Category Archives: Happy St. Patrick’s Day

March to Your Own Drummer

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As a child you may have made wooly lambs and snarling lions to

represent the calm way we wish to exit the month of March and

the wild, windy month we usually start with. I remember using

a large paper plate and cutting out eyes and gluing cotton balls

all over the plate for a lamb. I also remember having made a form

for my preschool students, the shape of a lamb out of brown or

tan construction paper. They loved using the glue and adding the

cotton balls that ultimately got stuck to their fingers, clothes and

everywhere except where they ‘belonged.’

Making lambs and lions with children, as an artistic endeavor,

spurs my desire to share Vincent Van Gogh’s thought:

“Great things do not just happen by impulse but as a succession

of small things linked together.”

Did you know Vincent Van Gogh lived a short and productive

life of only 37 years? He shared and created beauty through his

post- Impressionistic paintbrush strokes. You may wish to check

out this trio of sweet Spring flowering paintings. Van Gogh did

these in his final three years of his short life.

1.  “Cherry Tree,” (1888).

2.  “View of Arles, Flowering Orchards, (1889).

3.  “Almond Blossoms, (1890).

Hope this may inspire you to dabble with paint, chalk, crayons

or start a craft project.

Let’s hope the month starts as a roaring Lion and leaves as a

peaceful Lamb.

Here is a word from Thomas Kinkade, (2001):

“Prayer or simple meditation will nurture your spiritual connection

vital to evolving a focus that is truly personal and intrinsic to

your life.”

MARCH

Gemstone: Aquamarine

Flower: Jonquils

March 1st-

Sunday of Orthodoxy.

There is a complicated explanation about the meaning of this Sunday.

It meant that there was a movement or change among some faiths,

where icons or representations of various important elements could

be produced. This was in the 700’s, Jesus Christ and Mother Mary,

for examples could be depicted through artwork. This is considered

the first Sunday of Lent, 2015.

2nd-

Texas Independence Day.

Would it qualify for celebrating if I had some chocolate Texas sheet cake?

3rd- Town Meeting Day

Vermont likes to have their town meetings.

4- (Sundown) Purim begins. This lasts two days and ends on March

6th. This Jewish holiday celebrates the deliverance of the Jewish

people into the Persian Empire, saving them from a plot to kill

them. This day is one which includes feasting and rejoicing.

5-

Full Worm Moon-

“Add compost to your soil to invite beneficial earthworms into your

garden.”

(2015’s “Old Farmer’s Almanac.)

To make compost, we used to use the parings of our potatoes, fruits

and vegetables. These days, you consume so much of these, so scraps

of the rinds, stems and inedible parts of your food can be put into a

raised garden. You can till it from time to time, creating a rich place

for worms to thrive.

8- Daylight Savings Time (2:00 a.m.)

“Spring ahead. Fall behind.” This little saying helps me remember

the direction of setting my clocks each Spring and Autumn.

I think many of us will be joyous once the season gets warmer. I

hope this will be a season of renewal and ignite new passions and

interests.

“As we turn the pages of time,

we discover hidden mysteries

and triumphs in each chapter.”

(Flavia, 2003).

9- Commonwealth Day in Canada.

Friday the 13th- 2nd one ‘down,’ only one more to go this year.

This is not a big deal to most, except the superstitious ones.

15- Andrew Jackson Day (Tennessee)

17- Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

“Place stems of fresh white carnations into water with green food

coloring to dye the flowers green.” (2015’s “Old Farmer’s Almanac.”)

Do you pinch people who don’t wear green today?

Did you know the Episcopalians usually wear orange today?

Also, on the 17th- Evacuation Day (Suffolk Co., Mass.)

19- St. Joseph’s Day

“If it’s on St. Joseph’s Day clear,

So follows a fertile year.”

(Country  saying or Folklore)

20- New Moon

Vernal Equinox

Spring Begins.

“The fiddlehead, which looks like the tuning end of a fiddle

is the top of a young ostrich fern, tightly curled and sheathed

in a brown coating.”

2015’s “Old Farmer’s Almanac” uses ferns in March’s report.

29- Palm Sunday

Most palm trees require year-round temperatures above 40 degrees

outdoors.

30- Seward’s Day (Alaska)

Shall we have a slice of Baked Alaska, in your honor?

2015’s “Old Farmer’s Almanac” mentions a plant that is native to

Alaska and Canada,

“Tall Jacob’s ladder (Polemonium acutiflorum) tolerates drought

and creates a ground cover, commonly with blue flowers.”

Words to Live By:

“A good head and a good heart are always a formidable

combination.”

~Nelson Mandela

The Smithsonian Backyard series of books came with a

sweet stuffed bird. When I received this gift, my book’s

subject was inevitably about a robin, along with my toy

being a robin.

This book begins with a lovely Spring message and ends

with a helpful glossary of words and description of the

habits of each bird in the series.

“Robin at Hickory Street,” (1995) was written by Dana

Meachen Rau and illustrated by Joel Snyder. Read this

and it will give you a beautiful picture of the changing

of the seasons in nature.

“Winter’s song fills the backyard of the blue stone house

on Hickory Street. A honeysuckle branch taps a beat on

the kitchen window.  Wind whistles through swaying

spruces. Rhythmic drips of melting ice dot the snow.

Soon this chorus will be replaced by Spring’s. The sweet

murmur of honey bees, the rustling of chipmunks behind

the shed and the cheerful melody of a robin who will call

this yard his own.”

The book is 32 pages and in the description of the robin’s

song, it is given as: “Cheerily, cheer-up, cheerio.”

And on that note. . .

“Cheerio!”

I’m Looking Over a 4 Leaf Clover

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Good luck charms come in a variety of ways. Some may have

a penny in each loafer, like I did in the sixties. Some

may pick up every penny they see on the ground. Some may

study it, as they bend down. Since, if it is facing up,

then you will have good luck. If it is facing down, the

‘omen’ may be that you won’t have any luck. Just as when

you hang a horse shoe, don’t ever hang it facing down! This

means your luck will be ‘draining out.’

Every culture that I can think of has some kind of tradition

or superstition that some members of it, follow. Now, I have

met many people who feel no fears of walking under a ladder,

opening their umbrella, in the house as they step out into

a torrent of rain or don’t worry a bit, if a black cat passes

in front of them.

I have a picture of my Dad in a little pocket of my car, by

the dashboard. I also have a Las Vegas poker chip (given to

me by a friend who has been there and won big stakes) stored

in another part of my car. I have yet to travel there, but

have a cousin, Heather, who I could stay with, when I go. I

also have a little silver ladybug, who is in my luggage, to

keep me ‘safe’ and give me ‘safe travel mercies.’ My parents

had a St. Christopher medal hanging on their rearview mirror.

I never store a purse, sell one or give one away without a

penny stuck in each one of them. I particularly save the years

of my three children’s birthdays. I suppose, for me, “Pennies

from Heaven” would explain this purse tradition.

I was very excited when someone gave me a list of talisman for

many different areas of the world. It is not the sum of all of

them, I am sure! This will, at least, get you started.

Here is the lovely list given to me:

1. Bumble Bee- for luck and prosperity.

2. Anchor- for hope and optimism.

3. Egyptian Ankh- for health, wealth and longer life.

4. Mushroom- good things to come.

Are we sure this didn’t just come from the ‘stoners’

in the sixties and seventies? Party on!

5. Pig- for wealth.

6. Owl- for wisdom and truth

Now, I understand why people collect owls and pigs!

7. Grecian key- for knowledge and opportunity.

You see on Greek sororities and fraternities, a symbol

of a key. Now, you know what the significance behind

this. We had Key Club in high school, where students who

were wishing to be prepared to become leaders, joined.

8. Horseshoe- for protection and luck.

9. Rooster- for good fortune and justice.

10. Thor’s Hammer- for success in adversity.

11. Pole Star- for guidance and safety.

12. Japanese Frog- for safe travel.

13. Four leaf clover- for luck and happiness.

This goes hand in hand, with shamrocks, which is an

Irish tradition for good luck, too. Happy St. Patrick’s

Day, to you all!

14. Buddha’s Shell- for fortune and sanctity.

15. Elephant- for luck.

I always thought this should include the trait of

memory? Like an elephant never forgets. But this was

not included in this talismans’ list of qualities.

16. Turtle- for wisdom.

17. Lion- for a long life.

18. Horse- for achievement and happiness.

This also I thought would include some kind of racing

reference… like being quick?

19. Eye of Horus- for health and wealth.

20. Sun- for awareness and enlightenment.

21. Dolphin- for friendship.

I feel we, as humans, have an affinity for animals. I

can definitely understand why we would show respect for

the creatures of the world.

Hope that this list will have given you something to

think about. If you have a special token or charm that

you carry around with you, please let us know. I would

like to hear about the significance, if there is a

culture or tradition tied to it, or any other details.

I was surprised that the list that was given to me, did

not include a rabbit. As in a rabbit’s foot used to be

put on key chains and by rubbing one, you were supposed

to get good luck. Probably the whole idea of it seems

horrifying, nowadays, since we have the prevention of

cruelty to animals. But, my uncle, who was a hunter and

a high school biology teacher, would have said,

“What’s the big deal? You have to cut the feet off and

skin it, to be able to have rabbit stew!”

Good luck and “May the Road Rise Up to Greet You!”

Last year’s post around this time, I had a nice St. Patrick’s

Day blessing included, you may wish to check out.

Friday’s Fun Day

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Happy celebrating an Early St. Patrick’s Day!

Several of my coworkers were heading out of

work, since today is our ‘half’ day, to buy

some green beer. They said, “Come on, Robin!”

No, I just could not do it! Now, I would have

said, “Yes!” to green eggs and bacon, or green

pancakes!

Anyway, while we are on the subject of drinking,

I thought I would share one of those humorous

forwards that land in my emails! I am actually

going to type it in, since you never know what

may be attached to this! I changed a few words

so no plagiarism lawsuits will ensue! Ha Ha!

Also, this will help us all…

IMPORTANT HEALTH INFORMATION:

Do you have feelings of inadequacy?

Do you suffer from shyness?

Do you sometimes wish you were more

assertive?

If you answered yes to any of these questions you

may wish to find a physician or pharmacist about…

Cabernet Sauvignon.

Cabernet is the safe, natural way to feel better and

more confident about yourself and your actions. It

can help ease you out of your shyness and let you tell

the world that you’re ready and willing to do just

about anything!

You will notice the benefits of Cab, as those who are

familiar with this beverage call it. Almost immediately,

with a regimen of regular does, you can overcome any

obstacles that prevent you from living the life you want

to live.

Shyness and awkwardness will be a thing of the past and

you will discover many talents you never knew you had.

Stop hiding and start living.

Cabernet Sauvignon may not be right for everyone. Women

who are pregnant or nursing should never use it.

However, women who wouldn’t mind nursing or becoming

pregnant are encouraged to try it.

SIDE EFFECTS:

Side effects may include dizziness, nausea, vomiting

incarceration, loss of motor control, loss of clothing,

loss of money, loss of virginity, delusions of grandeur

and a desire to sing Karaoke and play all night rounds

of Strip Poker, Truth or Dare and Naked Twister.

WARNINGS:

The consumption of Cab or other wine or alcohol choices

may make you think you are whispering when you are not.

The consumption of Cab may cause you to tell your friends

over and over again that you love them.

The consumption of Cab may cause you to think you can

sing (or other talents you do not have in your ‘wheel

house.’)

The consumption of Cab may create the illusion you are

tougher, smarter, faster and better looking than most

people.

Now, just imagine what you could achieve with a decent

Shiraz, Pinot Noir or Merlot!

No matter what- Enjoy your weekend!!

Early St. Patrick’s Day Message

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I have been on a roll lately, just cranking these out!

I am not all about quantity but quality would be best.

Just have had some muse on my shoulder.

We had the St. Valentine holiday that so many people

love to celebrate with candy, flowers, and poetry.

Now we have the down to earth holiday, where we drink

ale (or beer), eat corned beef and cabbage, and act a little

crazy! That’s St. Patrick’s day!

I have more Scotch’blood’ than Irish but my father told me

something that was surprising. He sympathized with the Irish,

so please wear green! His forbears are equally divided into Scotch

and English.  On the ancestral tree we are so many steps to King

Phillip and equally many steps to King Bruce. If we were being a

pain in the Irish’s arse we would wear orange (because we are

Episcopalian, not Catholic!)

Anyway, my favorite Irish saying is the one my Mom

has on a plate by the kitchen sink:

_________________An Old Irish Blessing___________________

May the road rise up to meet you.

May the wind always be at your back.

May the sun shine warm upon your face and rains fall soft upon your fields.

And until we meet again,

May God hold you in the palm of His hand.

 

I hope you not only dance a jig, kiss someone, pinch someone (for not wearing

green) that you will feel totally blessed this whole month of March!

Here is a short verse:

These things I warmly wish for you~~someone to love, some work to do,

a bit o’ sun, a bit o’ cheer, and a Guardian Angel always near. (author unknown)