,” I pictured Todd singing this to me, along

with meeting me by the Bay High Rockets’ goal posts in five years

after I graduated from high school. (I was only a mere freshman

when I had this ‘crush.’)

1. “Go Away, Little Girl” was first sung by Bobby Vee in ’62. Soon

to be followed and reaching higher sales, by Steve Lawrence later

the same year, in 1962. This made the Popular Top 20 list.

2. The Happenings sang and got this song into the top selling

songs in 1966. This was also a popular song with my friends.

3. The most popular version and more often played song, “Go Away

Little Girl” is sung by Donnie Osmond, 1971.

 

While listening to Casey Kasem, another time, I wrote down this

short note on a scrap of paper last Autumn.

The “most popular song played at funerals” is Frank Sinatra’s

popular top 10 song, “My Way.” I can imagine a lot of people who

would embrace this in their different life styles and endeavors but

had no idea that this was so beloved.

It would take years to ‘replace’ this song but a new hit being played

at funerals is from the British comedy movie, “Life of Brian.” Who

could imagine choosing a song from this movie? Well, I can tell

you one: my brother Randy still roars in laughter while watching

this Monty Python spoof movie, once a year with my family. I am

surprised though at this musical choice:

“Always Look on the Bright Side of Life,” by Eric Idle of Monty

Python wrote this as a reaction to “Give a Little Whistle” from

the Disney franchise of upbeat movies, “Pinocchio.”

 

I am sure Eric is laughing out loud should he find out how popular

this song has become over the years.  Somehow, I thought a more

popular song would be, “Taps” or “Amazing Grace.”

 

Frankly, I feel this is refreshing and would cheer me up to know

I don’t have to listen to “Candle in the Wind,” at Randy’s memorial

service, should I outlive him. This may irreverent comment, but

believe me, Randy would be amused at this song being played,

so ‘Always Look at the Bright Side of Life,” will be on the playlist,

brother. Oh, that reminds me, I will have to add one of the songs

from his other ‘favorite’ movie, “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?”

 

MORE MUSICAL NOTES:

 

The recent death of the Gospel legend, Andrae Crouch, requires a

respectful “note” and pause. At age 72, Andrae had influenced many

listeners with his heartfelt lyrics and soulful songs. Here are a few

which you may wish to check out:

“Let the Church Say Amen.”

“Soon and Very Soon.”

“Take Me Back.”

Along with being what many considered a fine singer and composer,

Andrae helped influence three legendary musicians. Although, he

may not have helped increase each of their popularity levels; he

undoubtedly changed their lives. This was the kind of man Andrae

Crouch was. The tributes and interviews all held warm memories

and kind thoughts of this man.

Michael Jackson was helped with his own song, “The Man in the

Mirror,” by Andrae Crouch’s adjusting its musical arrangement.

Elton John and Madonna received positive influences upon their

careers, by Gospel leader, Andrae Crouch.

 

 

The James Band was one of the alternative rock groups I sometimes

listened to in the 80’s. Do you have any memories of this different band?

Their roots came from Manchester, England. They took breaks in their

recording and individual careers. Some time off, as you may remember.

The first’break’ was a rather long one, after being popular in the 80’s

and leaving the musical scene in 2001;  they got back together in 2007.

Then, another 7 year time span ensued, until last year (2014).

While the members followed their individual pursuits, the James Band

still played on the alternative rock scene on the  radio, though.

Their sales over the years amount to over $25 million.

 

Imagine my surprise and pleasure to say the James Band are back

on the road and had a new album come out in June, 2014 titled,

“Le Petit Mort” including a popular new song, “Moving On.” This

is a solemn, questioning song, one which shows how aging and time

passing influences how you choose your path. James Band has

changed their sound and song choices.  The wisdom found while

growing older is reflected here in their music. The slow pace rises

and slowly builds into a crescendo, with trumpets and guitars

playing. Here are a few snippets of the lyrics I heard of this “new”

song, “Moving On,”

“Leave a little light on. . .”

“Will we recognize our friends when this cycle ends?”

“Will it start again?”

There are moments where time is like seeds being planted,

dreams taken for granted.

Welcome back, James Band!

 

Mick Jones poured out his long and winding road life’s path,

in an interview on the 12/28/14 CBS Sunday Morning show.

Mick’s path is one which encompasses being part of a British

“Spooky Tooth” band, playing with “C’est La Vie” and a French

man named Holliday. Mick Jones said Holliday forgives his

leaving the group to find his own way. Holliday was a “French

Elvis,” according to Jones. Then, Jones proceeded to get to the

‘meat’ of his musical career with “Foreigner.” Not being one

who studies musicians’ lives as they are progressing, I was very

interested in how Jone’s compelling journey went. I always liked

Foreigner’s  songs, “Feels Like the First Time,” “Head Games,”

and “I’ve Been Waiting for a Girl Like You.” When the group

‘went soft’ in one of the band member’s eyes, (or ears)- they parted

ways and the band split up back in 2003.

Mick Jones and Ian McDonald were inducted into the Songwriters’

Hall of Fame, June, 2013, with Elton John presenting them this

prestigious award. They have never made it into the Rock and Roll

Hall of Fame.

Foreigner was unique in its combination of three British and three

American band musicians and singers joining forces. The band’s

3 Brits were Mick Jones, Ian McDonald and Dennis Elliot, while

the 3 Americans were Lou Gramm, Al Greenwood and Ed Gagliardi.

 

Wow, this has been 12 years since then! Their music is still daily

‘in my ears’ on the radio. Foreigner is a group which has stood the

‘test of time,’  I believe. Only one member of the original band,

has passed away. Ed Gagliardi died in May, 2014.

All have not worked together since 1989. They have had a few varied

combinations of the players.

In 2013,  Mick Jones, Ian McDonald and Lou Gramm renewed their

ties and are working on a new collaboration. They were part of the

Summer of 2013 Tour, including Eagles’ Don Felder playing with

Foreigner and the band Styx.

 

What are some “musical notes” you have been listening to?

What musician or group do you feel has stayed the most ‘current’ ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are You Using Your Noggin?

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The week of March 10 – 14th, (2014) has a health concern

attached to it. This is Brain Awareness Week. I decided

that for our “Hump Day” we need to think and work a bit.

Here are some people who are putting their brains to good

use. They all have been working since 50 or more years ago.

Not only are they still considered very talented but they

have made major contributions to our world.

Queen Elizabeth II, 88 years old and has been ‘on the

job,’ since 1952. She became Queen at age 25 years old.

The lineage went through her father, King George VI. He

followed his brother, King Edward VIII, who abdicated the

throne in 1936.

The Rolling Stones have been ‘on the job’ since 1962.

Their great beginnings and their stone got to rolling,

was when they signed with Decca Records in 1963. The

first 45 they ‘cut’ was “Come On” and on the flip side

was, “I Want To Be Loved.” They have made rock n’ roll

to the ‘tune of’ 92 singles, 29 studio albums and 10

live albums.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 81 years old, has been a jurist

since 1959. Her first big job was as the second female

faculty member of Rutgers University Law School, 1963.

Way to go! Way to make an impact on society!

Here is a quote from R. B. Ginsberg,

“My mother told me to be a lady. And for her, that

meant be your own person, be independent.”

Placido Domingo, 73, has been singing in his tenor

voice, since 1957. He joined the Mexico National Opera.

He is also known for being a member of the “Three

Tenors,” which includes Luciano Pavarotti and Jose

Carreras.

Here is a quote from Placido Domingo:

“I won’t deprive myself of singing opera as long as my

voice follows.”

Warren Buffett, 83, is considered a ‘business magnate.’

He has been working since the age of 13 years old, when

he delivered newspapers. He also sold his own horse-

racing tip sheet, along with claiming his bicycle a $35

tax deduction! That’s using your ‘noodle,’ Mr. Buffett!

Warren Buffett was considered the world’s third richest

man and talk about ‘contributions:’ He plans to leave

his $44 billion dollars to charity!

Dr. Maya Angelou, 86 in April, is a notable author and

poet. She has been writing creatively since 1958. She

joined the Harlem Writers Guild at that time. Her book,

“I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” was a requirement for

one of my high school literature classes. Her poem,

“I Rise,” is considered a classic motivational poem. She

has written several books, one that claims, “I Still

Rise.” Dr. Angelou is considered a member of America’s

“Golden Renaissance.” She is the only poet to have read

at two presidents’ inaugurations, President Clinton and

President Obama.

I heard today, from a friend and coworker, that some

universities measure and test brain waves on ‘normal’

brains, sometimes paying participants for their time.

This helps them to have a base line, when Alzheimer’s

disease or other debilitating diseases which attack

and damage brain cells. Comparing your stable brain

waves to ones which have gone awry, may be very useful.

So, I could suggest you volunteer or look into this

in honor of Brain Awareness Week.

Here are my suggestions to show respect for brains.

Remind any young people to follow these ‘brain

guidelines,’ that I gathered together.

1. Please use your head!

2. Take care of your mind.

3. Don’t do drugs or alcohol, unless of age

and in moderation, please.

4. Stretch your brain daily.

5. Encourage everyone to use their imagination.

6. Always be careful while in a car and wear your

seatbelts. Make sure all passengers, “Buckle Up!”

7. Protect your body and head from injury.

8. Always wear your helmet, while on a motorcycle

or bicycle. If you do any other sports which require

helmets, consider them a necessity. (Examples: Snow

Boarding, Skate Boarding, 4-Wheeling, Football, …)

9. Pursue education, no matter what your age!

10. Set goals, strive for new ones when you meet the

ones you have met!

I like to stretch my brain by doing crossword puzzles.

As my parents did together, once they retired in their

fifties.

Just as an additional historical fact, the impact of

words such as, “A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste,”

comes from over thirty years of use. The United Negro

College Fund incorporated this catchy phrase in 1972.

I read a wide variety of materials, including posts

written by all of you, smart bloggers, out there!

Hope you enjoyed the half dozen Golden Oldies who are

still using their ‘noodles’ and the ten things you need

to do to keep your mind safe.

Twin Double Feature

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Are you old enough to have enjoyed going to the drive-in movies

and seeing a double feature? I won’t ask how many of you actually

watched the films! How appropriate to share two stories about the

Color of Green, today.

(Don’t forget to set your clocks ahead, “Spring ahead!” for

those of you that live in this part of the country!) I am

about to tell you two uplifting and refreshing stories about

the power of giving, helping and money.

Have you already heard about the man who gave away $1000?

This story has gone viral! It all started with a prankster,

named Magic of Rahat. He has a way of usually pranking his

friends and neighbors, capturing his antics on film. This

time, he decided to “pay it forward.” The wonderful result

is of a homeless man being given a lottery ticket. (There

was an arrangement made prior to this action.)

The homeless man in Virginia, goes into a convenience store,

handing it to the clerk. The ticket was not a winning ticket,

but the man behind the counter hands him $1000, telling him

that it is a winning ticket.

The homeless man’s reaction is “priceless.”

The homeless man cries, tries to share the money.

He says, “This right here is enough for me.”

Then he offers the rest to the convenience clerk.

He tells Magic of Rahat, (paraphrased),

“Nothing good like this has ever happened to me before.”

When he finds out Magic of Rahat has been the source of the

gift, the man having teary eyes adds more,

“I have never had a friend, had somebody do what you did.

Never.”

In this story, both the homeless man (the receiver) and the

gifter, were African American. This heartwarming story got

to me, earlier this week.

The second story, in this double dose of great tidings is

about caring and helpful teenagers. Imagine that! I heard

this wonderful act of kindness on ABC This Morning, Saturday

March 8, 2014. The next time someone is ‘picking on lazy

or thoughtless teens,’ think of this message!

In Lawton, Oklahoma a group of teenagers were walking along

a street. They heard someone’s faint, plaintive cries for

help. I am surprised that they could hear the sound. There

could have been some rowdiness, loudness and they would

have missed a man’s appeals. The two boys who decided to

stick around and ask the man what happened, were hearing

a voice from under a manhole!

They are average-looking boys, but are super heroes in my

book!

The man had seen a twenty dollar bill floating along in

water, slip down a storm drain pipe. He had somehow fit

himself into it, trying to follow the money. The man,

who was calling out, had been down there an estimated

two days! He was dehydrated and disoriented, as reported

by the newscasters. He had been shouting and trying to get

attention from passers-by for those two days and along

came the two young men.

The boys called “911” and told the operator that they

thought the man would need help out of his predicament,

along with an ambulance.

The desperate state of the man impressed the teens, they

looked at each other when it was over, the dazed man

being rushed to the hospital saying,

“Did we just save a man’s life?”

What an uplifting story and hopefully, a powerful impact

on their futures. These twin pair of stories show us

the goodness possible in humanity and how relationships

make a difference.

Here is a quotation that if stretched can include the

color green:

“The color within us can color the world around us.”

By Thomas Kinkade.

Nothing better on a Saturday morning, to begin the day

with good news, huh?

You can check out the end result of this story. Who the

man was and how he is doing online. The name and hospital

had not been released when I heard this story.

You may wish to include these fine young men, who I did

not hear the names of, in your thoughts (and/or prayers.)

I will hope that those teenagers continue

to realize what a difference they made…

by listening to someone who needed them to listen.

“Let’s Start at the Very Beginning”… of Seasonal Cards

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I love the first six words of this title, does anyone know why? It refers

to a famous song that has recently been remade by Carrie Underwood… I

will tell you the answer at the end of this post!

When Henry Cole, a London businessman decided to create the first Christmas

card, he is given credit for this undertaking in 1843. He originated this

card idea to his fellow business connections. Then, three years later,

it became a tradition or custom having spread itself around in big circles.

During English postal reform, 1846, this cost only one penny to send a

Christmas card to someone.

The very first card was commissioned by Henry Cole to the designer/artist,

John Calcott Horsley, of the Royal Academy of Arts (Fine Arts). There were

three panels on this first select card, two panels that held two of the

oldest Christmas traditions. These are also British in origin, “Feeding

the Hungry” and “Clothing the Needy.” In the middle of this tri-fold

card were the simple words, “A Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year to You.”

This message is still one of the most popular ones, on Christmas cards, of

all time. The Hallmark Historical Collection of Cards has only two copies

of the “First Christmas Card,” along with over 100,000 printed artifacts

from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

When researching this lovely subject, which gives me special memories of

different styles, I learned that the cards do reflect the current times.

During the Depression years, there were American flags and wishes or

hopes for “better times.” During the War Periods, the words “Across the

Miles” and “Missing You,” became quite popular.

During the more modern “Cold War times” there was an increase of sharpened

wit and a wider demand for more humorous Christmas cards.

Throughout all years, the most popular Christmas card of all time would

be one with angels or the Nativity scene. The Baby Jesus in a Manger is

a sight that means so much to the Christians that are celebrating the

birthday of the Son of God.

During the 1960’s and 1970’s the designs reflected the times again, with

Flower Children, Peace Symbols and the First Manned Moon Landing. The

creative artists worked the Christmas message into the designs. I seem

to remember during this period of time, my parents ordering their

Christmas cards from UNICEF. One particular card’s design had the Peace

dove with its olive branch and the words, “Peace on Earth” on the outside

and the enclosed message being: “Goodwill to Men. Happy New Year.”

In the early 1980’s, a surge for a new sports-oriented society drove the

card designers or artists to depict Santa in a jogging suit with running

shoes on. This was our “fitness craze” beginning! I remember the cards

that my parents received including a relaxed Santa and a reindeer on the

beach in an old-fashioned red longjohn looking bathing suit. Maybe my

memory is playing tricks on that one! Ha Ha! There have been cards with

such product placement as Coca Cola or Budweiser beers, maybe some

other countries had ales or liquor, as in a toast given to celebrate

the upcoming New Year. Of course, there are the popular children’s

cartoon characters and current animated movies that make it on the

annual Christmas cards being sent out.

There have also, throughout the television era, (which it is still

going on, right?) “spoofs” on the T.V. shows and commercials were

worked into the Christmas card department! With new innovations, and

different accessibilities being included, there are certainly Braille

Christmas and other holiday cards to be purchased. I know the man down

the hallway, David, told me he cherishes “hearing” from his blind friends

he made in the Columbus School for the Blind. He also appreciates his

family members who order these special cards. He has an orange cat who

likes to try to sneak into my apartment that I told David he reminds

me of Garfield! I asked him if he had any residual eyesight when he

was younger, he answered he loved Garfield in the Sunday comics

when he was in elementary school. He is “nearly blind” he says but

is able to tap his way around the apartment building using his cane

and has a woman who comes in to help him once a week, doing his

laundry and she (Linda) put up a Christmas tree for him. I peeked

in and told him when he gets a Braille card to please bring it

down, since I had struggled with that course while in the Master’s

program at OSU. (I have an A average but received a “C-” in this

course, due to not being able to go beyond Elementary level in

my typing Braille. That heavy typewriter and taking the tests

in Braille, was almost the “death of me!”

The various holidays celebrated around the world have been shown in our

Christmas cards. My cousin, Heather, married a Jewish man in the 90’s,

so from that point on, we sent both a Christian card and a Jewish one

celebrating Hanukkah. My parents also had friends, the Lezbergs, from

when I was in third grade through their retirement, who received the

general box of holiday card, that was before the Jewish individual

cards were bought for Jerry, Heather’s husband and then, one sent

to Dad’s good NASA friend, Herb, and his family. I am not sure if

there is a timeline for when Kwanzaa cards came into being, I did

not see this in the articles I read. I am sure there is a historical

reference somewhere for this!

I wonder, as some of my friends have recently discussed this subject,

will technology take away the fun and custom of sending Christmas

cards? I know you can send e-cards and email family newsletters.

There are also, “walls” on Facebook, where you can post a general

“Happy Holidays” or “Enjoy the Festivities!”

But, I hope and truly believe there will be some of us that will

still buy the boxes of Christmas cards, sit down and address them,

write a personal message, possibly write a family newsletter,

copy this off to send in numbers or like I do, write each family

a personal note on Christmas decorated stationery. Which I enclose

in each of the cards I send off with Christmas stamps and little

seasonal stickers sealing them closed. Do you know why it is worth

the effort? To me it is so special and I get teary-eyed to see

the letters and cards coming to me. I feel like I am having a

“visit” with them, different from the phone calls and the

hurried notes that sometimes get written on birthday and

Easter cards.

There is something “magical” about Christmas

cards, or is it my age?

What do you think about this age-old tradition? Is it

going “by the wayside?”

I will make one more appeal or declaration Why it should

not be discontinued, this holiday tradition has managed

to “weather the storms” of wars, economic hard times, and

social changes, including more cultural beliefs and

embracing the changes.

Oh, I almost forgot to tell you, those six words start the

song, “Do Re Mi” from “The Sound of Music!” I feel that

Carrie Underwood did a sweet, innocent portrayal of a

nun who falls for Captain Von Trapp. She sang every bit

as well as Julie Andrews and I know this is almost

“blasphemous,” but I enjoyed it better than any other

portrayal of Maria. This is also, a true story, which I

read while in elementary school and my Grandmother Mattson,

who came to America from Germany, encouraged me to read.

It is okay if you are on a totally opposite side from my

way of thinking or have a different take on this custom of

exchanging cards… Really, it is!

Let me know!

Hugs to All and no stamp needed!

Famed Author’s Home Up for Sale

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For a mere sum of $85,000, you can purchase the home of famed

playwright, poet and author, Langston Hughes. It has been recently

renovated but still has the beauty of an older home, including the

third floor attic garret, where Langston, in his high school years would

sleep, write and create. This is located in Cleveland, Ohio where the

area is being kept up like the old neighborhoods in Columbus, like

German Village or Victorian Village. These are the side streets that

people drive down to see Christmas lights on. The homey type of

neighborhood where you may be content or like Langston, may want

to flee from.

His home, at 2266 East 86th, was along the bus route to Central High

School and Karamu House, an internationally acclaimed centerpiece

of plays, dramatic arts and dance productions, featuring varied cultures

and backgrounds. This is known also as the “oldest African-American

theater in the United States.” This is where Langston Hughes would

premiere many of his plays.

Born James Mercer Langston Hughes in 1902 and passing away in1967,

Hughes contributed greatly to the writing community and especially,

helping the world to recognize the talents of African-Americans.

Although Hughes was well known for writing to represent his racial

background, he had Caucasian, African American and Native American

roots.

He was originally from Missouri, later in his junior high years moving to

live with his mother and stepfather in Cleveland, Ohio. This is where the

home is on sale.

Langston Hughes graduated from Central High School, honed some of

his creative writing skills at Karamu House. He then moved on to become

one of the first writers (innovators) to form what is considered the Harlem

Renaissance era (1920- 1930’s) in New York. His journals of short stories,

poems and social commentary began under the roof here in Cleveland.

Langston Hughes’ heritage was of two great-grandmothers who were

African-American slaves and two great-grandfathers who were Kentucky

land and slave owners. Hughes is known for the origin of writing a form

of poetry called, “jazz poetry.” He has a lovely lyrical and rhythmic style

that contributed to the annals of black poetry, being included in many

high school literature textbooks. Hughes was “ahead of his time,” in my

opinion. He had already died when I was exposed to his writing in the

70’s and our literature teacher had us reading his poetry aloud, so we

could listen to its lyrical “notes.”

This is how I came across his writing and was aware of Langston Hughes.

One of his more famous poems is titled,

“The Negro Speaks of Rivers

“My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young.

I danced in the Nile when I was old

I built my hut by the Congo and it lulled me to sleep.

I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it.

I heard the singing of the Mississippi and Abe Lincoln went

down to New Orleans, and I’ve seen the muddy bosom turn all

golden in the sunset.”

(1920)

Hughes attended one year of engineering school at Columbia, but dropped

out. He felt the weight of prejudice upon him and his true calling of writing

pulling him away from his studies.

Here is a beautiful example of Hughes’ poems:

“The night is beautiful

So the faces of my people.

The stars are beautiful,

So the eyes of my people.

Beautiful, also, is the sun

Beautiful, also, are the souls of my people.”

From the poem, “My People,” (1923).

The realtor, Sherry M. Callahan, said there has been an offer or bid on the

house, from an aspiring writer who may be hoping to have inspiration come

from the walls of this author’s home. There is a nice fireplace to sit by, write

and soak in the ambiance. It could be claimed by a historical group or a

person seeking to have a tour stop for visitors to Cleveland, too.

This house includes a “page out of literary history,” Sherry noted.

Do you need a place to find your “muse?”