Category Archives: Judy Garland

Thursday’s Doors~ September 10, 2015

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The door today is on a house located on West William Street close to Curtis Street which runs perpendicular to the house. It almost seems like Curtis would run straight into the surrounding wooded area. The house disguised by the woods “hides” the possible past home of a famous Delaware, Ohio family.

The house is currently painted gray, has black details and a Victorian front door. The porch which leads up to the door is decorated with white painted lattice work which I generally say may be found on “gingerbread houses.”

The white door may not be the original door. It has four small windows at the top of this rather tall door. It has three sets of panels with wooden strips framing them, all painted white.

Again, picture a gray house, black outlines and white details. A door which seems looming in size, with more details seen close up than far away.

I wonder if the famous family had a taller male as head of household?

Do Victorian homes tend to have taller doors?

I would need a step stool to decorate around this door with strings of leaves on a vine, which I had done on my last home. I like the idea of getting this house ready for Halloween.
In September, I would hang a grape vine wreath on this door. It would have golden silk sunflowers with a pretty ribbon of fall colors coming to a bow at the bottom.

The door recently seen, has no decoration on it. The large picture window, opening over the porch, has many panes outlined with black painted wood strips. The woodwork has some cracks in the paint once you climb the five steps onto the porch.
The curtains were a deep blue which held anything behind them “hostage” in the hidden recesses.

A closer look shows a small placard with a wooden frame. It reveals the past homeowners. It is not on a historical registry. It was a stop along the road of many stops chosen by a film director who had one singular famous wife and child.

The outstanding porch chandelier which on a snowy night was lit,  had caught my eyes.

It seemed to beckon visitors. It may have meant the house was ready for company. I imagined a long lost family member, errant but expected to return.

It is the crystal chandelier which is the only sign this is a special house. It distinguished the house and set it apart. The door doesn’t have a door knob, it has one of those handles with a curlicue at the base. It looks like it is painted black but this makes me wonder.

Would stripping the black paint off reveal brass?

I was driving past this house often, back in 1991 and 1992. My good friend and fellow single mother, Lori, had 3 children close to the same ages as mine. She lived about ten houses from this lovely, old house.

The house once the light was left on, shone through the bare wooded area surrounding this home set back from a busy road.

Had the light not been shining brightly with the way crystal reflects, especially on snow and icicles hanging from the porch roof . . .

Had one of my children asked me a question, taking my mind off looking at the scenery while driving a slow paced 30 miles per hour down this snow covered familiar road . . .

I may have missed seeing this home. I may have not realized it’s “lineage.” So many times houses are missed due to their location.

The porch has a pair of white worn rocking chairs. They have left grooves on the worn gray painted wooden planks on the porch floor.

* 311 North Washington Street, Delaware, Ohio 43015
has the privelege of being a house on a hill which was designated the inspiration for “Meet Me at St. Louis,” a film Vincente Minnelli directed in 1944.

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When I suggested to my friend, Lori, that we walk down the sidewalk and head west from her house to Trick or Treat, she thought this was a great idea. We usually piled into her van and went to one of the nearby neighborhoods. Houses close by, easier to go up and down short driveways had been our plan a few years in a row. She had moved from a smaller house in one such neighborhood and on this particular long time past Halloween, now lived in an older, bigger place.

We got to the Vincent Minneli house around dark, it had taken us 45 minutes to cover 9 houses. These older homes have gracious hosts with kind offers to sit on edges of porches and eat marshmallow rice krispie squares, caramel apples and frosted cookies. Apple cider, Kool Aid and water pitchers poured into paper cups, to wash down the sugary treats.

When we got to the beautiful Minnelli house, we felt like the driveway was a mile long. I had Felicia up on my shoulders, she had her younger Jacob upon her hip.

The house had the elegant chandelier shining brightly as our feet crunched through the fallen leaves.

We were very excited to read the framed listing of residents:

Mr. and Mrs. Vincente Minnelli

Retired from film making,

Lived within these walls.

Whose first wife was,

Judy Garland,

Whose daughter was

Liza Minneli,

and half-sister

Christiane Minnelli.

I remember reading this aloud to our children while we waited for the people to arrive and answer the door.

There were only two children listed in family members names in Vincente Minneli’s biography, Liza and Christiane.

My son (age 11) said rather amusingly,

“As long as the people don’t have scary flying monkeys we will like this, Mom.”

The elderly couple must have been between 85 and 90. One was a tall, white haired gentleman who leaned on his cane and the other was a stooped, gray haired woman in a dress and apron.
We were not sure how many people had traipsed up this driveway but we were warmly received.

You may be shocked but we were escorted into a kitchen that had a fireplace blazing, treats in brown paper lunch bags with an orange gingham ribbon tying each one.

We will never forget this unusual feature in the kitchen: a dumbwaiter! It worked, too.

Last, but not least, the residents told us they were not relatives of any Minelli family members.

~Written by Robin Oldrieve Cochran

(9/10/15)

This is a part of Norm Frampton’s Thursday’s Doors and you may find his post where links to other blogs with Door posts are displayed through photographs, descriptions and history frequently given at:

http://miscellaneousmusingsofamiddleagedmind.wordpress.com


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This next part was my previously published post:

It was a Character Study of a homeless woman. If you have read it before feel free to skip it.

I decided to have a connection built in this practice in character development with someone famous. . .

When I started to write about characters, I chose to

begin with two homeless men. I mentioned that there

are a few different people who I have seen in

Delaware, through inclement weather and over a year.

The men I gave names to, helping me to become ‘real’

and giving them character traits.

I used my imagination as a ‘springboard’ to create

some depth and authenticity.

After all, when we write, unless we are sticking to the

total truth of our own lives, we need to learn how to

develop characters. I will not be writing a memoir

someday, although many of you are or may.

I think I am destined for writing fiction, using partly

truths based on people I have met, while adding

details to create interest and variety.

These ‘character studies’ have been my way of

practicing and honing my writing skills.

Something important that is easy to accidentally do,

when we start to write, is to make the people in our

books into ‘caricatures.’ One’s aim should be to create

people who are able to ‘walk off the pages of your

book.’ After reading, over the years, a few books on

writing (another post’s focused on the ‘experts’ I have

studied) I did find out when it is considered

acceptable to incorporate some stereotypes.

These times can be when you are going for a broad

comedy, a science fiction or comic book type of style.

When you are creating sy-fy, in most situations you

wish the story to become believable and transport to

the foreign land of the future. It could be a stylistic,

polished picture that you may paint, like a top hat,

black tie book.

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s book, “The Great Gatsby,” comes

to mind where the characters are painted with rather

broad strokes… The character of Daisy’s husband is

abusive but she doesn’t seem to mind. She is

controlled by him, much to her friend, Gatsby’s

dismay. He may not have the appropriate lineage

to fit into the Jazz age, outlandishly extravagant upper

class picture that F.S.F. imparts. But Gatsby is the

most ‘real’ man, in my opinion, other than the narrator,

Nick Carraway.

I feel for both men’s tough situations. Gatsby tried so

hard to fit into society, out of love for Daisy. His

lifestyle, on the surface appears to be wealthy by his

buying a mansion and throwing lavish parties.

My character of “Billie” is a woman who has been

around Delaware,Ohio for over a year. She has been

seen by my youngest daughter and me, on a park

bench in Mingo Park, along the walking trail

between William Street and Winter Street and on the

sidewalk by a plaza on Sandusky Street.

I have noticed this woman’s wavy, sometimes

tangled strawberry blonde hair. It is not a brightly

colored shiny head of hair, but mostly a faded,

tarnished one.

She has a big backpack, which she may store

somewhere in the summertime, hiding it so she

doesn’t have to carry it constantly. It looks heavy.

Since we have seen her, wearing shorts, a tank top

and a sweatshirt wrapped around her waist. There

was no physical evidence, on that occasion, to appear

homeless.

Only once in the half dozen times where I have noted

her appearance, did I see her hair, woven into a loose

braid with a red rubber band at the end of it.

“Billie” makes me think of Pippi Longstocking, a

creation of the author, Astrid Lindgren. I imagine her

to have had a special life, once upon a time, like the

Swedish character.

The books about 9 year old, Pippi, were published

between 1945 and 1948. The chapter books are funny,

unusual and I would hesitate to ever try to imitate the

zaniness of the children’s story lines of those amazing

chapter books.

I can imagine “Billie” as a rebellious and interesting

person, who may have been a “hippie” in the seventies.

I tried to visualize her as an affluent woman, who may

have lost her path in life. I don’t ‘see’ that in her,

if my views on her are at all possibly going to be

realistic, I have to think she made some choices that

took her away from a traditional working life. I have

to hope she doesn’t have children, although her losing

them to foster care, then a financial struggle could

be part of her past.

“Billie” was wearing dirty and raggedy jeans, a khaki

Army jacket, and wore on her back, the brown rolled

sleeping bag peeking out of her knapsack. The last

time I saw her, she was standing out in the rain. She

had one hand in her pocket and the other raised to

push her loose locks back into the hooded gray

sweatshirt that was under her jacket.

The layered look was a necessity because the nights

were ranging in the low 30’s.

Although this Army jacket may seem to give a glimpse

of her Life’s choices and personal history which may

include she may have been enrolled at one time, we

can not be sure of this. The local Salvation Army and

Goodwill stores often have Army jackets, among their

donated coats.

I would like to envision a happier past for “Billie,” one

out in the country. Maybe she was a Girl Scout, a 4-H

member or her family went camping. This would have

taught her the skills to be able to survive all four

seasons here in Delaware.

I could visualize her skipping stones along the creek,

fishing with her father and maybe, if he were an

outdoorsman, going along while he pulled or checked

animal traps.

I wonder if “Billie” has an Army knife?

I wonder if she eats at the three different churches

that serve homeless or ‘down on their luck’ families?

Then, on the last week which is not covered by these

meals, does she go to Andrews House?

Has she ever slept there in one of the bunk beds?

That is the only ‘loft’ for homeless people we have,

usually with a long waiting list.

When I saw her last summer, “Billie” seemed to have a

wistful look in her eyes. She was sitting on a park

bench, watching a group of ducks on the tributary of

the Olentangy River.

She doesn’t have a hardened look, at least through my

eyes. I see her as not dissatisfied with her plight in

life.

Acceptance and courage resonate from her freckled

face to the way she holds herself. That jaunty hand in

the pocket, the once, braided hair. Most of the time,

the tangled mess of hair seems to shout,

“I don’t give a hoot what people think!”

Does she take a knife or scissors to the hair so that

she has less of it in the summer?

Did she ever stop and talk to “Joe,” last summer, the

younger man with his dog? (Who frequented the

library and I had hoped had made it South or out

West.) His tan face and sun-bleached blonde hair, had

given me a ‘surfer’ sort of impression…

I don’t see her liking that ‘cowboy’ or Irish looking

“Brian,” who was straddling the big dumpster. He

seems to be too odd to trust, maybe even a little scary

to the short, 5′ 3″ or so, woman.

I may seem a dreamer, maybe a woman with her ‘rose

colored glasses’ firmly in place, but I think that “Billie”

is not unhappy in this location.

Due to a bit of whimsy attached to that unmanageable

blondish red hair, I guess “Billie” caught my attention.

Once upon a time, Liza Minnelli with her mother, Judy

Garland and grandfather, Vincente Minnelli may have

visited Delaware, Ohio.

After all, Vincente’s paternal grandparents lived in

Delaware, Ohio.

Vincenzo Minnelli, had been a traveling piano

salesman, from Indiana, Michigan and Ohio. He was

working for the Knabe Piano Company, when

Vincenzo met Nina Pinket, his future wife in Delaware,

Ohio.

Although there is no proof in the biographical

information that I found, Vincente’s father, may have

taught music at Ohio Wesleyan University.

I would like to wonder, ponder and imagine that “Billie”

could have some famous roots. It would be interesting

if she had turned up her nose at those in her famous

cousins’ family.

What could the possibilities be for “Billie” were she

sought out by distant cousins, siblings or others,

finding her in this town, not far from where she was

meant to be?

If so, she isn’t in Kansas anymore…

Moving Ahead to Don Gay Apparel

Image

My coworker, Josephina, who goes by “Joe” among her friends

outside of work and “Fee” here at the warehouse, was sharing her

hopes for her wife and children to have an abundant Christmas.

Since the past two weeks, our hours have been cut, I have been

worried about those who have waited to purchase Santa’s gifts,

but cannot offer to help out anyone, unfortunately.

Fee was telling me about a publication on Monday, saying I

“should check it out.” It is called, “Outlook” magazine, which is

on the free newstand outside our library interior doors. This

would be like the ‘foyer’ of the building, where there are a few

public notices for clubs, organizations, and other public service

announcements.

I took home “Outlook” and was amazed at the multitude of very

interesting articles and information for the holidays presented

within a ‘magazine’ for Gays, Bisexuals and Lesbians. I was so

enthralled with the subject of music, since the ‘stereotype’ of

this magnificent group of human beings, is they love their

musicals and ‘show tunes.’ The articles about famous local

people and famous national people who have recently ‘come out’

had my attention, too.  The recipes for cocktails and yummy

appetizers had me interested and copying a few down. It is a very

informative and well-rounded publication. On the cover is a lovely

photograph of Bette Midler. Her article is titled,

“Divine Intervention.”

Do you remember when Bette Midler wore corsets and was on the

wild side, as “The Divine Miss M?” She made a lot of friends in the

gay and lesbian community, singing in the Continental Bath House.

I still consider her attractive, liked her G-rated family movie with the

theme of being an unprepared grandmother, “Parental Guidance.”

Her songs, “God Is Watching Us” and “The Wind Beneath My Wings,”

are on my all time favorite Top 50 songs.

 

Why did Fee send me to pick this up? The better question is,

“What took me so long?”

I have had a long history of having many gay friends, particularly

the guy who took me to my high school prom, along with both of

my brothers’ good and oldest friends. My youngest brother met

his friend in running clubs. My ‘older,’ one who is only 18 months

younger than I, had not noticed his high school friend who was a

wrestler and also, accompanied a group of us to my brother’s

high school prom, until college when he ‘came out’ to him.

 

Speaking of ‘coming out’ there is a well researched and presented

article on this subject in “Outlook.” It is addressing the idea of

trying this over the holidays. I would say letting relatives who are

younger know about your personal choices, but wait to inform

ones who are older. This is a ‘tricky minefield,’ and why make

the  holidays uncomfortable?

 

My friend, Fee, told me a few interesting facts about her life,

along with her girlfriend’s, too. Most people think that she and

her girlfriend are just living together to save money, to share

co-parenting with another woman and also, their long lasting

friendship. Fee also shared her growing up years with me, over a

sparsely populated break time. We had chosen to go to break later

than most of the order fillers. She is a grown version of Campbell’s

Soup kids. I would describe her as a past redhead, more blonde now.

She told me about how average looking she had been, how she did

not have much confidence and how being in a steady relationship

with her first boyfriend led to her marrying him. She says she had

lack of self esteem. Fee was friends with Jessie, her current partner,

through many years as Jessie was married to a friend of her husband’s.

I was glad to hear that there was no history of abuse on the part of

either of their husbands against them. This traumatic experience

can sometimes draw people away from being heterosexual.

My coworker Karen and her Suzie experienced this, individually

although not necessarily conclusive proof of most gays or lesbians.

 

In the case of the men I have known in my life, they ‘knew’ it, all

along but fought their desires to be with men, wanting so badly to fit

into the ‘normal’ society.

 

Fee told me their children are so happy they are a family. Some of

the kids remember the turmoil while they had fathers in their house.

Jessie was the ‘brave one,’ Fee told me. She ‘came out’ and told her

she loved Fee.  Fee still has a Granny and an “Auntie” who don’t

know that the two roommates are lovers. Fee also did give our work

insurance a ‘thumb’s up,’ since they do cover same sex partners for

medical, dental and vision insurance. Fee would like to get married

to Jessie. She says their wedding announcements would say a silly

and joyful declaration (like):

“Jessie is my girl,

Joe is my guy.

Together~

Jessica and Josephina

are one happy couple,

One happy family.”

Jessie embarrassed me a bit, but mainly since we work together, I

would not want to picture any of my coworkers’ romantic lives…

But Fee told me that the two of them take turns leading the family,

doing certain chores like cooking and cleaning, depending on their

busy schedules, She went a ‘step farther’ to share with me,

“Jessie likes me to be the ‘guy’ and I don’t mind wearing the pants

in the house, but sometimes I want to be the ‘girl’ who gets their

bath drawn, back and body parts rubbed and all those delicious

moments.”

Since I was sad to hear that a male college student got beat up

recently in the news, for holding hands and kissing in public,

I wished to ask her a personal question about prejudice. She told

me a shocking thought, that she “felt luckier to be a woman who

chooses to be gay, since men have it harder, it is not as easy for

society to accept men who are gay.”  She continued to surprise me,

by saying,

“It is easier to be a ‘gay woman’ than to be of a different race. You

know you can ‘hide’ your sexuality, if you choose, but I feel bad since

the world is still a harsh place to be if you are of color.”

Fee told me to go ahead and put the musical lists that I found in my

post, as long as I focused on a song that she and Jessie love and feel

says it all:

” Waiting on the World to Change,”

John Mayer,

“Continuum”

album,

2006.

 

How could I not include the fine and exquisite list of holiday songs,

recommended by the “Outlook” media magazine?

This is an excellent and eclectic list. Hope you will enjoy this and

it is much more encompassing than my short list of favorites on

another post.

1. “Blue Christmas,” by Elvis.

2. India.Arie with Trombone Shorty, playing “I’ve Got My Love

to Keep Me Warm.”

3.  Kenny G. and Dave Koz, “Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow.”

4. Idina Menzel (of “Frozen” children’s animated film fame and also,

original cast of “Rent” on Broadway) singing the songs

“Holiday Wishes”

“Do You Hear What I Hear?”

“All I Want for Christmas, is You.”

and ** Original song written by I. Menzel, with Walter Afanseif

and Charlie Midnight, “December Prayer.” (The critics say this is

wonderful.)

5. Harry Connick, Jr. singing an original song, “When My Heart

Finds Christmas.”

6. Barbara Streisand, (recommended her whole album),

“A Christmas Album.”

7. Human Nature, “The Christmas Album,” with the songs that

they highlighted as, “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas”

and an original song, “Mary’s Boy Child.” (I need to listen to

these original songs recommended very soon!)

8. Dave Koz, “The 25th of December” album. One song that

caught my interest was “All You Need is Love,” from the Beatles,

of course:

Sung with Stevie Wonder, Gloria Estefan, Richard Marx,  Heather

Headley and Johnny Mathis.

9. Any Christmas songs sung by Johnny Mathis, they absolutely

loved and recommended. The nicknamed J. M.: “Mr. Christmas!”

The favorite on the list of mine is, “It’s the Most Wonderful Time

of the Year.”

10. The Singing Bee brought us “Pentatonix,” which is an all

a capella group of singers. The song that is their original holiday

song is, “That’s Christmas to Me.”

11. Take 6 (band) plays “He is Christmas.” An original song to be

listened and appreciated.

 

The fun and lively Christmas Concert for my granddaughter’s (Lara)

Fifth Grade Chorus had these songs on their program:

1. “Yankee Doodle Boy/ Kid From the U.S.A” written by John Jacobson

and Alan Billingsley.

2. “Colors of Winter,” written by Amy F. Bernon.

3. “All I Want for Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth,” by Don Gardner and

arrangement by Sally K. Albrecht.

4. “March Pat-a-Pan,” accompanied on the flute by Ana Moder and on the

hand drum by Stacy Lemke, Chorus director. The song was arranged by

Audrey Snyder.

 

I enjoyed the four songs sung by the Sixth Grade Chorus:

1. “Jubilate Deo,” an old traditional “round” song, no author or lyricist

given.

2. “Hava Nashira,” Israelis Folk Song, arranged by John Leavitt and

accompanied by Laura Lenhart on the clarinet.

3. “Gloria Tibi Domine” written by Greg Gilpin.

4. “Peace on Earth/ It Came Upon a Midnight Clear.”

 

 

Are there any other songs you would like to include?

I am always happy to feature music and especially

recommend your looking

into the original songs

on this list.

Music connects our senses,

gets us up and moving,

it builds emotions

and brings

couples

closer.

If

we

could

only get

the world

to connect

so easily

it would

be a

better

place.

I am ‘off’ to see the “Fantasy of Lights, ” after I pick up my oldest

daughter, Carrie with her two boys, Skyler and Micah.

We plan to go see Santa Claus and eat a dessert out.

(Wouldn’t hot chocolate and cookies, pie or cake be scrumptious?)

 

The Main Event: The 86th Academy Awards Ceremony

Standard

The 86th Oscar presentations began with the humor and

grace shown by host, Ellen DeGeneres. She has been a

host for the Oscars before and made a point that it had

been ‘awhile’ since she had been there.

In actuality, Ellen had been the host seven years ago.

She also made a joke about being the “most important

person,” because the show needs someone to name who the

next honoree will be. I liked that Ellen also reminded

the ones who have won or been nominated multiple times,

like Meryl Streep for 18 times. The way she plays off

this, making Meryl feel honored plus kidded at, shows

her comedic skills. Adding that being nominated and

having to buy expensive fancy dresses meant Meryl

‘could not afford any more nominations!’

Then she told Amy Adams that she was “selfish” for

her multiple nominations.

Most of the time, Ellen was humorous, making

playful jabs. Not sure how the one joke will be

received when she did say, that by not letting

certain movies “win” would prove the ones who

voted were “racists.” This is in reference to

“Mandela,” “12 Years a Slave,” and “The Butler.”

You probably have heard of the ‘selfie’ she took

with almost all the big names in the front rows

included, that it shut down Twitter by ‘going

viral!’

Another humorous part of Ellen’s playing the

host was she “ordered pizzas” for the front rows

and had the pizza delivery man help her serve

people. Ellen made sure to give the pregnant

women in the audience a piece of pizza. She later

got a hold of a hat that resembled Pharrell

Williams’ hat, (at the Grammy’s it looked like the

Smokey the Bear hat) and was passing it around to

collect money to pay for the pizzas. Plus, Ellen

was specifically calling on famous people for a tip

for the delivery man.

She also emphasized,

“Meryl, you gave enough!”

Jonah Hill must show some nudity in his movie

with Leonardo DiCaprio, “Wolf on Wall Street,”

since there were a couple of jokes about his

body. Ellen said, in an intentionally innuendoed

way, “I saw something of yours, I have not seen

for a very, very long time!”

Then, later after a commercial break, standing

looking down at Jonah, in his seat, she said,

“No, I don’t want to see it.”

Jonah replied, “What’s the big deal?”

Jared Leto was the first actor who was chosen for

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture. This was

for his role in “Dallas Buyers Club.” Jared gave a

great, planned speech. It included an homage to the

other actors in this category, saying ‘thanks to

his fellow nominees’ for their terrific performances.

Then he said, “Thank you to my Mom and my brother.”

Thirdly, he said, “To all the dreamers out there,

those not in the Ukraine and Venezuela,…”

emphasizing recent current events, turmoils and

struggles, he wished others to keep on dreaming of

possibilities.

Jared did a final tribute in his speech to those victims

of AIDS who have passed on, those that are still in other

countries, needing medicine (for HIV positive), too.

Jim Carrey, as a presenter, said it ‘must be tough to

be nominated.’ He said, “I wouldn’t know how it feels

to be nominated.” (There was one serious movie that I

felt he deserved to be nominated for in “The Majestic.”

He did a meaningful and understated acting job in this

which showed his talent. I like his comedies but they

don’t always get nominated…)

Jim also did a joke about Bruce Dern’s facial appearance

and the way his character said things, in the movie,

“Nebraska.” He also said something I didn’t quite get

about LSD, “No I meant animation like penguins, beloved

movie heroes…” This led into a great series of animated

cartoon movies, including more than these:

“Brave,” “Snow White,” “Dumbo,” “Finding Nemo,” “Kung Fu

Panda.” I enjoyed this flashing back to humorous films

that children and adults alike enjoy.

Of course, Ellen plays “Dory,” in the “Finding Nemo”

movie, so she pointed out,

“Did you see I made sure they had more of ‘Finding

Nemo’ in the clips?”

Pharrell Williams came out and sang, with a lively

entourage of varied ages the song, “Happy.” This

was nominated for the “Best Song” category for the

movie, “Despicable Me 2” (which my grandsons loved!)

You may want to remember this man’s name, since he

has already been to the Golden Globes, Grammy’s,

and the “Fifty Years of the Beatles” tribute show,

singing with Stevie Wonder and the like. This young

man has captured the little M & M granddaughters’

hearts and interest with this “Happy” song. It is

very pleasant, if you have not heard it, put it

on Youtube, close your eyes, and picture that he

sounds familiar, like Frank Sinatra or another

‘crooner.’

I was happy to see that the early 2014 movie,

“The Great Gatsby,” got both “Best Costume”

and “Best Set Design.” That was one movie I think

I reviewed, after I saw it with my youngest

daughter, Felicia.

Even though the critics ‘panned’ the movie,

“The Lone Ranger,” I liked it. I was sorry it did

not get the “Best Makeup Award” or something like

this, although it did get nominated for this award.

Dallas Buyers Club won, for making those thin,

anorexic AID’s male actors believable, along with

Jared’s pitiful makeup job to look like a woman.

Harrison Ford, upon arrival, his entrance being

heralded with the great John Williams “Indiana

Jones” theme song music, got cheers from the

audience. He incorporated a quote from Marlon

Brando about a ‘lot of hustle.’ He was there

presenting about the movie, “American Hustle.”

Matthew McConaughey with Kim Novak came out,

both looking very comfortable together. Kim

still has a husky and sexy voice, was from

many movies, including Alfred Hitchcock’s

“Vertigo.” I remember her in a sexy romp

comedy role in, “The Apartment,” with Tony

Randall. She wore a black silky pant suit,

with vividly bright blue lapels on it. She

has one of those ‘frozen’ faces, that sadly

due to her age, she has allowed too much

plastic surgery and is nearly unrecognizable.

She is 81 years old and I cannot fault her

on this. If anyone wants to see an equally

sad and ‘bad’ job of cosmetic surgery, check

out Mary Tyler Moore. She would have looked

great, has she gone the way of Betty White,

her fellow comedian on her show. Allowing

herself to age gracefully and not trying to

hang on to her youth.

Matthew and Kim were there to present the

awards for the short animated films and the

longer full-length animated films. Kim told

the audience she was excited to be there after

so many years had passed and to be there on

stage with Matthew McConaughey was a special

treat, too. I took her to be nervous and felt

bad for some of the comments I heard at work

and on one of the morning shows while I had

my first work break. I was very happy that the

movie, “Frozen,” won best animated movie. I

know my grandsons’ recommended “Despicable

Me 2” but they haven’t seen “Frozen” yet.

I have a good friend at work, Tammy who has

gone with Mike twice to the winning movie.

The Best Actor award went to Matthew McConaughey

and he gave a fantastic speech, giving the three

directions that we all need to go: Look up to

God and Family, Look Forward to other roles and

Chase after something… He said he is planning

on chasing to a ‘better self.’ In the part about

family, I liked that he included personal details

about his Mom demanding that they respect others

and themselves (first) and his Dad loving gumbo,

lemon meringue pie and a cold beer. When he was

finished with his acceptance speech, he said his

enthusiastic, “All right” three times, he is

known for this in his Southern drawled voice.

The Best Actress went to Cate Blanchett who

said that females still have a ‘niche’ and

they still can ‘sell movies,’ and buy tickets

to go to movies. She was happy with her role

in “Blue Jasmine,” a Woody Allen movie.

Lupita Nyong’O won the Best Supporting Actress

in “12 Years a Slave.” She had a long speech

prepared, although she started with some fun

smiles, surprised looks and very excited

responses. She said Thank you for the incredible

award, saluted the spirit of her character,

(based on a real person) named, Patsy. She said

the past few months it has haunted her, realizing

that her joy in being recognized as an actress

is due to a person who suffered much anguish

as a slave. She reminded “every child, your dreams

are valid.” I liked that word, “valid.” We hear

people say, “Your dreams can come true,” so often

it gets ‘old.’

The Academy’s President came out and spoke. She

is the First Black Woman to be given this honor.

It was about preserving the past,

honoring the present

and shaping the future.

Sally Fields looked fabulous, in a short

sleeved black dress, the bodice having black

sheer fabric with hand-sewn sequins look. She

introduced, “Movies with Real Heroes.”

There was a montage of film clips that included

“Ben Hur” (Charleton Heston), “Milk” (Sean Penn),

“Jackie Robinson,” “Erin Brockovich” (Julia Roberts),

“Ali” (Will Smith), “Braveheart” (Mel Gibson), “All

the President’s Men” (Robert Redford and Dustin

Hoffman), “They Call Me MISTER Tibbs,” (Sidney Poitier)

and the movie that Sally Fields held up the infamous

sign, that said, “Union:” “Norma Rae.” I also suggest

anyone who likes Sally Fields to see the movie,

“Abraham Lincoln.” She does a very good job in her

role as Mary Todd Lincoln.

The Special Effects montage included “Iron Man 3,”

“The Hobbit,” “The Lone Ranger,” “Star Trek into

Darkness,” and “Gravity.”

A simple song that is very sweetly sung, although it

did not win, listen to “The Moon Song,” from the

movie with Joaquin Phoenix, “Her.” (I don’t recommend

the movie, though!)

A Special Honorary Oscar went to Angela Lansbury,

who amazingly at age 88 is going to be in a theater

production play on the London stage. She was unable

to come to accept this award. They definitely said

she has quite a wide range throughout her lifetime

in film and theater. She also, amusingly enough,

sings well, in one of my children’s favorite movies,

“Bedknobs and Broomsticks.”

There was a standing ovation for Darlene Love who is

in a documentary with other famous/close to famous

back-up singers. She belted out a song about a

sparrow that was rich, spiritual and religious. She

came up to accept the award for the 20 or more singers

featured in, “20 Feet From Stardom.” I would like to

see this movie! Bradley Cooper was her co-presenter.

Although I enjoyed “Ordinary Love,” along with Mandela’s

quotations flashing behind Bono with U2, I think that

the funniest line all night was when the song from

“Frozen” won! The married couple who wrote the song

said that they worked well as a team and we…

“Beat literally rock stars for this Award!”

Pink sang the song, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,”

gently, not overdoing it, with spine tingling tone,

as a tribute to Judy Garland. Her children, including

Liza Minelli were present, asked to stand up and take

a bow. There was a montage of clips from the movie,

with both the black and white copies and the colorized

ones.

Whoopie Goldberg introduced it, showing us under her

black gown, she was wearing black and white striped

hose with red shiny shoes.

Ellen arrived at the end of the presentation, hurrying

on, once the stage was empty and all were gone, in

her huge fluffy pink Glinda the Good Witch costume!

Ellen only wore tuxes and once had a long white silk

scarf, another time a black tie. There were no big

wardrobe changes and this was her only grand finale

one!

Bette Midler had me crying a few tears, since she

sang after all the ones who had been in the film

industry and died in 2013, the eerily haunting

song, with her still radiant and strong voice,

“The Wind Beneath My Wings.” I love that line

in the song, “Did you ever know you were my

hero?”

This was not the end of the show but it

fits the end of my summary of the Oscars!

Tomorrow, I will post about the wild and

unique commercials shown during the Academy

Awards. It will be called, “Intermissions.”