Category Archives: lists

Is It Too Soon?

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Really, is it too soon?

 

Can we all laugh and joke about the subject a bit?

 

We are in the midst of it. . .

In the thick of it. . .

Knee deep, chin deep and over our head in it. . .

 

Yes, right.

Snow.

Chilly Weather.

Sub-zero temperatures.

Relief on the horizon.

 

I enjoy wordplays and this one just jumped right at me.

In the middle of the night, literally.

 

When the snow plow was noisily scraping the ice off the

Ohio Wesleyan Parking lot, when a big chunk somehow

bounced off my bedroom window pane.

 

Wish that chunk were like my good middle school friends,

ones who would break out of their houses, give a ‘chink’ or

‘clunk’ at my window on the second floor of my house.

 

Wish it were my Romeo, who would make me fly to the

window and ask,

“Why are you Romeo?”

(Aside: You do know that the words,

“Whereforth art you Romeo?

Means,  “Why are you a Capulet?”

or “Why are you my enemy?”

Right?)

 

Know this is not so esoteric or meaningful. It was written

as the hour passed three a.m. and I was to get up at 5 a.m.

 

It is all about “Chill.”

 

Hope you enjoy the way my mind played with the letters

and the meaning of this word.

 

Fog can give me a chill.

 

It produces an icy thought.

 

Chills going up and down my spine are both thrilling and

frightening. It can be eerie and baffling, too. Some things

create emotions which give one person chills, while another

one won’t react or show stimulation in their fear zones.

 

definition of “acrostic” is given to mean a poem or other form

of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line

spells out a word or name.

 

Acrostics of alphabet using the theme of Winter, drew a wide

collection from my mind.

 

I numbered each one so I could ask you if you liked any of

these, you may refer to them by number.

Or feel free to use another word as a “springboard” and make

up one of your own.

I chose to use the singular letters adding up to the word:

 

C

H

I

L

L.

 

Let me know if any of these give you ‘chills.’

 

1.

Clouds

Hasten

Icy,

Lacy

Lakes.

 

2.

Clouds

Help

Icicles

Linger

Longer.

 

3. This one I doubled the letters, “CCHHIILLLL!”

(Br-r-r!!)

 

Creeping cold,

Heaping helpings,

Icy igloos,

Latticework licks,

Liquid lightning.

 

4. Again, double the letters, double the challenge:

 

Crisp crystals,

Intricate Icicles,

Lightly laced,

Lazy liquids,

Hilly heaps.

 

5. This one was one that uses a slang meaning of “ice”

or “to be iced.”

(Just in case this doesn’t translate to another language; it means

‘kill’ or ‘to murder.’)

I like to think of it as a dramatic, yet simple way of expressing

ending a love affair:

 

Cold

Heart

Iced

Love

Lost.

 

*The above five little playful uses of “chill” letters are my

own creations. Please give me credit for the silly word

sets of acrostic poems, if you should wish to use them.

~reocochran thanks you!

 

When my kids were going through middle school, they used

this often expressed combination of two words. It is a friendly

and caring expression, using the word, “chill,” in it:

 

“Did you forget to take your ‘chill pill?'”

“Boy, that man needs to take a ‘chill pill!'”

 

In the seventies, we probably didn’t create or originate the way

my friends and I would use this word:

“Hey, ‘chill’ out!”

“You need to ‘chill,’ man!”

This meant to let the other person know in a non-threatening

manner, to calm down or relax.

 

Isn’t it funny how we may ask someone to “refrigerate something”

for us, but if we have something special, we may ask them to “Put

it on ice” or “This needs to be chilled before serving.”

I sometimes forget that red wines are supposed to be served at

room temperature, while leftover wine usually is placed in the fridge.

 

When you think of an icy situation, you may wish to handle it in

a different manner than a chilly situation. I feel that “icy” people

are very much frozen and cannot change. Somehow, though, I

feel there is more ‘lee- way’  in ‘chilly’ people. Any thoughts on

why?

 

When it is really cold outside, we all wish to bundle up. We

may wish to serve warm soup or sip on a hot drink.

Why do we love to make big pots or Crock Pots of something

that is hot, sometimes meaty and nutritious? This is due to

wishing to create warmth throughout our body.

But, wait. . .

Tell me this. . .

Why is one of our favorite toasty warm meals called, “Chili?”

 

When my grandchildren, who I nickname and often call my

“Grandies” whisper in my ear, it tickles my fancy. It gives me

little goosebumps and it makes me warm all over. This gives

me sweet and innocent ‘chills,’ too.

 

When a man is wishing to be romantic, or is a special part of

my life, he may whisper in a theater, the ‘chills’ are more of

a sensual and arousing kind. Maybe it is due to Pavlov’s

theory of using an impetus and an outcome. It is like such a

wonderful prelude, beginning to what may come later on.

 

My favorite middle of the night thought about “chill” was this

funny one. It is a ‘great rhyming word for First Graders.’

 

Have I got you thinking about “chill” or “chills?”

 

Did you think of a five or six word collection that creates

an acrostic for either of these words?

 

Last but not least, do you forgive me for bringing up this

‘touchy’ subject while Winter may circle back and freeze

us out?

 

I saved it until I saw Spring was just around the corner.

 

We are going to have a “Heat Wave” this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wisdom Through the Ages

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Sometimes philosophy can be found on posters, bumper stickers,

t-shirts and other forms of public media. I found these precious

and funny bits of wisdom tucked into a circulated email. If you have

already received this set of “Great Truths” before, please don’t give

up on my writing original material very soon. . .

 

“Great Truths Little Children Have Learned:

1. No matter how hard you try, you can’t baptize cats.

2. When your Mom is mad at your Dad, don’t let her brush your hair.

3. If you sister or brother hits you, don’t hit your sibling back. They

always catch the second person. (“She did it first” doesn’t work in

school either.)

4. Never ask your 3 year old brother to hold a tomato or a wriggly

kitten.

5. You cannot trust dogs to watch your food. Even if they are guard

dogs.

6. Don’t sneeze when someone is cutting your hair.

7. Never hold a Dust Buster and a pet or a bowl of cereal at the same

time.

8. You can’t hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk. Cutting brussel

sprouts into tiny bits doesn’t make it appear invisible either.

9. Don’t wear patterned underwear (polka dots) under white shorts or

slacks.

10. The best place to be when you are sad is Mommy, Daddy, Grandma

or Grandpa’s lap.”

 

“Great Truths Adults Have Learned:

1. Raising teenagers is like nailing Jell-O to a tree.

2. Wrinkles don’t hurt.

3. Families are like fudge. . . mostly sweet but a little nutty.

4. Today’s mighty oak is just yesterday’s nut that held its ground.

5. Laughing is good exercise. It’s like jogging on the inside.

6. Middle age is when you choose cereal for its fiber content

rather than the sweet flavor, coupon or toy inside.”

(Did you notice the list is getting smaller, as we age?)

 

“Great Truths About Growing Old:

1. Growing up is mandatory; growing old is optional.

2. Forget the health food. We need all the preservatives we can get.

3. When you fall down, you wonder what else you can do while you

are already down here.

4. You are getting old, when you get the same sensation from a

rocking chair or a porch swing that you once got on a merry go

round or a roller coaster.

 

Hope you also enjoy the following word plays and don’t mind

if they are a little “Pun- ny.”

 

1. “The sole purpose of a child’s middle name is so he or she can

tell when he is really in trouble.”

 

2. “Birds of a feather flock together. . .

and then use your car as target practice.”

 

3. “The older you get, the tougher it is to lose weight,

because by then your body and your fat have gotten

to be really good friend.”

 

4. “The easiest way to find something lost around the

house, is to purchase its replacement.”

 

5. “He who hesitates is probably right.”

 

6. For those over 40 years old, did you ever notice the

Roman Numerals for forty are:  “XL?”

 

7. Did you ever notice when you put the two words

“THE” and “IRS” together they spell, “THEIRS?”

 

8. Going along with this thought:

“A penny saved is a Government oversight.”

 

Now, to close with two “Maxine” comic strip comments:

9. “I can rise and shine,

but not at the same time.”

 

10. “Ever feel like you’ve had too much coffee?

Me neither.”

 

Happy Valentine’s Day funnies from “Maxine”

illustrated and written by John Wagner:

 

~**~ “The only thing better than a guy (or gal)

with chocolate is just the chocolate.” ~**~

 

~**~ “A box of chocolates is calling me. . .

which is more than my last boyfriend did.” ~**

Threads

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For those of us who are approaching winter, there are some moments

when we may wish to start a large puzzle, work on a craft or read a

book with deeper meaning. After all, the media ‘invented’ the idea of

Summer Books, which always seem like “Beach Books.” They consist

of fun reads, some adventures or romance but generally not expected

to make it into the Classic books area of the library.

While gathering things, somewhat ‘ahead of time,’ preparing for my

Thanksgiving trip to see my Mom and family up North, I put a box of

old wooden spools of thread into a bag. Or rather ones that used to

have thread on them. I added one of my books from the discards

pile at the May Library Book Sale, in coordination with the Delaware

Arts Festival, thinking that I may get a chance over the four days “on

holiday” to bury my nose in a book. The spools will go to my brother’s

future artistic projects. He utilized another set of these antique

wooden spools in a colorful multi-media project, finishing it with

a shiny paint spattered glaze over it. I love the circular shapes within

the circle of  his shimmering presentation of what I would describe

as the “cosmos.”

 

While talking about thread, I don’t wish to go on too many tangents.

 

Do you remember when we would say, “Nice threads?” Sometimes,

I remember saying this to someone with a tie-dyed shirt or a pretty

patch-worked maxi-skirt. Was it applicable only to certain kinds

of clothes or anyone who we may have thought looked “nice?”

Interesting, since we also use the word “threadbare” clothes, for

those which may be considered ‘raggedy’ or worn out. These are

‘bones of contention’ sometimes, when a spouse may wish to keep

a favorite, softened by time item of clothing. The other spouse

may wish to throw it in the ‘rags’ heap.

 

 

Now that I am getting older, I sometimes have to close one of

my eyes to “thread” a needle. I also recently purchased a package

of needles that remind me of the Large Print Books’ section where

I tend to get some of my ‘reading for pleasure’ books. Rarely do I

find ‘classics’ in this area. I pondered this once, “Do they think

that while I am losing my eyesight, I am becoming ‘dimmer’ in

my brain cells, too?” In this same vein, my “threads” of thoughts

can become quite twisted or knotted up, needing someone to

help unravel them.

 

When a spider creates his web, the intricate woven pattern looks

like snowflakes at times. Sometimes, I think of it as gossamer

“thread” and am amazed at how strong its hold is. Especially,

when in someone’s attic, as it catches in your hair. It is definitely

sticky, which makes sense to catch the bugs or flies for the spider’s

meal.

 

While the use of ‘threading in and out’ is less often used than the

expression of ‘weaving in and out,’ I have heard this used.

 

Can you think of other ways the word, “thread” is used?

 

I especially admire the Native Americans who used almost every

part of an animal, one way or another. Using creatures’ sinew

to sew with a needle created from its bone is surely a testament

of their creative and utilitarian minds. I cannot imagine trying

to poke through the fur or animal hide to create clothes and

jackets. It would have been easier to just throw the fur over their

shoulders like a blanket or poncho. That is how I picture my

way of ‘roughing it.’ The daunting task of creating homes out

of materials from the natural world is incredible to me also.

 

I have 15 different wooden spool brand names with the prices

varying from 15 cents to a quarter. I studied and grouped them,

even noticing the colors or as they are labeled, “shades” can be

over 1000 in their number. The variety intrigued me, as I hope

or felt it may a few of my readers. All of the 15 brands are made

in America. I would be interested if anyone in another country

would tell me where their thread in their sewing basket or junk

drawer was made.

 

When you ‘whet’ someone’s interest in a subject, you don’t

wish to leave them “hanging by a thread,” so here is my list:

1. Clark’s brand.

This is interesting because it was originally on its own, but you will

see a spool with two brands who must have become connected. On

this post, I decided would be presenting what I have, not what I

looked up on the internet. I did not research any of these companies.

Details on the Clark’s wooden spool include, “Cotton” and “O.N.T.”

and the “shade” number of 278 on one of several of these. The “Size

50” is on this brand.

2. “Belding Corticelli” brand.

The words are not together, but circle the spool, some on the

‘top’ and some on the ‘bottom.’

“Bel-waxed”

“Mercerized”

“Cotton”

and the expression, “Fast to Boiling.”

Several of this brand, with the price range given of 15 cents, 19 cents

and 25 cents.

The shades are stamped into the wood, ink pressed to show “1707”

on one, for example. The “Size 50” is also on this brand. All of these

gave the length of “125 yds.” of thread.

3. “Sea Island Thread Mfg. Corp.”

The words, “None Better” are stamped into the wood on one end.

The length on this bigger sized spool is “700 yds.” It is labeled,

“Mercerized Cotton.” (Unlike the other spool where the words

were separated and not contiguous.) This is mentioned to be,

“Made in New York.”

4. “Standard- Coosa-Thatcher Company” is also labeled on

the other end of the spool as “S-C-T”

There is no marking of its shade, color, or length but I am

happy to tell you this was made in “Chattanooga, Tenn.”

5. “Richardson’s .”

“Mercerized Sewing Cotton,”

(Size 50)

100 yards

“Fast to Boiling.”

This singular spool has the word, “Shade 1788,” on it.

6. “Fruit of the Loom.”

40 yds.

(Size 50)

“Mercerized” (no mention of cotton on label.)

“Fast Color”

*Would we today call this ‘color fast?’*

7. “Dandy” brand.

This label is the only one which presents a blend of,

“Cotton and Polyester”

Made in U.S.A. is stamped into the wooden spool’s end.

“Mercerized” is again not connected with the source of

the thread’s ‘material.’

“Boil Fast”

*Doesn’t this fascinate you? How can one expression, “Fast

to Boiling,” be attributed to one kind and then, this shorter

one be given?*

There are two facts about the “Dandy” brand which are not

included on any other of my spools, “Left Twist” and “Two

Cord- 1200 yards.” This is a longer/taller wooden spool.

8. “Ball’s Best” brand.

This was made in South Willington, Connecticut.

“500 yards”

“Cotton”

(24) May be “shade” number?

Gardiner Hall Jr. Company.

“Sole Man’ers”

*(Was this meant to be used on soles of socks or shoes?)*

9. “Coats” brand.

“Super Sheen With Silicone” on a shiny paper circle on top.

125 yds.

“Mercerized”

“Boilfast”

(50)

19 cents.

Shades are “169” “70” and “57-A”

On the bottom of the spool, where there isn’t any shiny label,

stamped into the wood is: “J + P Coats.”

10. “Lily” brand.

“Mercerized.”

50 yds.

Cotton boll symbol on the paper label.

“Boil – Fast”

11. “Radium” brand.

“1 oz.”

“Three Cord”

“Mercerized Cotton”

“Color 1169”

12. “Aunt Lydia’s” brand,

“American Thread Co.”

“Button & Carpet”

“Extra Strong + Smooth”

“Shade 830”

13. “Empeco” brand.

“Mercerized Thread”

“Manufactured by Max Pollack Co. Inc.”

Made in “Mills Groton, CONN”

“700 yards”

Color “518.”

14. “Coats + Clarks”

(At last, we have both companies joined together.)

Time has gone past, since this big spool is labeled

to cost, “39 cents” and has details, such as:

“Dressmaker’s Spool”

“Made in U.S.A”

(50)

Color or shade is “86-B”

15. “Talon” brand.

“Mercerized.”

325 yds.

“29 cents”

“Made in U.S.A.”

“Colorfast” (at last!)*

15. “Star” brand.

“100% Polyester”

40 yds.

“American Thread Co.”

“CONN”

(An area code is given, but is faded. Possibly 06905 or 08905?)

“Will-Boil”

Three different spools have these color numbers:

“484” “553” and “020”

The three have varying length of thread:

“40 yds.” “125 yds.” and “150 yds.”

“Mercerized Cotton”

I enjoy learning about the crafts and hobbies of fellow bloggers.

Do you tend to carry out the same kinds of activities or do you

change them, as the season changes?

This post began with my getting out some things to go visiting;

along with sorting out the spools from my crowded sewing basket.

I accomplished the chore of cleaning up and writing this post about

‘threads’ due to those wooden spools. My little grandchildren used

to play stacking games with them, as if they were uniquely shaped

building blocks. Remembering their tall towers of spools make me

smile. Then, the giggles of when they all came tumbling down.

I imagine children in the past doing this playful use of spools, too.

 

 

 

 

 

Everything’s Coming Up Roses

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When things are going well, you may have heard and used the expression,

“Everything’s coming up roses.” Right? As I wished to look up the history of

this expression, I found out from Google “Search Engine,” that the more

frequently used slang expression is, “Everything’s coming up Milhouse.”

Did you know this? Where in the world did this one come from? It came

from the animated, long-lasting television show, “The Simpsons.” There

is a positive character who is always thinking life is just ‘swell’ and his name

is Milhouse.

Why isn’t the song, “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” at the top of the list of

expressions? This was Ethel Merman’s song from the 1959 musical, “Gypsy.”

The musical play was loosely based on the life of Gypsy Rose Lee. When asked,

my oldest daughter calls this guy, “Milhouse,” a “Goober-head.” Also, she

pointed out that the first choice of things is based on searches, while the movie

and song may have been popular, more people are familiar with the Simpsons.

 

I ask my oldest daughter why is “Milhouse” a “Goober head?” As soon as she

starts to explain what a goober head is, I think of the character named “Goober”

from the television show, “The Andy Griffith Show.” Where did this slang ‘word

set’ really come from? In my mind and memory, my  first impression evokes the

character, “Goober,” who was a goofy character.

 

She says it does not have anything to do with the historic and iconic show. It also

doesn’t have anything to do with the chocolate covered peanuts, also known as,

“Goobers.” Two generations try to figure out where the expression, “Goober-head”

came from. Did it just evolve from the Andy G. show or is it entirely “new” as the

weird expression, bringing up this Milhouse, is to me?

 

A person you call a “goober” is a “kindhearted, slightly oblivious person” who

also is considered a “lovable goofball.” An example of a “goober head” is “one

who puts an empty carton of milk into the refrigerator.” I thought this was a

teenager!

(This may be found online in the “Urban Dictionary.”)

 

There is no reference to “Goober” Pyle, who is from the show, “The Andy Griffith

Show,” if you look “goober head” up. But when you type the word in to look up

“Goober,” you will find out more about him. Goober was played by the actor,

George Lindsey who read for the part of Gomer Pyle, but was instead chosen to

play the less featured character, Gomer’s cousin. I always liked both Jim Nabors

who was chosen to play Gomer. Did you know both of these likeable and humorous

character actors came from the state of Alabama? Jim Nabors sang on variety shows

and albums, too.

 

N0w, off on another ‘wild goose chase,’ where one strand of thought or while using

one internet pathway takes you off to discover that peanuts are indeed called,

‘goobers.’ Along with these extra facts explaining there is a song about “goober

peas”‘ and another called, “goober grapes.”

This helps you to finally understand why there are two kinds of jars of mixed

peanut butter and jelly made by Smucker’s. They are called, “Goober Jelly.”

Each one features peanut butter and either strawberry or grape jelly contained

within its own jar creating ‘stripes of flavors.’  My own personal taste trial of the

Smucker’s brand of vertically layered PB & J, determined the texture of peanut

butter is kind of mushy and not as tasty as if made from separate jars. I happen

to like the crunchy peanut butter jars, anyway.

 

So, for a brief fun chase, we went from my heading off to write about roses, since

I really do like to ‘stop and smell the roses,’ outside the Sara Moore Nursing Home

and also the rose bushes by the Lutheran Church, while walking to the library.

 

Then, spontaneously writing out the old 1959 title of the song whose lyrics were

written by Stephen Sondheim for my post’s title. I needed to look the song up to

verify its history and origin, finding it was written in collaboration with Jules Styne,

who wrote the  music for “Everything’s Coming Up Roses.”

 

The most disconcerting part of all this ‘research’ was you cannot be totally

reassured that the song or the expression came first.

Also, while typing “Everything’s coming up…” another way to finish this

expression goes,  “Like a rosy garden.”

Hmmm….

 

Have I lost you yet? I had to reread this, changing it a bit just to prevent

my own self from getting totally lost!

 

By the way, the internet location called, “The Free Dictionary,” gives this

definition of the words, “everything’s coming up roses,” as an ‘idiom’ that

means “someone is having a successful career or day.”

 

I like my world sometimes to be viewed through rose-colored glasses,

while listening to some old songs like,

1. “My Wild Irish Rose” was written in 1899 by Chancellor Olcott for a musical

production. The version I am more familiar with is from the 1947 movie with

the title, “My Wild Irish Rose.” We used to sing this in school and my Mom

loves it so, since her name is “Rosalie.” It is a sentimental song and can also

be heard in a Celtic version that is so sweetly sung.

 

2. “A Rose and a Baby Ruth,” sung by George Hamilton, IV (1956).

3. “Sweet Kentucky Rose,” sung by Kitty Kallen (1955).

4. “Two Dozen Roses,” sung by the group, “Shenandoah.”

5. “The Yellow Rose of Texas,” sung by Johnny Desmond (1955).

6. “Roses Are Red, My Love,” written and sung by Jim Reeves became

most popular in the Bobby Vinton version of this song, (1962).

 

 

Newer songs,

1. “The Rose,” sung by Bette Midler is fantastic as a duet with Ashley Judd.

“The Rose” was both a movie and a song, 1992.

 

2. “Bed of Roses,” sung by Bon Jovi, (1993).

3. “Cracklin’ Rosie,” sung by Neil Diamond, (1971).

 

 

 

Hope you have a rosy week and keep your outlo0k rosy, too.

“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” comes from Shakespeare’s

play, “Romeo and Juliet.” It is discussing the two families names, who are

sworn enemies, along with the two young people who are star-crossed lovers.

 

Tomorrow, more about roses and no sidetracking on the internet!

 

Hope you have a “rosy” week!

Try to keep your outlook, “rosy” and maybe, everything will come up roses for you!

 

Thrift Store and Road Trip Adventures

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The road to almost anywhere seems to take you much longer than the

trip home. My brothers give me directions around Cleveland, forgetting

my crooked path that began on the lake which I call ‘home’ to the small

towns I have lived in and then back again, to visit again. The total number

of years away are much more than the years I lived at ‘home.’ I had lived 6

years in Bowling Green, Ohio, four while attending college and two while

young, newly married and teaching middle school. I spent 5 years farther

south, in Lancaster, Ohio, and a big chunk of 28 years in my chosen (picked

it on a map) location of Delaware, Ohio.

So, we valiantly set off to a short distance away to go shopping. Mom and I

were off on another one of our adventures, traveling around the city streets,

some I have forgotten their names. “Fasten your seat belt, Mom! Hold onto

your hat, since the windows will be down it is such a beautiful and warm

day!”

Mom and I ate lunch out at a casual location, fortifying for our shopping

expedition. So serious, that Mom had made a list and so had I! We were

heading towards Lorain Road (one town over, North Olmsted) from Center

Ridge Road (Westlake). We located the Dr.’s office we would go to on Wed.,

along with the Dr.’s office we would head towards on Thurs. Then, we were

on Busy and much traveled, Dover Center Road. We passed the church where

my early days of Girl Scouts had met, along with a house of where one of my

Mom’s favorite fellow Westlake (Demons) teachers had lived. They live out

West in Colorado, writing letters and exchanging cards with Mom.

When we arrived on Lorain Road, I traveled East first; nope!  Wrong direction!

I saw an outstanding and extraordinarily low priced familiar gas station, where

there were several people, one elderly man who may have been retired, chatting

by the door of the place. It is one where Brazilian coffee has joined the hot brews,

along with my favorite cappuccino mixes. Having had three days of the Senior

Apartment brewed coffee, a little above average and the Maxwell House instant

coffee my Mom drinks all day, I decided to grab a flavored ice tea for Mom and

pre-pay for some gas. I left my Mom’s windows open and locked her in. We gave

a little laugh, since she knows I worry a lot about her memory and her safety, too.

I was told I was only a few hundred feet to get to Dollar General and only two

blocks away from Giant Eagle, whose plaza has a huge Volunteers of America

Thrift Store. I thanked the men who were gathered on the step of the gas station,

and gave the elderly, very genuinely concerned man a brief but sincere hug. He

laughed and said, “You made my day, Honey.”

Once we got in the doors of the V. of A. Thrift Store, we checked carefully for the

“Colors of the Day” chart. I repeated them twice to Mom, since the color of orange

meant 50% off the price tags of that color, the color of green meant a whopping

75% off.

We spent over two hours searching for our own respective list of ‘clothing needs.’

Which for me usually includes dark and patterned shirts and jeans that are ‘not too

tight’ for my warehouse job. She was fascinated by the Halloween decorations, I had

to insist she had her ‘door and shelves covered with October décor.’ Once I had her

steered towards the relaxed pants and turtle necks part of the store, I could head off

into the misses and juniors areas.  I went back to her twice, to find her cart piled

high in clothes she WISHED she could wear. I loved the attitude coming from her,

really like her sparkling belief that she can still wear pants with belts and shirts

with buttons. We had to put the black pin striped suit she wanted to wear ‘to go to

meetings in’ back. I got her to go back one row over where the pants were elastic-

waisted and the shirts were pullovers.

This time I headed off to the Sundries department. It makes you think of a garage

sale or one of those big flea markets that are set up on fairgrounds. Twice I had to

stop people to ask first, for the frames area and then, for the photo albums area.

I found five albums for my grandkids’ photos, various covers and styles from a

big pile of these. I liked the ones I found for the girls, one with flowers, another

with a geometric design and the ones for the boys, one had a red ‘leather’ look

for my oldest, Skyler and another had a green ‘leather’ look for Landen. The

others will be ‘jazzed up’ like I do with dollar store albums, using stickers and

little bit of acrylic paint designs. So much money saved and I may have told you

this summer I printed out 700 photographs, dating back to Fall, 2013. Yikes!

Blogging has taken me away from my usual careful seasonally printing off the

pictures and individually separating them into 6 distinct albums. My grandies

have looked more into their past, then their recent happenings, when they go

to my four foot stack of photo albums, one for each season of their lives.

The other great find was a beautiful mahogany or cherry antique frame to put

my #86 Birthday Gift to my Mother in. I know how much she loves Autumn

leaves and found a beautiful branched photograph, with multiple leaves of

brilliant shades to place a male red cardinal on and the step below him, a

female yellow cardinal perched on a branch. I painted this in watercolors,

starting in early October. The frame was a ‘firm’ price, not one that will be

reduced by its tag, $3.99. What a bargain! I gave my Mom her gift early, since

we have plans for dinner Wednesday with my youngest brother and his wife,

then on Friday with my ‘older’ brother, just 18 months younger than I. (We

ran around in a ‘pack’ from childhood through high school, 3 born in 4 years.)

Here were Mom’s purchases in a list:

1. Four pairs of elastic waist pants,

*Pink ones made of denim material, brand new condition. Mom’s favorite color.

*Blue jeans, a nice dark denim with large, deep pockets. She acknowledged their

benefits by saying,

“Robin, I can put tissues and my keys in this pocket and the doggie bags in the

other one. Some may call them doggie doo doo bags… but I also put her treats

from my dinner in them, too.” (Not at the same time nor same bag, may I add!)

*Black soft cotton material pants with pockets. They may resemble sweat pants,

but she wears this style to bed and to answer the door in the morning.

* Black sturdier, some acrylic/polyester material pants that look ‘dressy’ and less

worn. Mom exclaimed about her next three purchases that would be worn with

these same pants,

“Robin, look at this beautiful jacket for the holidays, this red turtleneck and this

red cowl necked sweater! You will not believe how lucky I was at finding them!”

 

 

Here is the best part of the red plaid wool jacket labeled, Norton McNaughton,

with its black velvet color and such a Scottish printed plaid:

It was marked “99 cents” and happened to be a green tag, so take 75% off and

Mom paid only one quarter for this jacket, with its freshly dry cleaned tag attached.

 

The trip back home was short and sweet, we sipped our tea, (Mom’s) and coffee,

(mine) quite content to bask in our wonderful purchases. We stopped on the way

home to sit in the woods of Bradley Woods Park, looking at the busy squirrels, the

chirping birds and sun glowing colors of Autumn. I pulled out of my purse two

Milky Way bars and two little dark chocolate Hershey kisses. We felt like we were

almost in Heaven.

 

A flyer in Mom’s door had a religious message but I loved the

quote:

“The Clock

The clock of life is wound but once,

and no man has the power

to tell just when the hands will stop

at late or early hour.

To lose one’s wealth is sad indeed,

To lose one’s health is more.

To lose one’s soul is such a loss

That no one can restore.”

(Author Unknown, found on a religious tract)

 

*As far as I am concerned,

in this poem, the word,  “soul”

can mean our enthusiasm and

sometimes Grace. ~Robin E. O. Cochran

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, So Lovely x Two!

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For some reason, possibly my love of musicals, the song,

“I Feel Pretty” comes to mind when I hear the words

“One Lovely Blog” Award!

(Do you remember the movie scene when Natalie Wood is

singing this in “West Side Story?”)

How about another musical reference?

“Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” while Eliza Doolittle is imagining a much better

life than being a flower cart girl. This is from another of my favorites,

“My Fair Lady.”

Last but not least, Cole Porter gave us a lovely combination of songs,

one which was made into a movie with Kevin Kline, the actor, playing

the musical composer and lyricist’s life story. “Delovely” makes me think

of how fun the world could be if we thought everything was ‘delightful’

and ‘delovely.’

One Lovely Blog Award nomination was given to me by Soul N Spirit blog,

by Rashmi, who is a sweetheart of a woman, sharing her travels, faith and

perspective on Life at:

http://soulnspirit.com

Kim also surprised me by nominating me for the One Lovely Blog Award.

These two women are beautiful inside and out. I am blessed by knowing

them and hope you will enjoy reading their posts.

You may find Kim’s Chronic Conditions and Life Lessons thoughts at:

http://kimgosselinblog.com

 

This post could include two quotes that mean a lot to me. I usually ‘wax

poetic’ when I get nominated for awards, never dreaming when I signed

up to create a “Free blog of thoughts on my wacky dating experiences”

then getting more serious, establishing my real reason for writing,

“Relationships Reveal Our Hearts.” Soon, I was finding humanity in all

aspects of the local scenery, the Midwestern states and finally, the world.

 

“Don’t cry because it is over,

Smile because it happened.”

(This means a lot to me, since I do try to smile despite the different ups and

downs in life. Author not given his/her due, when found this quote…)

 

“We could learn a lot from Crayons:

Some are sharp.

Some are pretty.

Some are dull.

Some have unique names.

(Interesting stories to tell.)

All are different shades and colors.

But they all exist very nicely in the same box.”

(I tinkered with this often passed around quote.)

 

The rules for awards to me, mean you should thank the one who gave you

the nomination. It doesn’t mean in a whole post, just in their comments’

section.

You should appreciate they have hundreds of choices out there, they decided

to choose to pass this one on to you.

 

This is to give you a ‘nod’ and a ‘pat on the back’ to let you know you are

appreciated and noticed.

 

1. Carol

http://writersdream9.wordpress.com

2. Mikial

http://mikialmillard.com

3. Catherine

http://artourway.com

4. Sherri

http://sherrimatthewsblog.com

5. Tokidoki with Jacqueline

http://jacquelinemhadel.wordpress.com

6. Michelle

http://michellemarieantellg.worpress.com

7. Humor:

http://fatbottomfiftiesgetfierce.com

8. find art and spiritual interests, like karma:

http://etherealpaints.wordpress.com

9. Nancy

http://nrhatch.wordpress.com

10. Find journalism and art here:

http://chaptertk.com

11. photos

http://russellrayphotos2.com

12. Ian

http://aussieemu.wordpress.com

13. Dianna

http://thesedaysofmine.com

14. Ashley

http://ashleyomelia.com

15. Emily

http://keysandopenmind.wordpress.com

 

Explore and enjoy these lovely blogs!

 

Fool’s Gold

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I was listening to the Beatles’ song, “The Fool on the Hill,” and then comparing it,

in my mind to, “A Fool in the Rain” sung by Led Zeppelin. All of a sudden, I realized

there can be a few ways that you can interpret the word, “Fool.” In the first song, it

means to be sad that you were made a ‘fool’ of, in love. The second song’s melody

is to a more upbeat tempo. Led Zeppelin’s song depicts being carefree enough to act

foolish. I like this idea of expressing your love through silly ways.

 

I like the idea of words and their interpretations. I have carried this out in a few of my

past different posts. (The Meaning of Regret, Patience, and others…) Definitions are

something I like to write and read about, especially  when I find out there are more

variations than I ever imagined. Also, the ‘roots’ of words interest me, too. I took a

course titled, “Etymology,” which I wish could have lasted much longer.

 

The definitions (and derivations) of fool:

(noun)- A person who acts unwisely or imprudently; a silly person.

A more archaic definition (noun)- A person who was formerly kept in

a noble or royal household, for casual entertainer; also, ‘jester.’

 

(verb)- Trick or deceive (someone); dupe.

A more casual definition (verb)- To spend time idly or aimlessly, as in

‘fooling away’ time.

Another casual interpretation (verb)- To spend money or trifles (‘to fool

away’ or ‘fritter,’) without advantage. This was also characterized as to

meddle thoughtlessly or tamper.

 

(adjective)- Informal usage: Foolish or silly.

 

What a ‘fool’ she is over that man!

 

When I quoted how dogs accept us when we act like ‘fools’ on Wednesday, 9/16/14,

by Samuel Butler. It mentioned dogs don’t mind joining us in this frivolity, I started

thinking about writing this post.

 

I like this use of the word, “foolish:”

The clown wore a ‘foolish’ little hat on top of his bushy red hair! (Bozo or Ronald

McDonald, come to mind.)

 

I don’t like this use of ‘fool:’

Don’t fool with that loaded gun!

 

Unfortunately, Scripture leaves us with negative connotations of “fool:”

“Wicked,” “depraved,” “senseless,” and “dullard” are given references in the Bible,

implying to be foolish is all of these horrible things.

 

What about that delicious dessert labeled, “fool?”  Isn’t it too delicious to be

considered a part of the word’s definition? I love the layering of angel food or

other flavored cakes, with fruit and whipped cream… Yummy! I have to give

this interpretation a ‘positive’ rating!

 

What about the way we celebrate April first, “Happy April Fool’s Day!” Isn’t

this a positive and fun-filled day? I think back of the tricks I played and had

played on me, they seem more friendly and evoke happy memories.

 

In this same light-hearted manner, my grandkids like to say, “I fooled you, Nana!”

This can come when they hide something, when they play a ‘magic trick’ on me

or when they tell a ‘fib’ and it is usually ‘outlandish!’ All are positives, through

my starry eyes of love.

 

When I was in my teens, some of us would say, “So and so is “fooling around”

with someone else.” It usually meant ‘sex,’ but sometimes it was also, meant

to include ‘being unfaithful’ to another person.

How do you ‘view’ this expression?

Can someone be ‘tinkering’ with their car and still say they are ‘fooling around?’

 

I used to feel that this was a positive compliment, when a friend would say,

“We can’t ‘fool’ you, Robin!”

 

Sometimes I think of myself being sort of pitiful, in terms of, “He sure did ‘fool’

me, though. Never could have seen that happen!”

 

Other times, I would say what kind of ‘fools’ we all are, when we believe a

politician or a famous actor’s lines.

 

Fool’s Paradise = delirious happiness.

Fool’s Gold = pyrite.

 

Often expressed words,

“A fool and his money are soon parted.”

 

“Fools rush in… where angels fear to tread.”

There are several references that come to mind, when I hear this quote.

The first one comes to mind, since I am a huge movie buff, along with liking

this movie plot is: “Fool’s Rush In.” This is a well done comedy, with several

serious underlying themes. First is, don’t do things while under the influence

of alcohol, or you may face consequences. The second is, you may find out

you like someone, once daylight hits, after all. Matthew Perry and Salma Hayek

are both interesting and amusing in this overall fun-loving movie.

The next thing that comes to mind,  is the song, “Fools Rush In (Where Angels

Fear to Tread,” written by Johnny Mercer, (1940). Yes, I wanted to find who were

the ones who sang this song, but my first memory of this song, was Ricky Nelson’s

version.

There have been dozens of famous people who have sung this popular song! The

first singer was Tony Martin. Then came The Glenn Miller Band,  with Ray Eberle

singing. Then came The Tommy Dorsey Band with Frank Sinatra singing this.

After that the remakes were about 20 years later, where it re-surfaced in 1960,

with someone named Brook Benton singing it. In 1962, (I would love this version!)

came Etta James. Also, in 1962, Doris Day sang a duet with Andre Previn of this

song.  Finally, the version that I know, with an upbeat tempo and a little ‘rock’

flair was sung by Ricky Nelson. (I still love his “Garden Party” song, don’t you?)

In 1971, Elvis Presley decided to include “Fools Rush In” in an album. There are

many more people, some I have never heard of, but needless to say, this is a very

popular song. I sure hope that the heirs of Johnny Mercer, collected some of the

royalties on this song!

 

I will sometimes remember how Eliza Doolittle says, “What a fool am I. . .” in the

song, “Without You.” (“My Fair Lady”)

 

A ‘shout out’ to my best use of matchmaking EVER: Happy 20th Wedding Anniversary,

Jenny and Dave! (My story about this is titled, “Love Found in a Video Store.” Yes,  I

found Dave, but had to call a few people to ‘identify’ him, while setting him up with my

good friend, Jenny.) Here’s to many more foolish times, fun and exciting adventures,

you two fun-loving people!

 

Hope you found more ‘gold’ here than ‘fool’s gold!’

 

I like to picture all my fellow bloggers  ‘fooling around,’ whistling, singing and enjoying

the sunny weather together! Let’s go on a hike with a picnic at the end of the trail. . .

 

 

When you think of the words, ‘fool’ and ‘foolish’ do you think of people who are young,

any age or elderly?

When you hear the word, ‘fool,’ does a song pop into your head?

Or if those questions don’t make you imagine something, can you remember a time you

felt ‘like a fool’ or ‘foolish?’ What age were you? If you wish to share a personal example,

feel free to give us one.