Category Archives: Mediterranean Sea

Roses, roots, and thorns

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The letters in the word, “rose” can be rearranged to spell “Eros.” How appropriate

that one of the most beautiful flowers has the letters who form the Greek “God of

Love.” The Peace rose was named 50 or more years ago. It is a pale yellow-tinged

rose with pink tipped petals.  Thorns can also help you to reach another letter

combination: “sore.” You may be sore from the needle-like thorns or you may be

sore, filled with heartache. While the rose still gives us light and lovely radiance

in its flowering.

 

In the 15th century, Henry VI declared a War of Roses. How sad and upsetting to

label anything that is filled with death and killing, with the word, rose, in its title.

 

In Medieval times, a white rose suspended from the ceiling of a room meant there

would be ‘secrets’ shared or imparted. It designated conversations which must be

totally private. The term, “subrosa,”  means “confidential.”

 

Roses have been found much longer ago than Medieval times. There were drawings

of flowers on cave walls. Particularly, historically discovered on cave walls, was

a five-petaled “rose” drawing found in Crete during the period of 1450 B.C.

 

Traveling even farther back in time, roses have been discovered by archaeologists,

in fossilized form. The rocks have been preserved and photographed have come

from the beginning of Earth’s plant life, possibly the oldest ‘flower’ ever. This is

dating back 30 million years ago. One could almost, truthfully, exclaim that roses

have been around forever.

 

In 76 A.D., the Roman writer named, Pliny, included 30 different remedies and

medicines derived from roses. Roses were used in ancient times for healing wounds,

treating insomnia (rose tea), stomach disorders and “toothaches.” Rose petals also

helped to cover the awful smell of death or illness. By scattering rose petals around

enclosed spaces, you could tolerate the odor of diseases, including the Plague.

 

 

 

In the Talmud, it is written only pink roses were allowed to bloom in Jerusalem.

The city’s name means, “Paradise,” which makes sense the pink roses be there

to fill the air with their aromatic, floral scent. Visually and using senses of all kinds,

to be immersed in Paradise. This is how some gardeners feel in their gardens.

 

The 13th century rose was brought back to Europe, from the Holy Land crusaders.

This is considered “the Old European” traditional rose. Another ‘root’ history of

the rose is it may have come form Italian travelers, from the Gulf of Salerno. The

trail of the rose, also has possibilities with the Roman Emperors cultivating them

after bringing them back from their Middle East travels.

 

The Chinese have incorporated roses in their artistry and have been given credit

for those beautiful “tea roses,” since they have for 1000’s of years compared the

scent to the aroma of the hearty tea leaves.

 

Explorers of the 1800’s, also have been considered ones who brought the first

seedlings of roses from Asia. These explorers brought these to Europe, which

then American settlers brought seeds of all kinds of plants, including seedlings

of roses to our continent. While traveling across the ocean, in 1692, explorers

discovered roses prevented sea-sickness.

 

The belief of the rose as an aphrodisiac is more than just a romantic novel’s

idea. The appearance of this belief goes back centuries using rose hips as

part of a mood enhancer. The rose hips are also known to have Vitamin

C which is considered a natural way to help prevent depression. It is also

considered to be a way to prevent ‘apathy’ and ‘resignation,’ in books of

old folklore and medicinal texts.

 

Marie Antoinette’s good friend, Pierre Joseph-Redoute, was a wonderful painter

and artist, along with being one who enjoyed gardening. One of his famous rose

paintings is hung in one of the French Art museums. The artist is known for his

botanical paintings, which have become made into prints for decorating homes,

along with the Palace. In France, roses are included in 12th century cathedral

stained glass windows.

 

In the story, “Sleeping Beauty,” the rose vines with their thorny protection make

it very difficult for the Prince to wake Beauty from her sleep. The vines grow and

surround the castle while she is deep in slumber.

 

Withering roses mean that love is transitory and love can fade. There are many

ways the flower is used as a metaphor  in books, poetry and stories. Blue roses

come from a gene from a blue petunia injected into a white rose. I think you may

remember in the play, “The Glass Menagerie,” the brother calls the invalid sister,

“Blue Roses,” which indicate the possibility that she has pleurisy.  Australia was

the country given credit for having the clever horticulturalists and scientists who

managed to ‘create’ this blue rose. Symbolism of the rose would take many pages

of writing, along with intensive research.

 

When Carl Jung analyzed a rose depicted in a church stained-glass window with a

magical circle surrounding the rose, he described it in quite mythological terms.

Jung said the rose symbolized,

“Our mortal yearnings for Union with the Cosmos.”

 

Dreamers sometimes are accused of looking through “rose colored glasses,” which at

times, sometimes I prefer them.

 

The expression, “second hand rose,” may have its roots from the days when Henry II’s

mistress (who would have been considered ‘second class’ or less worthy of his time,

since the wife was given preferential treatment) died an early death. Poor Rosamunda.

 

Tough times or parts of our life that are challenging make our lives, “No bed of roses.”

 

“Rosy” cheeks may depict a ‘picture of good health,’ as the children in the Campbell

Soup advertisements display round, rosy cheeks  while they entice us to warm up with

their product.

 

The oldest living rose bush is the size of a tree. This may be found by a cathedral in

Hildesheim, Germany. There is a historic document which provides proof of it dating

back to possibly 815 A.D. It is considered, “The Thousand Year Old Rose Tree.”

The story or legend of the Lower Saxony, Germany tree, is that during WWII, the

bush caught on fire from Allied bombs. The root system was removed, undamaged.

It is still flourishing and flowering in Hildesheim, Germany.

 

From the history of roses through the ages, it seems that they are meant to continue

to grow against all odds. While we are meant to benefit not only from their beauty and

romance, but admire their longevity and endurance. The Peace rose radiates its power

of Hope to us all. The rose holds a special place in our lives and it is amazing to learn

from its very existence.

Roses have flourished from the beginning of time and will continue to do so,

until the Earth stops spinning.

~reocochran 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Escape to the Islands!

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While walking into our distribution center this morning,

I noted that there were several of the “kids” (anyone under

30) in their shorts and their tank tops. They had sweatshirts

that zipped up over this attire. While we were doing our

morning exercises, they were already peeling those off! Then,

in my work zone, that I was assigned to work, I found that

someone on ‘nights’ had turned on the fans! They were blowing

profusely! Brrr!

Not even on the ‘low’ level!

Come on, everyone! I have a sense of humor about it,

once I turn off the fans and start working… Then,

on the way to break, I saw Native American Ted, he

was wearing a brightly colored tropical shirt. All

of this ‘fun and carefree’ attire made me start to

hum the words to the Beach Boys’ song, “Kokomo.”

“Aruba… Jamaica, ooh, I wanna take ya…Bermuda…”

This song was released in 1988 timed for the movie

release of Tom Cruise’s “Cocktail.” I had to laugh

when I accidentally whispered the words too loudly

and Darryl asked me if I were going to travel to

all of those islands! Guess what? There are people

who do just that!

Here are my favorite islands, some I have been to

and some I have YET to go visit the delightful

scenery. Nallorca, (in the Mediterranean) yes, I have

been blessed as a teenager to have that thrown into

our Spanish Club trip… Bahamas, Hawaii, Aldives,

Puerto Rico, the Florida Keys and Aruba are on my new

islands’ tour bucket list!

Describing an idyllic set of crescent shaped islands down

in Florida will come a little more easily than the teens’

island cruise in the Mediterranean Sea. My ‘newer, fresher’

memories are since I was a fully grown adult when we went to

‘play’ down there!

If you wish to travel there, going in the fall will help your

ability to find a place to stay. You may drive to Ft. Meyer’s

Beach and stay there for less money and fine accommodations.

Staying on Sanibel Island was satisfyingly self-indulgent!

You will find the coconut palms, migratory birds and other

wonderful island ‘elements’ on Sanibel or Captiva Islands.

I will start with looking for sea shells and which beaches

were the best to see them. It is a great place to exercise,

by bending and squatting to pick up shells. Also, you may

rent bicycles to further explore the islands.

There is nothing better, (almost) than digging one’s toes

into cool, wet sand on a hot day. As you will find warm,

clean, fine white sand along these beaches it is easy to

spot the larger shells particularly. The two beaches I was

fortunate to rest, on my behind in the sand, on and search

fervently for shells to take home were on the mid-Island

beach called “Bowman’s Beach” and on the eastern point,

“Lighthouse Beach.” It is also a immeasurable pleasure to

have a towel, book and hat with a wide brim to provide

welcome shade on your book you may wish to read and revel

in the atmosphere, too.

In the tidal pools and bright blue water with azure skies,

sometimes not a cloud to be found… you may find this list

of shells:

Alphabet cones of brown and white with spots.

Tellins of rosy pink and peachy colors.

Scallops of patchy calico patterns, my favorites are a mix

of caramel, brown and white. These have ridges on them.

Conch shells are those ones that look like horns, you can

hear the ocean in them the best!

Angel wings, try to find some pairs. I have a card with 20

of these sets glued on it, that my Grandmother Mattson took

days to collect and my Grandfather wrapped first in tissue,

then with bubble wrap and finally brown paper-packaged with

my name and address when I was in third grade. You bet, I

took that pretty card with “shell butterflies” to school to

show off! (Every time I see special shells, I remember their

little trailer, close to Clearwater Beach. I have wonderful

memories of the Gulf side of Florida. The ocean is more of

a New England memory, for me…)

Lightning whelks are grey, silvery on the inside and have some

different patterns, all swirly and unique.

There are the occasional jelly fish, watch out, crabs,

not to eat! You can purchase them at restaurants and/or

enjoy the fresh seafood there!

With the sea gulls flying and possible dolphin sightings,

this is a wonderful place filled with nature. Sunsets with

cool, iced drinks that feature little umbrellas and fruity

‘ka-bobs’ on long skewers or a simple, chilled glass of your

favorite beer (or wine cooler) are such awesome sources of

rejuvenation. Well, at least I always feel younger, while

sipping one of these! Smile!

Each little tiki bar will have the tunes of the Beach Boys,

Barry Manilow, Bruno Mars or Jimmy Buffett playing, sometimes

you may develop an ear “worm” from listening to them! A newer

“Island Song,” by the Zac Brown Band (August, 2012) is one of

my new favorites! My old favorite one, “Island Girl,” sung by

Elton John (released in 1975) can just get me up and dancing,

slowly in the arms of a stranger… My mind wanders off…

Here is a practical list of conditions and suggestions to find

more shells (wherever you are vacationing!)

1. Usually one hour before to one hour after low tide. You

will need to check local tide charts.

2. Weather factors that all increase your chances for more

shells, are a) cold spells, b) storms, and c) new or full moons.

3. Another fantastic adventure to find sea shells, is to go

snorkeling! See the bottom of the ocean, the sea life, unique

fish and gaze upon fresh, living shells. Of course, your

common sense will tell you it is illegal to take a living

shell. It will stink on your way home, if you accidentally

found one inhabited.

The two kinds of birds that are less likely to be found in

Ohio, for example, are white pelicans and cormorants. We

see blue and white herons, along with egrets up on Lake

Erie and around Alum Creek, too. On my good friend, Bill’s

Mill Street you can look down from the bridge and see

a couple of herons with their feet in the cold Mills Creek,

these days!

If you are a painter, you may wish to bring a portable easel

or if a sketcher, you may wish to bring an artist’s pad of

paper (sketch book) or if your craft is writing, take your

journal. Although, you ‘are on vacation,’ it doesn’t mean

you cannot practice your ‘art’ or ‘craft!’

Local museums and shops on islands are also places you may

find more than souvenirs. You may wish to bring more exotic

items, like shells that have been made into wares, such

as jewelry: necklaces, bracelets for wrist and ankles

and earrings, too. I once brought a gorgeous shell mobile

home and hung it over my baby’s window sill. It brought her

many smiles, induced delighted expressions and little sounds

that were like ‘chortles.’ Rare shells you may find in the

gift shops are junonias shells and pointy horn snails.

If you are very adventurous, there are many air sports and

water sports to engage in. Boating and para-sailing come to

mind. Hang-gliding and speedboats may put a little zip into

your step, once you come down from the ‘high’ of exhilaration

you will experience.

I enjoy napping on the beach, but try to remember to slather

extra sunscreen with high SPF all over, even on your ears and

the tops of your feet! I had an ex who adored going back to

the motel or hotel, and taking a nap. Sometimes while he

was just waking up, he may have wished for some ‘afternoon

delight,’ too. I may not reveal if this was also, my idea

of romance, too!

Where else, other than traveling to the beaches on islands, do

you find your serenity and sense of tranquility?