Category Archives: festival

Native American View on “Two-Spirits”

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An article by Cecelia LaPointe, who refers to “Two-Spirit”

which addresses and rekindles awareness of Native Gender

identity, was in the Ohio “Outlook” magazine. This was my

resource which I used finding great Christmas music lists

and an article about Bette Midler in December.

 

In November, Cecelia came to OSU campus to host a poetry

workshop and speak on racial identity and the “Two-Spirit”

existence. Ms. LaPointe has also visited Columbus during

both Native American Heritage Month and Trans-gender

Awareness Week. (Two opportunities I missed last year to

feature in my monthly calendar.)

 

Indigenous communities of Native Americans use the “Two-

Spirit” label to denote gender variations within their people.

In the world, they consider Europe and American cultures

“binary” genders. “Two-Spirits” become a third or even fourth

gender among native societies.

 

“Two-Spirits” are denoted or designated from birth, through

a ritual. This belief of a person embodying masculine and

feminine spirits, two ‘identities inhabiting a single body’ is

not considered ‘weird,’ ‘strange’ or ‘inappropriate.’ Instead

the Native Americans ’embrace’ the different way of life.

 

Two things mentioned in this essay about Cecelia and her

tribe’s belief in what sets these particular people known as

“Two-Spirits” apart:

1.) They dress and change their choice of who they are from

day to day. They are not all ‘one way’ in their feminine or

masculine clothing.

2.) They may choose to carry out tasks or labor, not dependent

on their outward appearance. Gender roles are not delineated

or dictated in the “Two-Spirit” existence.

For example: A person could go out on a hunt or go to war, but

at other times may dress in women’s clothing and carry out

domestic chores. Women could become  ‘warriors’ or chiefs

over their native tribes.

 

Interestingly, according to Ms. LaPointe,  “Two-Spirits” were

not only tolerated, but they were ‘revered.’  For instance, they

were well respected and considered, ‘powerful.’ They often were

given special roles such as healers, mediators and counselors.

 

There are instances where bigotry of “Two-Spirits” has been

carried out. When historians bring up the arguments of their

contributions and respected positions it is to counterbalance

those who say Native Americans are “transphobic.”

 

Sometimes, Natives would bring up “tradition” as a reason to

exclude people who chose to carry out their ‘birthright’ as

“Two-Spirit” people.  They would be acting close-minded to

the long history of the revered members of their tribes.

Ancestors of Native Americans were not against “Two-Spirit”

people, elders were often of this delineation.

 

Ms. LaPointe brings up Spanish missionaries as those who

planted the ‘bad seeds’ which germinated prejudice against

“Two-Spirited” people. “They (Two-Spirit) were essentially

the first victim in the campaign of colonial violence against

the native population of the Americas.”

 

Ms. LaPointe considers herself of  ‘mixed descent’ and feels

she is part of “both cultures, both worlds.” She grew up in a

Detroit suburb and lives in the northern town of Manistee.

She travels to her reservation in the U.P. (Upper Peninsula)

regularly. She is a descendant of the Anishinaabekwe Tribe,

native of the Great Lakes region.

 

Cecelia LaPointe says her reservation is very small yet it is her

“home.” This is where she goes to be with family members. Some

of her own family members hold leadership positions within her

tribe. It is part of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community. Being

located far from the city means it is a positive place for her to

retreat. It is also good since. . .

‘There is less influence from the dominant culture there.’

 

Ms. LaPointe reaches out to others, through her writing

and public speaking. By going to college campuses, she

can share her poetry and also, her viewpoint where the

students may be encouraged to be ‘themselves.’ She hopes

to reverse the history of discrimination against both the

Native Americans and also, those who are filled with what

they call, “Two-Spirit.”

 

There was a wonderful piece of artwork that accompanied

this article in “Outlook,” November issue. It has the artist,

George Catlin’s (1796-1872) painting called, “Dance to the

Berdache.” This was drawn while the Sac and Fox people

of the Great Plains were engaging in a ceremonial dance to

celebrate the “Two-Spirit” person.

 

Here is a part of a poem that talks of her emotions,

“Poem: Ajijaak Dodem Anokil

It is so precious,

Those tears on my hands,

Covering my face,

This grieving is beautiful,

You see we had felt those knives turned inward

On ourselves,

On our family. . .”

 

You may wish to check out Cecelia Rose LaPointe’s poetry

or speaking schedule and other special events at:

http://www.anishinaabekwe.com

 

My youngest daughter and I recently saw, “The Imitation Game,”

which depicts an underlying sadness within the main character.

It is a true story about Alan Turing, a genius. He was the inventor

of a de-coding machine that ‘beat’ Germany’s war coding machine,

“The Enigma.” This British machine helped the Allies win World

War II against the Germans.

 

Apparently, Alan Turing was a man who faced accusations and

there were parts of the film which eluded to his sexual preferences.

This movie brought up the problems that people historically have

faced (and are still overcoming).  The end of the movie has details

about large numbers, unfortunately, of people who were thrown in

British prisons, due to their homosexuality.

 

The actor is one I enjoy as “Sherlock” on PBS and also, has been

in the “Dr. Who” British television series. His name is Benedict

Cumberbatch. You can see him in more than one 2013 Academy

Award nominated movie, since he played in “12 Years a Slave”

and “August: Osage County.”

 

The woman who befriends him and who is very talented in

decoding and helping with the Turing Machine, is played by the

wonderful actress, Keira Knightley. My favorite role she has

played was in, “Pride and Prejudice,” but there are many more

films to see her in.

 

After the movie, when I talked with my youngest daughter who had

cried (as I did, too) during some of the tender and intense parts of the

film, we both agreed upon deep emotions we have in common.

We also share values my parents and siblings embrace.

It is hard to understand why anyone would be so offended by

someone’s personal choices.

 

Sadly, the United States has had many different areas where

numbers of people who chose to be ‘different’ from what some

may perceive as ‘normal’ or ‘mainstream.’ Obviously, numerous

people are still either bullied or face judges in court rooms.

 

Persecutions in the United States have been appalling and we

talked about our abhorrence of this.

 

No country is totally ‘innocent’ of negative practices of prejudice

and persecution. “Racial profiling” has been a problem within our

extended family.  (My oldest daughter’s father of little Micah is

bi-racial. Mainly, since 9/11/2001, he has had taunts and threats

due to his outward appearance. In his younger years, he says at

least in Delaware, Ohio, he found people wanting to be his friend

throughout his schooling and working years.)

 

The numbers of those imprisoned, at the end of the movie, were

such that we just shook our head and looked at each other through

teary eyes, in disbelief. Felicia asked me, “How can anyone feel

they have the right to judge someone else?”

 

This article about Native Americans and “Two Spirit” individuals

was saved in my WordPress drafts.  It helped me to feel that there

is a positive force to include gays and lesbians within the Native

tribes. Their ‘explanation’ or interesting philosophy towards people

who choose to follow two different genders created new thoughts

in my mind. Mother Nature has some unique qualities which I

embrace, sometimes intuitively.

 

Of course, I have mentioned before. . . I have hope for our future

in the possibility that all peoples can accept and embrace our

differences.

 

Written in Memoriam of Alan Turing, scientist, original computer

inventor and mathematician who committed suicide at age 41, a

few weeks before his 42nd birthday in  June, 1954.

Queen Elizabeth II gave Alan Turing a post-humous “pardon” in

2013 for his criminal charges and offenses.

 

October’s Bewitching Month

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In a book called, “Brownie Year Book,” written and illustrated by Palmer Cox, he

gives us twelve poems for a year.  This was found in an old anthology book, which

was published in the year of my birth, 1955. I have not featured the other months,

but may in the coming year, 2015.  It includes amusing, detailed pen and ink drawings

of these little ‘Brownies.’  They are not elf-like nor imps.  They are not younger

versions of Girl Scouts either. They look like little men. You may find these curious

characters on the Internet. Go ahead, check what the ‘Brownies’ look like. Otherwise,

I like the power and intricacy of words and will try to draw a picture in your mind of

them.  Their eyes are sometimes bugging out of their sockets.  In the wacky month

of June, the Brownies are banding together to go on a gentle ride in a boat along a

lazy stream. Alas, they reach a sudden increase of speed. Soon, they are falling out of

their boat going down a waterfall!  Chaos and amusement can be found in each month’s

transitions. The ‘Brownies’ are an unexpected pleasure like some kind of dwarves in

their own little adventures. I think they could compare to the movie, “The Box Trolls,”

in their antics. There can be some ‘episodes’ of serious intent as this October shows:

 

“October

When woods are tinged

with all the glow

October on the woods

can throw,

And game is plenty

on the tree

And every kind

of weapon free:

The Brownies

imitate the way

Mankind does creep

upon the prey.”

(Palmer Cox)

 

 

 

OCTOBER CALENDAR

 

Birthstone: Opal

Flower: Calendula

 

You should be filling out your absentee ballots applications, if you won’t be able to

make it to the polls. One month until elections are here in the U.S. in November.

It will land on Tuesday, November 4, 2014. My Mom and my youngest daughter

sometimes vote using absentee ballots. I sent out a text to one, a hand-written

letter to the other.  Not sure if this will be true this year or if they will make it to

the Polls!

 

Late October, exciting times are coming: The 110th World Series of Major League

Baseball Championship games keep on going with round #7 playing on October 29th.

 

October 1st-

Remembering 10/1/64 when over 3000 University of California Berkeley, gathered

in protesting Civil Rights activist, Jack Weinberg being arrested, surrounding the

police car. Mario Salvo and other activists had formed the organization of FSM,

(Freedom of Speech Movement.) It was not necessarily just for African Americans,

as there were many Spanish speaking members, along with whites, including Jewish

people. This incident lasted over 32 hours and ended peacefully.

 

1- Quarter Moon.

 

3-4- Yom Kippur.

From sundown on October 3rd until sunset on October 4th.

 

7- Children’s Health Day

Support mothers and fathers who protect their children by keeping their vaccinations

and shot records current. I support our local health clinic in Delaware, Ohio by donating

to their funding.

 

8- Hunters’ Full Moon

In October, Native Americans also call this Dying Moon and Travel Moon.

 

9- Leif Erickson Day.

Leif Erickson was believed to be the first (recorded) Nordic explorer of North America.

His Viking ship and members of his crew are shown appreciation on this day. If you

wish to see a humorous interpretation that explains this to children, see Leif Erickson

on Google, then add “SpongeBob SquarePants.”

 

13- Columbus Day.

Celebrating the ‘discovery’ of America, by Christopher Columbus.

Fly flags for honoring Veterans as this is a government holiday in the U.S.

 

15- Last Quarter Moon.

 

17- Alaska Day (observed).

The U.S. officially got the territory of Alaska from Russia transferred on the

date: October 18, 1867.

 

18- Two very different kinds of television programming going on:

1.  Stephen King’s movie, “Big Driver,” will be shown on Lifetime on this evening.

2.  “My Boyfriend’s Dogs,” will be shown on Hallmark Channel tonight. The

actress, Ericka Christensen is known for her role on the show, “Parenthood.”

 

 

 

23- New Moon (rising)

 

24- United Nations Day.

If you have never looked at all the lovely designs for different stationery, you

may wish to check out the UNICEF website. My parents ordered their Christmas

cards every year around this time. My father’s obituary had two donation places

designated in ‘lieu of flowers,’ as UNICEF and the Hospice organization in Cleveland,

Ohio. Mark Chagall’s lovely designs and the iconic Peace dove with the twig of an

olive branch were some of my favorite cards ever.

 

30- Hallmark Channel presents the American Humane Society Dog Show and

will include: 8 Hero Dogs competing for a national title. Watch these unsung

canine heroes on Hallmark Channel at 8:00 p.m. (EST).

 

31- Happy Halloween Day!

The evening before All Saints Day was once designated as “hallowed evening.”

All kinds of spirits will be roaming neighborhoods, mainly children dressed

up in costumes. Beware! If you don’t offer treats, you may have some ‘devilish’

tricks or pranks played on you or your house. . .

 

Also, a very special celebration will be going on in Nevada!

Happy 150th Anniversary to Nevada’s Statehood! There will be no schools

and all government offices closed on this Friday. Then on Saturday,

November 1st, there will be major hoopla going on, starting with a huge

parade! Congratulations for all those living in Nevada and Enjoy!

 

 

In Autumn, I enjoy going for a drive in the country, stopping and having a

hike in the woods. This is one simple pleasure that almost anyone, except

an invalid or someone bedridden can partake in. I hope you are healthy,

will enjoy the way your senses can all come into play, while enjoying the

great outdoors.

 

“The Open Road

Afoot and light-hearted,  I take to the open road.

Healthy, free, the world before me,

The long brown path before me, leading

wherever I choose.

 

Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself

am good-fortuned.

Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone

no more, need nothing.

Done with indoor complaints, libraries,

querulous criticisms,

Strong and content, I travel the open road.”

(Walt Whitman)

 

 

 

September Days

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“As we turn the pages of time,

We discover hidden mysteries

And triumphs in each new chapter.”

Flavia, (2003)

 

It is so hard to believe we have turned another page in our 2014 calendar

to  nearly 3/4 of the year having passed on by. The ninth month is upon us,

for some of us in this revolving world who measure months as the U.S and

other countries do in 12 month increments.

I am always amazed at how much time really does fly.  Who could truly

understand and envision this concept , while young? I think so many authors

have featured this in their themes. It is true that we never realize until we get

older, we cannot stop the way it seems to speed ahead. No matter how many

times we are reminded to concentrate and told to live in the moment.

 

When I watched the beginning of a recent episode of “The Talk,” I was rather

surprised when they mentioned an example of how we all make mistakes.

One huge decision that Cher fought with Sonny over was the song, “I’ve Got

You Babe.” She did not like it!

Later, Cher fought with her advisor/manager over the song, If I Could Turn

Back Time.” Can you imagine what impact losing both of these songs would

not only mean on Cher’s career, but on our lives? I cannot ever think about

time marching forward relentlessly without pondering the song and its

powerful message of turning back time. That is how connected both of those

things are, songs and memories.

Turning back time, wishing to go back may remind you of the movie,

“Back to the Future” also. That iconic movie, with Christopher Lloyd and

Michael J. Fox are sure part of my personal ‘time machine.’

 

Moving ahead, reluctantly, into September now. . .

 

SEPTEMBER  2014

Birthstone: Sapphire           Flower: Aster

 

This is Yoga Awareness Month!

 

September 1-

Labor Day

Suggested by the veterans, fly your flag today for workers everywhere.

 

2-

First quarter moon.

a sliver or crescent moon

 

6- Family camping for Boy Scouts

Picture my oldest daughter, my two grandsons, their ‘tribe’ out towards

Newark, my helping by transporting tent, camping gear and spending

the day with them. Possibly persuaded to sleep over, but unsure since

tomorrow is…

 

7- National Grandparents Day

All Horse Parade, Delaware, Ohio

 

9- September’s Full Moon

Known as either,

Full Corn Moon or

Full Harvest Moon.

Also,

“Admission Day” in California.

 

11-

This is 13 years since 9/11/01.

Patriot Day.

We honor those who died and give tribute to those living who have

suffered due to loss, having lung and other health issues and those

who worked, tirelessly, sifting through the rubble to find bodies.

I will never forget the images, nor will those who were watching.

Later that same month, Herman’s Hermits came to the Delaware

County Fair. I loved and got tears when they took their traditional

British Flag off the stage and replaced it with the American flag.

Herman made a short and poignant speech, that we were all in this

together and their hearts were aching with ours. They also said to

sing and celebrate together, as those who go to ‘wakes’ do, and we all

embraced the nostalgic music carried over the waves into our hearts.

By the way, it brought me smiles to see women who had brought roses

to give to Herman’s Hermits. Nice memory and kind words spoken,

during a critical and serious time.

 

Delaware County Fair, 2014 runs from September 13- 20. Our part of

the Triple Crown of Harness Racing, the Little Brown Jugette will be

held on September 17 th and the Little Brown Jug will be held on Sept.

18th.

 

16- Independence Day, Mexico.

Ole! Mexico!

17- I like to feature different areas of fifty year’s celebrations. On this day,

9/17/64, the first “Bewitched” television show was shown on television.

The character, male lead, “Darren” was played by Dick York, but later,

Dick Sargent was the actor who took over the role. The female character,

a mother, wife and witch is played by Elizabeth Montgomery as “Samantha.”

The part that I enjoyed was how playful and interactive the cast was, which

included fathers, mothers and mother in law, “Endora.” The child, “Tabitha,”

when born was one of my favorite memories of this show that ran from 1964

until 1972.

 

19- POW/MIA  Recognition Day.

Remembering all those who were lost, held captive, some tortured or giving

their lives for their country. This is a day we may pray for their families and

ancestors. All who were ultimately changed in their course of time.

 

20- International Day of Peace.

The United Nations declared this and I hope that fighting will stop, at least

on this day for calm and Peace around the World.

 

23-

First Day of Autumn or Fall.

I love to get my bittersweet and pumpkin decorations out, draping some

fall colors over places, along with changing over my wardrobe from summer

to fall.

 

24- New Moon.

At sundown, Rosh Hashanah begins through September 26th.

This is considered the Jewish New Year. It celebrates Adam and

Eve, in the Bible story.

 

26- The 28th Annual Ryder Cup Championships.

Golfing enthusiast will be watching this at the PGA Centenary Course. The

professional golfers will be staying in the Gleneagle Hotel, Perthshire, Scotland.

One of the mornings, I am sure, will have the gorgeous mist and fog rising off

the damp grass on the Greens, which will evoke the image of the foggy moors.

 

28-

On this Sunday, we celebrate our being a good neighbor. Help out someone who

may need an extra set of hands, or just be neighborly, offer them some homemade

baked goods or fresh fruit!

 

My September Monthly Book Suggestion:

(In the past, I featured children’s books, which you may find in my 2013 posts.)

 

“Fierce Patriot: The Tangled Lives of William Tecumseh Sherman”

by Robert O’Connell, Random House, 432 pages.

This September makes the 150th anniversary of General William Tecumseh

Sherman’s critical capture of Atlanta during the Civil War. The biography of

this much “celebrated” legendary general is well written. The memorable

march to the sea and later the takeover of Savannah were key strategies. His

personal life, with its complications and character struggles are very intriguing.

It is always fascinating to read about historic events and get a personal slant,

from the writer’s perspective of those times. The role of general and soldier who

later became a statesman is another facet to read about in this book.

 

Here are some quotations to close this month of September off:

“Home is the place that’ll catch you when you fall.

And we all fall.”  (Billie Letts.)

 

“To build a sense of trust takes risks.

You’ll never know whether the rope will hold,

Unless you take hold of it. . .

And swing out over the water.”

(Thomas Kinkade)

 

 

 

 

World Views

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When people give me a film recommendation, I take this with a ‘grain of

salt.’ There are so many different interests, particular patterns to people’s

choices in what they choose to watch. This is true of television, movies,

theater, music and cultural events. There are some universal choices that

almost everyone enjoys once in awhile. International movies, where the

cinematography and images are breath-taking and fantastic, are ones that

I am thrilled to receive from someone I admire and pass on to others, too.

My friend, Beth, who writes about all kinds of international subjects,

along with her home town of Ann Arbor, Michigan and her little ones

that she teaches, included “Vivan Las Antiopodes” as one of her posts.

Here is her blog:

http://ididnthavemyglasseson.com

We have some kindred sisterhood, which I admit I have been close to

several other bloggers along the way, with similar tastes and interests.

Beth has a reason for her interest in Australia and grandchildren, yet

even I am sometimes surprised at such details as liking the same kind

of ice cream that we have connections beyond what I generally find in

my community and home town.

So, to get this movie, I had to mention my interest to the librarian,

who got online to seek whether it was located in our own library or

a part of our district library in Delaware County. Nope! It was from

Greene County, Ohio, the town of Xenia, where this film was sent for.

I watched it and took notes. I then re-watched it while eating dinner

the next night. It is awesome, beyond description in its simple theme

of how across the world, we are all similar. It is complex, in its terrains

and cultural differences. These four cities, chosen because they are

exactly diametrically opposed on the globe, are called, “antipodes.”

If you watch this, the picture gradually slants from the one place to

glide effortlessly, circuitously into the other one. It is hard to explain

but it shows the world on its axis, so to speak, literally turning from

the one location to the next. The dizzying effect is exhilarating!

 

Then it is philosophical, here in my own words, I try to explain the

effect this film had upon me:

 

“We are all mankind.

Look at us, trying to eke out existence where there are few resources.

This is for the desert and sparse land where hardly any green exists.

Where there are miles between homes, across divergent tundras of land.

Trying to make our way among a crowded city, winding between others,

taking care not to enter the personal spaces, but sometimes colliding.”

 

I felt the movie has themes that are universal, no need to try to interpret

or have the languages translated. Why worry about the subtexts? Just

watch this movie for all the reasons Beth mentioned, along with this

short summary of textures I tried to capture in words. There are so many

dimensions, you will see this if you check out Beth’s post on this, too.

 

Swans

Birds

Giraffes

Farmers

Workers

Shearers

Sheep

 

Joy

Dances

Ukulele

Expressions

Discordant tones

Musical instruments

Melodic chants

Staccato “coos”

Dissonant

Calm

 

Round

and

Round

 

Sparse

Simple

Solidarity

Separate

Solitude

 

Fluid

Flows

Frost

Foliage

Fields

 

Round

and

Round

 

Carts

Riders

Walkers

Bicyclists

Complicated

Intertwining

Rickshaw

Vehicles

Trucks

Cars

 

Stark

Rocky

Barren

Beauty

Splendor

Horizons

Grassy

Beach

Lush

 

Men

Women

Diversity

Young

Old

 

 

 

 

Celebrating Kool-Aid in Nebraska

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In 1927, Edwin Perkins created the powdered flavored drink mix known as

Kool-Aid. It is now produced by Kraft Foods Company. The second weekend

of August, the town of Hastings, Nebraska celebrates its seventeenth year of

Aid Days.” The Festival has what is called “The World’s Largest Kool-Aid”

stand there. This is where you may pick up a free dated, reusable memorabilia

Souvenir Cup. This is refillable all day. You may also, purchase collectibles for

the 2014 event, online now.

There are all kinds of activities, fun things to do, a fair atmosphere with plenty

of food concession stands to celebrate Kool-Aid’s invention.

I liked using Kool-Aid for lunches, during the years I was a ‘stay at home/baby-

sitting’ Mom. I would always serve juice and milk for breakfast. Then, I would

serve milk again for my three kids, at dinner-time.

If there was anyone who brought something else to drink or share a beverage,

we would enjoy this variation. Occasionally, there were mothers who would

supply ‘juice boxes’ or jugs of lemonade, for our swimming pool outings, to save

money at the Mingo Pool Snack Bar. I would bring 8-10 snack baggies for all

the kids, including my 3.  There was always the drinking fountain, if thirsty.

I liked while growing up, visiting my neighbors or on overnight stays at  a

friend’s house, where Kool-Aid was served. To the best of my knowledge, we

never had any served at home. My parents were rather strict: water, milk or

juice, except on weekends. We would then have one bottle of Cotton Club

pop, with our pizza on Friday or our dinner on Saturday. Then, back to the

‘routine’ of drinking milk, juice or water on Sunday.

While traveling, my parents would bring instant coffee and Tang, the orange

juice concentrated powdered drink, along. My Dad liked to remind us that,

“Tang was what the astronauts drank up in Space!” We would have those little

boxes of cereal, that came in 8 or 10 packs, eating a box ‘dry’ with a cup of

Tang juice for breakfast. My parents would use the hot water from the tap

and make their instant coffee. We were used to this, our only special kind

of breakfast would be one time the whole week of vacation, we would head

to IHOP. We loved the International House of Pancakes! My co-workers

and I mentioned that there were so many of them, down South, less up

here in the North. I always chose this erudite dish of lemon butter crepes.

My brother, Randy, would have a stack of pancakes with boysenberry sauce,

while my brother, Ricky, would have eggs, bacon and toast with lots of butter

on it. My Dad was a fan of having every kind of food available for breakfast,

steak, eggs, pancakes or French toast, with grits and gravy on the side. My

Mom liked the crepes suzette with boysenberry or blueberry on it, with bacon.

I have wandered off Kool-Aid, but am meandering back. While on road trips,

my kids today bring those different instant single use packets that you add to

bottled water. They don’t make Kool-Aid nor do they usually serve sugared

juices, unless they are 100% juice, which is naturally sweetened. They serve

milk at 2-3 of the meals my grandchildren eat, although one of my little ones

has a lactose allergy and she gets almond milk, unsweetened with her meals.

 

As I am typing this, I think about those Kool-Aid packs in multiple colors

and flavors, “Just add one cup of sugar…” and it is ‘just pennies per serving.’

The song that they should play at the opening of the Kool-Aid Days Festival

should be, “Sugar, Sugar” by the Archies, from 1969!

 

Now, I cannot go any farther without asking, how many of you read,

“The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test,” book? This was written in 1968 by

Tom Wolfe.

How many of you used Kool-Aid to dye your hair?

What are your Kool-Aid memories?