Category Archives: “My Fair Lady”

Oh, So Lovely x Two!

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For some reason, possibly my love of musicals, the song,

“I Feel Pretty” comes to mind when I hear the words

“One Lovely Blog” Award!

(Do you remember the movie scene when Natalie Wood is

singing this in “West Side Story?”)

How about another musical reference?

“Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” while Eliza Doolittle is imagining a much better

life than being a flower cart girl. This is from another of my favorites,

“My Fair Lady.”

Last but not least, Cole Porter gave us a lovely combination of songs,

one which was made into a movie with Kevin Kline, the actor, playing

the musical composer and lyricist’s life story. “Delovely” makes me think

of how fun the world could be if we thought everything was ‘delightful’

and ‘delovely.’

One Lovely Blog Award nomination was given to me by Soul N Spirit blog,

by Rashmi, who is a sweetheart of a woman, sharing her travels, faith and

perspective on Life at:

http://soulnspirit.com

Kim also surprised me by nominating me for the One Lovely Blog Award.

These two women are beautiful inside and out. I am blessed by knowing

them and hope you will enjoy reading their posts.

You may find Kim’s Chronic Conditions and Life Lessons thoughts at:

http://kimgosselinblog.com

 

This post could include two quotes that mean a lot to me. I usually ‘wax

poetic’ when I get nominated for awards, never dreaming when I signed

up to create a “Free blog of thoughts on my wacky dating experiences”

then getting more serious, establishing my real reason for writing,

“Relationships Reveal Our Hearts.” Soon, I was finding humanity in all

aspects of the local scenery, the Midwestern states and finally, the world.

 

“Don’t cry because it is over,

Smile because it happened.”

(This means a lot to me, since I do try to smile despite the different ups and

downs in life. Author not given his/her due, when found this quote…)

 

“We could learn a lot from Crayons:

Some are sharp.

Some are pretty.

Some are dull.

Some have unique names.

(Interesting stories to tell.)

All are different shades and colors.

But they all exist very nicely in the same box.”

(I tinkered with this often passed around quote.)

 

The rules for awards to me, mean you should thank the one who gave you

the nomination. It doesn’t mean in a whole post, just in their comments’

section.

You should appreciate they have hundreds of choices out there, they decided

to choose to pass this one on to you.

 

This is to give you a ‘nod’ and a ‘pat on the back’ to let you know you are

appreciated and noticed.

 

1. Carol

http://writersdream9.wordpress.com

2. Mikial

http://mikialmillard.com

3. Catherine

http://artourway.com

4. Sherri

http://sherrimatthewsblog.com

5. Tokidoki with Jacqueline

http://jacquelinemhadel.wordpress.com

6. Michelle

http://michellemarieantellg.worpress.com

7. Humor:

http://fatbottomfiftiesgetfierce.com

8. find art and spiritual interests, like karma:

http://etherealpaints.wordpress.com

9. Nancy

http://nrhatch.wordpress.com

10. Find journalism and art here:

http://chaptertk.com

11. photos

http://russellrayphotos2.com

12. Ian

http://aussieemu.wordpress.com

13. Dianna

http://thesedaysofmine.com

14. Ashley

http://ashleyomelia.com

15. Emily

http://keysandopenmind.wordpress.com

 

Explore and enjoy these lovely blogs!

 

Fool’s Gold

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I was listening to the Beatles’ song, “The Fool on the Hill,” and then comparing it,

in my mind to, “A Fool in the Rain” sung by Led Zeppelin. All of a sudden, I realized

there can be a few ways that you can interpret the word, “Fool.” In the first song, it

means to be sad that you were made a ‘fool’ of, in love. The second song’s melody

is to a more upbeat tempo. Led Zeppelin’s song depicts being carefree enough to act

foolish. I like this idea of expressing your love through silly ways.

 

I like the idea of words and their interpretations. I have carried this out in a few of my

past different posts. (The Meaning of Regret, Patience, and others…) Definitions are

something I like to write and read about, especially  when I find out there are more

variations than I ever imagined. Also, the ‘roots’ of words interest me, too. I took a

course titled, “Etymology,” which I wish could have lasted much longer.

 

The definitions (and derivations) of fool:

(noun)- A person who acts unwisely or imprudently; a silly person.

A more archaic definition (noun)- A person who was formerly kept in

a noble or royal household, for casual entertainer; also, ‘jester.’

 

(verb)- Trick or deceive (someone); dupe.

A more casual definition (verb)- To spend time idly or aimlessly, as in

‘fooling away’ time.

Another casual interpretation (verb)- To spend money or trifles (‘to fool

away’ or ‘fritter,’) without advantage. This was also characterized as to

meddle thoughtlessly or tamper.

 

(adjective)- Informal usage: Foolish or silly.

 

What a ‘fool’ she is over that man!

 

When I quoted how dogs accept us when we act like ‘fools’ on Wednesday, 9/16/14,

by Samuel Butler. It mentioned dogs don’t mind joining us in this frivolity, I started

thinking about writing this post.

 

I like this use of the word, “foolish:”

The clown wore a ‘foolish’ little hat on top of his bushy red hair! (Bozo or Ronald

McDonald, come to mind.)

 

I don’t like this use of ‘fool:’

Don’t fool with that loaded gun!

 

Unfortunately, Scripture leaves us with negative connotations of “fool:”

“Wicked,” “depraved,” “senseless,” and “dullard” are given references in the Bible,

implying to be foolish is all of these horrible things.

 

What about that delicious dessert labeled, “fool?”  Isn’t it too delicious to be

considered a part of the word’s definition? I love the layering of angel food or

other flavored cakes, with fruit and whipped cream… Yummy! I have to give

this interpretation a ‘positive’ rating!

 

What about the way we celebrate April first, “Happy April Fool’s Day!” Isn’t

this a positive and fun-filled day? I think back of the tricks I played and had

played on me, they seem more friendly and evoke happy memories.

 

In this same light-hearted manner, my grandkids like to say, “I fooled you, Nana!”

This can come when they hide something, when they play a ‘magic trick’ on me

or when they tell a ‘fib’ and it is usually ‘outlandish!’ All are positives, through

my starry eyes of love.

 

When I was in my teens, some of us would say, “So and so is “fooling around”

with someone else.” It usually meant ‘sex,’ but sometimes it was also, meant

to include ‘being unfaithful’ to another person.

How do you ‘view’ this expression?

Can someone be ‘tinkering’ with their car and still say they are ‘fooling around?’

 

I used to feel that this was a positive compliment, when a friend would say,

“We can’t ‘fool’ you, Robin!”

 

Sometimes I think of myself being sort of pitiful, in terms of, “He sure did ‘fool’

me, though. Never could have seen that happen!”

 

Other times, I would say what kind of ‘fools’ we all are, when we believe a

politician or a famous actor’s lines.

 

Fool’s Paradise = delirious happiness.

Fool’s Gold = pyrite.

 

Often expressed words,

“A fool and his money are soon parted.”

 

“Fools rush in… where angels fear to tread.”

There are several references that come to mind, when I hear this quote.

The first one comes to mind, since I am a huge movie buff, along with liking

this movie plot is: “Fool’s Rush In.” This is a well done comedy, with several

serious underlying themes. First is, don’t do things while under the influence

of alcohol, or you may face consequences. The second is, you may find out

you like someone, once daylight hits, after all. Matthew Perry and Salma Hayek

are both interesting and amusing in this overall fun-loving movie.

The next thing that comes to mind,  is the song, “Fools Rush In (Where Angels

Fear to Tread,” written by Johnny Mercer, (1940). Yes, I wanted to find who were

the ones who sang this song, but my first memory of this song, was Ricky Nelson’s

version.

There have been dozens of famous people who have sung this popular song! The

first singer was Tony Martin. Then came The Glenn Miller Band,  with Ray Eberle

singing. Then came The Tommy Dorsey Band with Frank Sinatra singing this.

After that the remakes were about 20 years later, where it re-surfaced in 1960,

with someone named Brook Benton singing it. In 1962, (I would love this version!)

came Etta James. Also, in 1962, Doris Day sang a duet with Andre Previn of this

song.  Finally, the version that I know, with an upbeat tempo and a little ‘rock’

flair was sung by Ricky Nelson. (I still love his “Garden Party” song, don’t you?)

In 1971, Elvis Presley decided to include “Fools Rush In” in an album. There are

many more people, some I have never heard of, but needless to say, this is a very

popular song. I sure hope that the heirs of Johnny Mercer, collected some of the

royalties on this song!

 

I will sometimes remember how Eliza Doolittle says, “What a fool am I. . .” in the

song, “Without You.” (“My Fair Lady”)

 

A ‘shout out’ to my best use of matchmaking EVER: Happy 20th Wedding Anniversary,

Jenny and Dave! (My story about this is titled, “Love Found in a Video Store.” Yes,  I

found Dave, but had to call a few people to ‘identify’ him, while setting him up with my

good friend, Jenny.) Here’s to many more foolish times, fun and exciting adventures,

you two fun-loving people!

 

Hope you found more ‘gold’ here than ‘fool’s gold!’

 

I like to picture all my fellow bloggers  ‘fooling around,’ whistling, singing and enjoying

the sunny weather together! Let’s go on a hike with a picnic at the end of the trail. . .

 

 

When you think of the words, ‘fool’ and ‘foolish’ do you think of people who are young,

any age or elderly?

When you hear the word, ‘fool,’ does a song pop into your head?

Or if those questions don’t make you imagine something, can you remember a time you

felt ‘like a fool’ or ‘foolish?’ What age were you? If you wish to share a personal example,

feel free to give us one.

 

 

A Flower Cart Vendor and a Queen

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Today, May 20, 2014, we honor a character from a musical play and a

Queen of England! (Okay, maybe a day late for her!) Yesterday, May 19,

2014 was a federal statutory holiday called, “Victoria Day,” in Canada.

On my home calendar, they accidentally had it on the 20th! This extra

special day first came about for the celebration of Queen Victoria’s 35th

birthday.

That historic day had begun at midnight, with a ‘gun salute.’ I wonder

now if it was to wake everyone or maybe the party goers cavorted all

night and were already awake?

Annual celebrations included ‘pre-dawn serenades,’ athletic contests

or competitions, ‘torch-light processions,’ picnics and all-out 19th

Century revelry. This Canadian Patriotic Holiday makes it sound like

the United States’ Fourth of July celebrations!

There were two names listed, both French for Quebec’s celebration of

“Victoria Day:”

“Fete de Dollard” which lasted from the period of the “Quiet Revolution”

until 2003 and “Fete de la Reine,” (party for the Queen) which continues

to this day.

Also, there is another fascinating woman who really is ‘featured’ today:

“Eliza Doolittle Day!”

Both these notable women could be considered ‘heroines,’ of sorts.

One who was the creation in the imagination, originally, of George

Bernard Shaw in his play, “Pygmalion.” In 1938, a film adaptation of

the original stage play was produced.

When it was revised to become a musical, in 1956, Lerner and Lowe

had collaborated on the lyrics and plot line. It became a very well-

respected and beloved Broadway musical. It still circulates among

high schools, colleges and independent acting theaters.

When in 1964, Lerner and Loew’s musical was transferred into movie

form, it “shone” with the star, Audrey Hepburn. I think that I may

have written in a former post, awhile back, that Julie Andrews was

dismayed not to have been asked to be in either “My Fair Lady” or

“Camelot’s” film versions. Both had directors who chose ‘non-singing’

female leads in Vanessa Redgrave and Audrey Hepburn.

Just for your information, Marni Nixon was the young woman who voiced

all of Eliza’s songs, in the 1964 film adaptation, “My Fair Lady.”

I love how she delivers the song, “Just You Wait (Henry Higgins).”

Audrey Hepburn, as an innocent waif, did an excellent and well-received

portrayal of the character simply described as ‘the flower girl.’ Her

name was Eliza Doolittle.

So, this is the character for whom we celebrate today!

The male lead, playing the character of Professor Henry Higgins, is Rex

Harrison.

The part of Colonel Hugh Pickering, was played by Wilfrid Hyde-White.

Another fine actor and singer was Stanley Holloway portraying Eliza’s

father. He belts out the song, “I’m Getting Married in the Morning”

in his full blown version of a ‘cockney’ accent.

The songs are lovely memories for me, hopefully for some of you.

The whole concept of the transformation of Eliza, ‘the flower girl,’

into a fine lady of ‘high society’ in Edwardian London came from a bet

or a ‘wager’ between the two men, Professor Higgins and Colonel Pickering.

They happen to be ‘phoneticists’ or linguistics. They study phonics and

dialects.

Higgins is the one who thinks he can change Eliza by using phonetics

and recordings to eliminate her ‘cockney’ accent. She is able to complete

this transformation into a refined and formal lady by a set time, to

attend a Ball. She falters as a stilted, yet genteel, lady at the Ascot

Racecourse.

I remember, at age 9, going to see this “breath-taking” movie at the

theater with my family. It really enchanted me with the way the whole

story went, along with the costumes that were lovely. Not only for the

Ball, but the race track, too. My brothers and father did not complain,

it is funny, thinking back to that time. Sometimes, I think about the

many action movies we would go to where I would not say that I didn’t

really want to go. As a sign of the times, there were less choices

and one did what their parents ‘told them to do!’

Another amusing thought is that if “Eliza Doolittle” met the Queen

Victoria, what those two minds would have come up with! Especially

with one who was considered one of the longest reigning Monarch’s

of the British colonies and a simple ‘street urchin’ who had spunk

and a feisty nature indeed. I imagine there may have been some mutual

admiration for their strengths of character.

Now go on!

Celebrate with birthday cake and British tea or have a glass of wine to

cheer these women on!