Category Archives: heat wave

No Hazard Pay!

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We had a rough week, those of us on the second levels at our warehouse. We

felt the heat and we also had some different ‘flying objects’ to contend with!

I was wearing a box on my head on Tuesday, after 3 roofing crews, that were

over 4 inches long got air gunned through the metal corrugated roof, and

whizzed past my head!

My friend, Amy, (who is the coworker and owner of Spirit and Lokie, horses)

called her manager, Chris. Chris walked around down below me, until she found

one of these screws, that had not fallen into stacked products. She took the item

to Mark J. who is in charge of maintenance and repair, since he is ‘supervising’

our outside roof contractors.

I decided to think about which dress to wear to my niece’s wedding. “I will be

driving up to Cleveland on Friday,” I would reflect.

“I wonder what I can find in Mom’s closet, that she will feel comfortable in.

She doesn’t like sleeveless or short sleeved clothing. We will be under a tent,

but can sit outside it, to catch a breeze.”

I also wondered, “Will Mom get nostalgic, since we will be at her and Dad’s

cottage, where Libby has been living for over six months? Will she want to

go to neighbors’ homes, saying ‘hello’ and giving her famous hugs?”

These thoughts got my mind off the overwhelmingly loud, zapping sounds

that the nail guns through the metal did to ‘jar my senses’ back to reality.

Later, “I don’t have too many hours until I get off work…”

Here is that fallacy of not having many hours: I was at work on Monday and

Thursday for 11 hours, Tuesday and Wednesday for 10 hours, so we were’ let

off early’ today. They don’t want to have to pay us many overtime hours.

I was getting hot, so I stopped, took my box off my head, went down the metal

grated steps to the first floor. This area I work in is called, “The Bomb Shelter.”

It is all enclosed and encased in concrete blocks. I asked my good friend, Mark

C., who was emptying broken bottle of anti-freeze into a large container, through

a funnel, if he was getting sleepy from the fumes. He said, “No, but I am leaving

this area, as soon as I do this last container, since I just got ‘dinged’ by a series

of concrete pieces! They must be trying to drill holes through the cement walls

up there!” He proceeded to show me 4 pieces that were chips the size of large

pretzel sticks. They were about one inch wide and four inches long.

I joked with him that I was going to stop by my grandsons’ house and ask if

they still had their hard hats, which they still call, “Bob the Builder” hats!

I came back with my water bottle, refilled and a long white paper towel

that I had gotten wet, in the drinking fountain. I had this wrapped around

my neck, saying that the box on my head was ‘not conducive’ to cooling off!

Mark C. left, the maintenance supervisor, Mark, came in and asked if I had

actually been ‘hit’ by any of the flying screws, and unfortunately for me, I had

not!

As I later went to lunch, I stopped in my immediate supervisor’s office and

gave an ‘oral report.’ I asked her if she had already heard that there were nails

or screws coming through the ceiling and flying closely by us. I also told her

there were at least ten new holes in the ceiling. She said to go on to lunch and

if I felt more comfortable, wear the box. She thought the nails or screws would

be ‘less frequent,’ since Mark J. had contacted the company and the roofing

men were told to ‘be more careful.’

Wednesday, a man from the roofing company showed up, in the aerosol room.

No one but someone in receiving who was stocking and myself were up there.

He advised both of us, seriously without any apology given for Tuesday’s

activity:

“When you hear drilling, don’t look up!”

I stood there, with a little bit of a puzzled look on my face. I tried to

change this to my ‘stern teacher’ or ‘angry mother’ look. I waited for

awhile, then turned around, put my box back on my head and said

not a word.

When he came back on Thursday, he caught Mark C., who had not reported

to his supervisor or anyone that he had chosen to vacate what he considered

a dangerous area.

I asked him if he had shown Mark J. the cement chips that he still had lined

up on his ‘desk.’ He said he felt that my report and Chris’ turning in the one

screw that was found that had not landed in amongst pallets where numerous

ones could be seen, looking through the grated metal second floor.

I later told Charlene that Mark C. still had the chips from there, she immediately

told Mark J. her boss. Charlene hurried from the breakroom, where we had

just watched one of the episodes of “Bold and the Beautiful.”

I am sure that there are worse case scenarios to work disasters. I know that when

my oldest daughter went to a church ‘work camp’ they were nailing a sheet metal

roof onto a recreational building in the Appalachian Mountains. She got a slice

through her hand, wearing  a so-called ‘work glove.’ She had to have stitches, I

received a call from the hospital where she had been taken. She wore a plastic

bag over it, the next day, while jumping into a running stream, waterfall and

a pond they visited, with some local children. She did not feel that it was a

very big deal, so I have decided that my episode isn’t such a big deal, either.

Just had to tell you, I was not too keen on working this week.

No extra ‘hazard pay!’

Oh…

For second breaks, all week long, since our building hit 100 degrees inside…

We got popsicles from the company!

Wow!

Well worth the dangerous situations, huh?!

Tell me a few of your ‘worst nightmare’ jobs, please!