Category Archives: Brain Awareness Week

Are You Using Your Noggin?

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The week of March 10 – 14th, (2014) has a health concern

attached to it. This is Brain Awareness Week. I decided

that for our “Hump Day” we need to think and work a bit.

Here are some people who are putting their brains to good

use. They all have been working since 50 or more years ago.

Not only are they still considered very talented but they

have made major contributions to our world.

Queen Elizabeth II, 88 years old and has been ‘on the

job,’ since 1952. She became Queen at age 25 years old.

The lineage went through her father, King George VI. He

followed his brother, King Edward VIII, who abdicated the

throne in 1936.

The Rolling Stones have been ‘on the job’ since 1962.

Their great beginnings and their stone got to rolling,

was when they signed with Decca Records in 1963. The

first 45 they ‘cut’ was “Come On” and on the flip side

was, “I Want To Be Loved.” They have made rock n’ roll

to the ‘tune of’ 92 singles, 29 studio albums and 10

live albums.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 81 years old, has been a jurist

since 1959. Her first big job was as the second female

faculty member of Rutgers University Law School, 1963.

Way to go! Way to make an impact on society!

Here is a quote from R. B. Ginsberg,

“My mother told me to be a lady. And for her, that

meant be your own person, be independent.”

Placido Domingo, 73, has been singing in his tenor

voice, since 1957. He joined the Mexico National Opera.

He is also known for being a member of the “Three

Tenors,” which includes Luciano Pavarotti and Jose

Carreras.

Here is a quote from Placido Domingo:

“I won’t deprive myself of singing opera as long as my

voice follows.”

Warren Buffett, 83, is considered a ‘business magnate.’

He has been working since the age of 13 years old, when

he delivered newspapers. He also sold his own horse-

racing tip sheet, along with claiming his bicycle a $35

tax deduction! That’s using your ‘noodle,’ Mr. Buffett!

Warren Buffett was considered the world’s third richest

man and talk about ‘contributions:’ He plans to leave

his $44 billion dollars to charity!

Dr. Maya Angelou, 86 in April, is a notable author and

poet. She has been writing creatively since 1958. She

joined the Harlem Writers Guild at that time. Her book,

“I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” was a requirement for

one of my high school literature classes. Her poem,

“I Rise,” is considered a classic motivational poem. She

has written several books, one that claims, “I Still

Rise.” Dr. Angelou is considered a member of America’s

“Golden Renaissance.” She is the only poet to have read

at two presidents’ inaugurations, President Clinton and

President Obama.

I heard today, from a friend and coworker, that some

universities measure and test brain waves on ‘normal’

brains, sometimes paying participants for their time.

This helps them to have a base line, when Alzheimer’s

disease or other debilitating diseases which attack

and damage brain cells. Comparing your stable brain

waves to ones which have gone awry, may be very useful.

So, I could suggest you volunteer or look into this

in honor of Brain Awareness Week.

Here are my suggestions to show respect for brains.

Remind any young people to follow these ‘brain

guidelines,’ that I gathered together.

1. Please use your head!

2. Take care of your mind.

3. Don’t do drugs or alcohol, unless of age

and in moderation, please.

4. Stretch your brain daily.

5. Encourage everyone to use their imagination.

6. Always be careful while in a car and wear your

seatbelts. Make sure all passengers, “Buckle Up!”

7. Protect your body and head from injury.

8. Always wear your helmet, while on a motorcycle

or bicycle. If you do any other sports which require

helmets, consider them a necessity. (Examples: Snow

Boarding, Skate Boarding, 4-Wheeling, Football, …)

9. Pursue education, no matter what your age!

10. Set goals, strive for new ones when you meet the

ones you have met!

I like to stretch my brain by doing crossword puzzles.

As my parents did together, once they retired in their

fifties.

Just as an additional historical fact, the impact of

words such as, “A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste,”

comes from over thirty years of use. The United Negro

College Fund incorporated this catchy phrase in 1972.

I read a wide variety of materials, including posts

written by all of you, smart bloggers, out there!

Hope you enjoyed the half dozen Golden Oldies who are

still using their ‘noodles’ and the ten things you need

to do to keep your mind safe.