Category Archives: politics

Cleveland and Ohio Ties

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Some notes and quotes of interest will be included in this collection

of Ohio and Cleveland ties. I enjoy trying to find newsworthy articles

that may enlighten others from different areas of the country or world.

Hope you find something which is ‘new’ and interesting here to read

and think about. The subject matters range from three famous people

who led purposeful lives, one which was cut short and covering the

diverse subjects of advertising, music, art and solar energy.

 

Please let me know which little tidbits you found here may have

meant something to you.

 

 

My Mom is the one who planted many seeds of literature, language,

art, nature and music in her children and students. My Dad was the

one who taught me lessons about science, space, philosophy, history

and religion. Curiosity was an area they both instilled in me.

 

At my Mom’s Senior Living Apartments for several months family

members and actual residents had their artwork on display. It was

interesting how many different abstracts, photographs, needlepoint

and other fabric-based art pieces were presented. There were still

life’s, which included one of the best detailed watercolor art I had

seen in a long time. This golden orange train was one that caught

my eye, almost every trip down to the dining room during the

months from October until December, 2014.

 

The picture of the train, another of an outdoors scenery, along with

the preciseness of his watercolors drew me in. I had to know more

about John N. (Jack or “Franz”) Keeler.  He resided in Westlake,

Ohio up until his death in 2012.  His wife, Betty, is still a current

resident at the senior living apartments where my mother lives.

 

It is a fascinating history of a man who served his country during

WWII’s European front years,  as a member of the U.S. Army Air

Corps. He came home to pursue art and advertising, his own choice

of opening one of the first in America’s merchandising (advertising)

agencies. The name he gave his agency was, “Point of Power,” and

his client list was famous. His clients included Alcoa, Carling Black

Label beer and Chevrolet. His unique, detailed artwork is beautiful.

 

It would have been nice to have met the man, Jack or ‘Franz” Keeler.

Since he lived a long and purposeful life of  92 years. I would have

liked to know more about him. What helped him to choose using his

art through advertising.

 

 

One of Otis Redding’s last public appearances was on a popular radio

station in Cleveland, Ohio. Can you believe Otis would have only been

74 years old had he lived beyond his shortened life of 26 years?

 

The Cleveland radio station was playing a December tribute to this

musical legend who died in a plane crash in 1967. When I heard the

list of songs Otis Redding had already produced in just 26 years of

living, I tried to picture what a huge impact and the ‘body’ of songs

we may have been able to hear from Otis had he lived a longer life.

Here is Otis Redding’s list of popular songs:

“These Arms of Mine”

“Try a Little Tenderness”

“Satisfaction”

“(Sittin’) On the Dock of the Bay”

 

The words the radio announcer sent out to us, December, 2014

gave me a chill and left a haunting impression. He described Otis

Redding as a personable and likeable guest back visiting their

radio studio, in 1967. These words spoke volumes when the radio

announcer added,

“Otis (left us and ) got in that great bird to Heaven.”

 

Conan O’Brien talks about many national sports teams, including

the Cleveland Browns football team and basketball team, Cleveland

Cavaliers. Even though he is from Massachusetts, he often mentions

Ohio. I was putting on some “Burt’s Bees lip balm, when I overheard

him being quoted as saying about “Burt’s Bees,”  in an interview.

Conan included some fun quips:

“Mind your own bees’ wax.”

“Just showing her the birds and the bees.”

 

Roxanne Quimby and Burt Shavitz created from their candle

business, along with combining leftover bees wax,  the company,

“Burt’s Bees,” which came out of Maine in the 1980’s and was

later purchased for a huge amount of money in 2007, by Clorox.

 

As far as I know from another article I looked up about Conan,

he is legally able to officiate at weddings and did participate in

marrying a gay couple in his home state in 2011. He is such an

interesting and intelligent talk show host, also one who displays

a keen sense of humor and compassion.

 

This is not directly from Ohio, but is being shared by this Ohio

native, from me to you.

Another word being used instead of “circular” lately is,

“Curvilinear.”

 

Another set of facts not coming directly from Ohio is how

awareness of solar energy is found available while driving up

and down rural country roads of Ohio. Solar Energy is also a

part of our local political debate. You can see the large white

(to me, innocuous) solar windmills more and more across the

countryside. For some reason, they are often ‘boycotted’ and

are being considered a ‘nuisance’ in the eyes of some beholders.

 

I like this famous quote from the inventor of electricity and

Milan, Ohio native:

“I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy.

What a source of power!

I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal

run out before we tackle that.”

~Thomas Alva Edison, 1931.

Humor Comes in All Sorts of Packages

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Sometimes there are things you may “think,” but you would never

put into words. You may even admire the one who seems to have

listened to that impudent ‘voice in your head.’ You may, on the other

hand, cringe and think, “Oh no! That is way too blunt!”

 

Comedy is often built around those ‘cringe-worthy’ moments.  I

laugh at movies, which if someone were to actually DO the things

which are depicted in the movies, I may actually display a face

full of horror.  I may be outwardly ‘aghast’ but I also might be

laughing on the inside, too.

 

In Shakespeare’s time, his plays often added humor sometimes

displaying a bit of ‘sauciness.’ While taking a high school English

‘mini-course,’ we studied Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales.” The school

administration encouraged our teacher, Mr. Billman, to send home

parents’ permission slips before we read and discussed this rather

controversial book. It makes me smile a little to think we needed

permission to read this bawdy collection of tales. They are considered

‘classics.’ This book has been on some lists for ‘book-burning,’ too.

 

When the history of ‘drag queens’ is studied, you learn that the

ones who were “dressed as girls” became called, “drags.” While

those who were wearing men’s (otherwise known as ‘boys’)

clothing were named, “drabs.”

 

Women dressed as men, sometimes in the most interesting

situations. In the movie, “The Year of Living Dangerously,”

Kevin Costner’s character has a ‘male’ friend, a photographer.

Linda Hunt won Best Supporting Actress in her male role.

 

In the movie, “Yentl” Barbara Streisand portrayed a young man

in this Jewish story. It was unusual in that it was considered to be

a “romantic musical drama comedy” movie released in 1983.

 

In the more recent 2012 movie, Glenn Close depicted the main

character and title role in, “Albert Nobbs.” She was nominated for

Best Actress in this movie, along with Golden Globe and SAG’s

but did not win in her fascinating portrayal of a man.

 

Women were not often ‘allowed’  in stage productions, due to the

impropriety.  So, the original ‘drag’ performers were considered

‘normal,’ while performing in traditional plays. Their wardrobe

choice would fit the role they were playing. This made men wearing

women’s clothes, considered ‘appropriately attired.’

 

In the making of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s life, in the movie,

“Amadeus,” there are several scenes where the fine, classical and

renowned musician is carrying on with people of questionable

sexual orientation.

 

Funny. how when the black and white movie, with Tony Curtis,

Jack Lemmon and the gorgeous, Marilyn Monroe cane out in 1959,

no one made a big deal about men hiding in women’s clothing,

from the Mob. The same theme came into play, in the television

series, “Bosom Buddies.” This resulted in giving us the famous,

funny and talented actor, Tom Hanks.

 

There are many other examples of men dressing up like women

which makes the audience laugh.

 

Why does it bother some people then, to go and see a Drag Queen

or a comedy performance with men dressed as women? I guess

this is up to each person’s level of Comfort Zone.

 

There may be some of Mary Nolan’s humorous comments listed

in this post which you may not like. You may even consider them

‘distasteful.’ I hope you will laugh instead. But, at least I gave you

‘fair warning’ of the content in the remainder of this post.

 

I edited out a few of this transgender Columbus native’s raunchy

descriptions of famous people and left the more ‘palatable’ ones

here.

 

There is something to be said about bluntness and edginess. I am

one who doesn’t believe in censorship. What I hear in a comedy

sketch or stand up routine performed in a local tavern, bar, film or

comedy club is usually off-color but comical, one way or another.

 

I have to admit, I may like ‘shocking’  or ‘bawdy’ content. Now, be

honest: Have you ever laughed at “Bridesmaids,” “American Pie”

or “There’s Something about Mary?”

 

This is not “R-rated”nor even “PG 13,” so hope you find something

to laugh out loud about. But if not, this is fine. Humor is like food

and other ‘tastes:’ To each his own!

 

Each of these comments were published in the January, 2015,

“Outlook” magazine.  These are taken from Mary Nolan’s column,

“Reading is Fundamental.” The main readership of this monthly

publication  comes from  the culture of Ohio’s  LGBT  and  Ally

community. You can find this in the lobby of our Delaware County

District Library and other central Ohio locations. It is free to all.

 

1. About John Boehner-

 

“Hey John, skin cancer called and it doesn’t want you either!”

 

2. About Taylor Swift- (appearing with the Victoria Secret models

in her own white outfit, circlet of white feathers on her head and

angel wings):

 

“It’s like the cast of “Glee” gang-banged a bag of sugar-coated

rainbows and the offspring was the most nauseating collection

of happy teen angst.”

 

3. About Kim Kardashian-

 

“I’m all for big (“a- – – -“) behinds, but this girl makes Ohio

bottoms look slightly less hungry.”

 

4. About Nick Jonas- (appearing in a photo without a shirt on):

“Nope, not gonna try to read this one except to say that he was

talentless in the group, Hanson.”

 

5. About Johnny Manziel-

“Nice work in that first start. Helen Keller did a better job of

finding the mark.”

 

6. About Mike DeWine- (on the subject of legalizing same sex

marriage):

“Fiscal responsibility apparently stops when it comes to a couple

of queens getting hitched.”

 

7. About Sherri Dribblelipz-

“I’m all for French broads and their hairy bodies, but for Christ’s

sake, would it kill you to take a weed whacker to them pasty white

airplane pillows? It’s like this: whatever happened to Baby Jane?

I don’t care!”

 

8. About Rosie O’Donnell-

“She’ll huff, she’ll puff and she’ll blow all of your interest in her

out the window.”

 

9. About Suze Ormon- (financial advisor)

“I’d rather get stock advice from the guy who sells drugs in a gay

bar bathroom stall.”

 

10. About Jesse Tyler Ferguson-

(From “Modern Family,” where he is the thinner man in the gay

couple and has red hair):

“For the love of everything unholy, flesh colored beards have never

been and never will be attractive!”

 

11. About Bianca Del Rio-

“Bianca calls her bit the “Rolodex of Hate.” It’s more like the

“Rolodex of Repeat.” She’s had the same material for her entire

40-year career! Speaking of which, Bianca, what were the 70’s

like?”

 

I used to listen to RuPaul, a famous Drag Queen, actress and

author. She made the rounds on talk shows and often appeared

in comedy skits. You can see him in such family movies as,

“The Brady Bunch Movie” and “Brady Bunch Sequel.”

His two books were published and had good sales.

RuPaul’s two books are called,

“Letting It All Hang Out” (an autobiography)

and “Workin’ It.”

 

Here are three RuPaul quotes for you to read:

 

~”When you become the image of your imagination,

it’s the most powerful thing you could ever do.”

 

~”If you don’t love yourself, how the H- – – you gonna

love someone else?”

 

~”We all come into this world naked.  The rest is all drag.”

 

Viva le difference!

 

Artistic Genius

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My young friend, Margaret, at a fun blog recommended I see this

movie, “Camille Claudel” which is a French movie about Rodin and

one of his many female apprentices, who became enraptured with

him, became an artist by her ‘own right,’ and ultimately finished her

life in a mental

institution for 30 years. This was another example of how being a

woman during a different time period created challenges for her

own ability to present her artwork, mainly sculptures, to the world.

 

Poor dear Camille Claudel.

While getting this movie, you may have to go through a rather

complicated ‘search,’ since mine took me on a nearly ‘wild goose

chase.’

 

This was not available in the state of Ohio, in DVD form?

How is this possible?

 

Anyway, Central Campus of Southern State Community College

sent Delaware County District Library the movie, “Camille Claudel”

in VHS form. Thank goodness, I have one of those tiny televisions

with a VHS ‘drawer’ installed in it. It is one that has accompanied

more than one of my own three children off to college in the late

90’s and early 2000’s.

 

The director is Bruno Nuytten and has the sense of darkness in

his scenes and perspective thrown into his filming close shots.

The main actor, portraying Rodin, is Gerard Depardieu who was

in the American movie, “Green Card” and is well know for his

Academy Award nominated role in, “Jean de Florette.” The

female character is played beautifully by Isabelle Adjani. She

may be recognized for several roles but more famous, at least to

me while playing in, “Ishtar.” She was nominated for her portrayal

of  a character she played in, “Story of Adelett.”

 

This fine French film, “Camille Claudel, fascinated me. It was truly a

disturbing masterpiece. It  was nominated for “Best Foreign Language

Film” in 1989. (Gerard Depardieu was thin and muscular in this film.)

The story begins with a young, lithe woman in an alley in Paris, where

she is digging into a cliff of what looks like mud.  This must have some

amount of ‘clay’ in it.  She is gathering clumps of this, being muddy

from head to foot, and flinging it into her large container; like a bucket.

 

The brutal cold scene depicts snow on the ground.

It is February, 1885.

 

Camille’s story is full of  harrowing and intensely dramatic moments.

I hope you may look up her fantastic sculptures.  One which has the

name of “The Chatterboxes.” In the film, the piece looks like it is

carved from black coal, in its raw material state.

The beautiful sculptures may be viewed at the Musee D’Orsay in

Paris, France. Or much closer, you may look Camille Claudel on

the Internet.

 

Another, called, “Age of Maturity,” a neighbor child named Robert

asks such a sweet and insightful question of Camille of a gorgeous

sculpture:

“How did you know there were people inside the big rock?”

As if she had chiseled them Micah said,

“Out of their hiding place, like in a cave.”

 

My grandson, age 5 1/2 mentioned when I had him come across the

room where I sat at the dining table watching this film.

Micah was over by the living room section of my apartment watching

Saturday morning “Sponge Bob Square Pants” episodes and eating

pancakes he had helped make.

 

Later, he took a “cartoon break” to wash the dishes, taking his shirt off

and standing on my step stool. He rushed out to see a particularly

dramatic scene where the noise caught his attention.

 

Sadly, Camille Claudel was used and debased in every way.

She became a model, muse and an original artist and sculptor,

under the tutelage of Rodin.

 

She lost touch with her father, mother, brother and reality by

becoming immersed and having a long-lasting affair with Rodin.

Rodin’s wife who lives apart from Rodin, while he is ensconced

in his huge studio, calls Camille loudly on the streets, “Whore”

and many obscenities.

 

I felt it was most depressing that her husband is still given his

wife’s adoring attention, not disparaging HIM with the same

kind of swearing in other scenes. She persuades him after many

years of his intimate relationship with Camille, to move away.

When Camille is eventually thrown out of Rodin’s studio, having

served her time with him for almost 28 years, I cried. It is such

a tragedy, but you cannot help wanting to see more. . .

 

Camille writes long letters to the Court and Magistrate, asking

and pleading for her own sculptures and art pieces, ones she

designed to be given back. She independently had created lovely

marble sculptures with fine detailed hands, arched backs and

her brother finds her living in the upstairs of an abandoned

building, wishing to use his fame as a poet, along with his good

friend, “Blot,” who wishes to be her ‘benefactor.’ He is meaning

by helping financially and wonderfully is not asking her to give

her still beautiful body to him.

 

There is a point when the Court says she was ‘paid’ for her donations

of her artwork. (They were stolen and kept by Rodin.)

Camille defiantly declares,

“I burned the check!”

 

Her anger at her inability to get her own art back leads her to yell

about “Rodin’s gang.” She feels that France calling her sculptures,

“Property of the State,” are wrong but cannot find anyone at any

level to listen to her pleas. Her friend and lawyer, “Dr. Michaux,”

tried his best to defend her. The cops who haul her each time out

of the courtroom seem to show a more sympathetic view, as they

take her away.

 

When her father is dying, Camille goes to see him, she listens but

cries as he says she ‘disappointed him,’ but he ‘still loves her.’

There is something hurtful and touching in her studying the

Her brother, after the one singularly amazing gallery opening,

describes her pieces as lighting the inner beauty and qualities

of people through her sculptures. They have such delicate and

sensitive details, but she later while they are transported back

to where she is ‘squatting,’ is told not one piece was sold. Her

appearance in finery at the opening, with rouge and red lips

made her appear scandalous, unfortunately.

 

Camille destroyed many of her pieces, her madness in these

scenes of devastation is understandable. I would have gone

mad, under the circumstances.

The authorities never jail her in prison.

 

It was her own brother who ultimately, ‘betrayed her,’ and using

the ‘excuse’ of preventing her from hurting herself, placed her in

the mental institution.

 

Camille Claudel was put into a mental institution in March, 1913.

She lived, ‘imprisoned’ there, until 1943.

 

Camille never did any more artwork after she was placed there.

This was her own way of rebelling and refusing to ‘buckle under

authority.’

 

Thank so much for recommending this, Margaret! Your comment,

after reading my post about Mozart’s sister, Maria Anna Mozart

led me to watch this. You were so right in your choice of this movie,

another example where because of her gender, along with her

choice to become involved with a famous sculptor and artist,

she lost herself.

You may find Margaret who has a clever and funny video of

herself recently on a post at:

http://verybangled.com

 

 

The best question I feel needs to be asked,

“Where does creative passion separate from insanity?”

 

 

Onward later tonight, I will be watching, “Amadeus,” which I had

seen so many years before. . .

My grandson, Micah, is with me, while playing Teenage Mutant

Ninja Turtle ‘free games,’  I will try to check a few posts out.

Bidding Adieux to the Old Year

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As we bid ‘adieux’ to the Old Year, 2014, we may reflect on this past

year and see some great things happened in the world, along with

our personal lives. This post won’t dwell on the many negative news

items that took place across the world. My recent conversation I had

with my good friend, Patrice, where we discussed the economy was

full of hope. She is a moderate Republican but found Pres. Obama

has “helped the economy,” citing some personal ways it improved.

Especially for the businesses of her family, who saw an upswing in

purchasing pizzas at her brother in law’s pizza chain, along with her

sister’s Castle Farms in Charlevoix, Michigan having much continued

success. Pat shared good news with her family’s investments in stocks

and bonds, showing profitable and significant increases. The U.S. stock

exchange and business world has not been this secure since Clinton’s

administration. (This can be confirmed in the business pages of the

New York Times, Cleveland Plain Dealer and Columbus Dispatch.)

 

I don’t really wish to quote statistics, just the positive slow, gradual

upswing in the economy as something good to report.

 

While talking with members of our warehouse, several mentioned

the Obamacare (health care and insurance) situation seems to have

‘finally straightened out.’

 

While talking with my artistic brother, Randy, we were on the ‘same

page’ thinking that the renewal of ties with Cuba is a positive way to

bring trade. Also, influencing the political climate of country south of

us, which we have had past problems with. Hoping this will lead to a

better future connection. While this may be ‘common knowledge’ I

found the fact the leader of Cuba is one who has chosen to lead a ‘gay

lifestyle’ hopeful,  since this may mean that there will be less civil unrest

and hateful reactions to people of different life choices.

 

It also seems to reflect a ‘gentler’ means of controlling his country, less

than we had from Fidel Castro. Back in 1963, Fidel Castro had made

quite a mean statement about Cuba’s gay community and their ‘tight

pants’ and wishing to display ‘girlie’ acts in public. Since 2012, there

have been annual Cuban “Kiss-In’s” which is the gay community’s way

of standing up to the controlling leadership in a non-violent way. Even

getting a positive ‘nod’ from the Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro,

for the United States reaching out to Cuba with an olive branch.

This was all compiled by myself: having attempted to confirm various

sources of information.

 

I will hope Fidel’s brother, President Raul Castro, will help lead his

country from communism into socialism. They may label themselves

‘socialistic,’ but the cruel army regime exists there still. I can ‘dream’

of Cuba’s someday becoming a Democratic country, where people’s

votes will be counted.

 

It is totally fine with me, if this positive outlook is challenged with

big doses of reality. I am “open for debate” in my comments section!

 

Thomas Kinkade, 2001:

“I believe that adding light to the canvas of our daily existence is a

simpler process than we often make it out to be. I believe it really is

possible to think and act in ways that shine more radiant joy in our

lives and the lives of those around us.”

 

From my old Children’s Anthology, which featured ‘brownies’ who are

like little sprites in the night:

“In January, when the snow

Lies on the hills and valleys low

And from the north the chilly breeze

Comes whistling through the naked trees

Upon toboggans long they ride,

Until the broadening light of day

Compels them all to quiet their play.”

(Written and Illustrated by Palmer Cox.)

 

My post-Christmas special memories of this year, 2014:

*~ I loved having my Mom be happy and healthy in body

and spirit. She was entranced by the Elf doll which was

a bright and cute girl, with red ‘velvet’ skirt with white

trim, with green and white striped hose and red pointy

shoes, with bells on each toe. She exclaimed each time

she spied it up on the edge of a rocking chair back.

*~ I found the most giving souls were the two six year old

Kindergarteners, among my grandies.

Little Marley could not open her gift before I opened her

purchase of a white painted sleigh bell with its top hat and

cheery face, making it a cute little snowman ornament.

Marley slipped a bracelet into my coat pocket, which she

had made from a craft kit given to her by Santa. I did not

‘discover’ this string of red, black, pink and yellow stars until

I got home, putting my mittens back into my pockets.

 

Micah had used his Secret Santa school “pocket savings”

from his home piggy bank to purchase a wide variety of

little dollar gifts. Mine was a head band which had a pair

of reindeers on the ‘antennae.’ This was the first time I had

seen this head adornment; usually the two ‘antennae’ are

antlers! I wore it proudly around to both families’ Christmas

events. I also had two children request a photo taken with

them on. Quite a thoughtful and fun gift, Micah!

 

The ‘true spirit’ of giving was in both these little ones’ hearts.

 

Do you have any thoughts about the political climate or post-

holiday memories you wish to share?

 

We Need Mary Travers’ Message

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It has been five years since Mary Travers passed away. There was a

replay of her famous people-populated memorial service on PBS

over last weekend. I was weeping and laughing throughout this special

moment in time. The memories of the group “Peter, Paul and Mary”

will always be there, ingrained into my emotional well being.

 

Mary was 72 years old,  living from November 9, 1936 until she passed

away on September 16, 2009. She was born in Kentucky and at age two,

moved to New York with her family. This is where she eventually got

connected with music. Mary died in Connecticut, after fiercely battling

leukemia. She had endured bone marrow transplants, in the hopes of

living longer. I have to add, ‘fighting until the end,’ since Mary was not

one to be afraid or back down on Life or any important issues.

 

The families of the three close and dear friends still gather to this day.

They play music and continue peaceful activities giving tribute to her

memory. There were montages (photographs and film) shown through-

out the special program. Picnics with families sitting on their blankets,

children running around while Peter and Paul’s, along with Mary’s,

families all gather and rejoice in their loving connections.

 

At the Memorial Service shown on PBS, I was impressed with the ones

who came to give their respects. I hope it may be of interest to you, to

remember the members of the musical group along with hearing what

the prominent guests shared about Mary Travers. Each time I tried to

listen to the words being said, but paraphrased and encapsulated them.

 

“The Guests”

George McGovern gave a serious pronouncement declaring that Mary

‘would not stand for bigotry or racism,’  and said her life was devoted to

opening people’s hearts and allowing love to come inside.

John Kerry said in a kindly, folksy tone, ‘All the ones who support

people’s rights are here and present. Carrying on the message will be

her legacy.’

Bill Moyers was emotional and said for everyone to keep singing and

believing, passing the Peace around.

Whoopie Goldberg talked about Mary’s impact on people’s lives by

saying Mary had an incredible way of ‘touching people’s lives and

changing them for the better.’

There was a song video tribute replaying a concert that Pete Seeger

sang with Peter, Paul and Mary.

The way that the two men spoke of Mary got me crying, something

about Mary “lives in their cells.” Something about Mary is part of the

“fabric of our country.” She lives on in so many different ways. Not

sure if this was Paul, but my notes say,

“Love ties us together. The vibration of Peter, Paul and Mary, I believe,

made the world a better place to live.”

 

Gloria Steinem spoke about how Mary believed everyone should be

treated the same wherever they came from and whoever they were.

She mentioned, Mary Travers stood up for  “Peace, Justice and

Equality,” supporting all people. This also included the Women’s

Rights Movement and the Civil Right’s Movement. I had forgotten

that they were there at the March on Washington and were in the

Selma and other southern cities singing about peaceful protesting.

 

“Messages”

The meaningful and moving song called,  “We Shall Not Be Moved,”

(written and has been performed by Mavis Staples) was played at

Mary’s Memorial Service. The audience and choir sang along with

this one.

 

A beautiful poem with inspiring words (that were metaphors for

branches of humanity) started with its words about there being

one world, many forests. Then many forests, many trees. As it

went, many trees, many branches, many branches, one branch,

and many leaves.” (The person who explained this as multiple

faiths, one God, made it very spiritual. They mentioned that

God is for everyone. . .) I have to admit, I cannot seem to track

this one down. Sorry, but it was lovely, wished to share its

message and it made me wonder who wrote it, too.

 

The funny parts of the tribute to Mary Travers were about how

her blonde hair and good looks brought more mail and men to

the concerts. Also, there were references about her being sexy

and rocking back and forth, moving with lots of energy during

their concerts. Peter and Paul took turns sometimes interjecting

the funny, comic relief moments.

 

Many people repeated throughout the PBS special, the music of

Peter, Paul and Mary was more than just for one period of time,

it is ‘for all times.’ It was not written with definitive beginnings and

endings, it was meant to be “Music for Change.”

 

“The Music”

Of course, the wisdom and message about Peace is found within

the words of, “Blowin’ in the Wind.” (Which was written and sung

by Bob Dylan,  permission given to be sung by P, P and Mary over

the years.)

The words about loving your country and being part of the world,

“This Land Is Your Land,” is another recognizable song. This fine

song was written by Woody Guthrie, before WWII, in 1940. The

long lasting message resonates with me, doesn’t it with you?

I like all versions of it, but am most familiar with the way Peter,

Paul and Mary sang this anthem. It makes me proud to be an

American.

 

John Denver’s “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” continues to be affiliated

with the group, Peter, Paul and Mary, too. (John has been gone

for seven years, having accidentally crashed his ultra light plane

in 1997.)

There are possibly millions of weddings where they included the

loving words of the song, “Wedding Song/There is Love.”

So many children loved the words to, “Puff the Magic Dragon”

that when they grew up to be parents they taught their own kids

to love the words, too.

Two love songs I ‘slow danced to’ were, “Like the First Time” and

“Such is Love.” Another one which my parents liked, “Kisses Are

Sweeter than Wine.”

A new Rally Call is being made to this new or next generation and

there is a program called, “Operation Respect.” This is being done in

Mary’s name. 22 different countries, including Israel, have people

who have joined together and are following this project.

 

Do you have a favorite Peter, Paul and Mary memory or song?

 

The two remaining members, Peter and Paul, continue to spread

or sow seeds of love and understanding around the world. After

all, we still need the message.

 

 

Slippery Situations

Standard

While walking around the warehouse, I noticed several orange cones.  Navigating

in all areas of our life we need to use care and caution. Slippery areas are bound to

turn up. What we do during these stressful times and how we handle them can be

a true example of what kind of character traits we embody. Our values are put to the

test throughout our lives.

The New Brittanica – Webster Dictionary (1981 version) gives us this definition of

the word,

“slippery (adjective)-

1. Having a surface smooth enough to slide or lose one’s hold, (a slipppery floor.)

2.  Not worthy of trust, (tricky, unreliable.)”

 

Roads, bridges and underpasses are “slippery when wet.” When the weather changes,

ice freezes the sidewalks and other things that can be dangerous, like cement steps

or metal fire escapes. Fog or rain’s moisture creates slippery conditions, too. Anyone

who has slid on an icy road in a car or “hydro-planed” through a large puddle has

possibly seen their life pass or flash before their eyes.

 

Here are a few different ways that ‘slippery’ can be viewed in a more humorous light:

1. How many times have you lost a plate or a glass due to soapy water? (It may not be

a funny memory, if it was a valuable dish or antique wine goblet that slipped out of

your grasp. This is a matter of your perspective and how you handle being a ‘klutz.’

It is usually my habit to tend to laugh.)

2. Is there anything more slippery than a wet baby?  Of course, another subject all

together, is a greased pig contest.

3. When you are attempting to wash a wriggly kitten or a squirming puppy you may

think they are the most slippery creatures alive.

4. Often home deliveries or cartoons about doctors delivering babies depict ones that

arrive so fast they need a catcher’s mitt!

5. Paired with the romantic images of silken skin, the subject can become sensuous.

Slinky, glazed slippery bodies glide together. Sometimes the scenes where films turn

this into  ‘spoofs’ can be hilarious.

6. When my son was young, he chose reading books about Reptiles and Amphibians.

I remember learning about the texture and feel of their skin. Salamanders are slimy.

Snakes and chameleons slither but don’t slide. I was so glad when Jamie developed an

interest in mice and a friendship with a rat.

7. I like the following slippery animals/mammals: seals, dolphins and whales.

 

I think people who are ‘sneaking around’ on their partners are slippery characters.

They just seem to be bending the rules, they cannot be relied upon or counted on.

I also feel that shifty, minor level thieves could fall into this category. I think pick-

pockets have to be particularly ‘slippery’ to get a wallet out of a man’s suit jacket.

 

I also can imagine a beautiful picture in my mind of ‘slippery’ described like this:

The graceful ice skaters were gliding across the smooth ice. They were grateful

for ice which was slippery like glass. So much better than frozen ponds they

remembered in their youths, with bumps and uneven ice which created flaws

and falls in their programs.

 

Brainstorming about the idea of ‘slippery’ subjects, I thought about going down a

“slippery slope.” Which sometimes can mean you may soon be shifting your values

or your position on a subject.  It can begin by allowing yourself to go just one small

step past what you consider ‘acceptable behavior’ and then, you may bend the rules

even more the next time.

Society may have gone down its own ‘slippery slope.’  People may have memories

of movies that used to be rated, “M” which meant they were “Recommended for

Mature Audiences Only.” It used to be much more prevalent to find movies which

were rated “G.” Now, most movies fall in the “PG-13” and rated “R” categories.

 

In 2006, a movie called, “Slippery Slope,” was made about a female filmmaker, who

directs a porn film while working on her thesis. (Fictional)

 

In the areas of  government, legal and politics, compromising can be considered

‘normal.’  The idea becomes like a domino effect where ‘one bad decision leads to

another.’ An example of this could be made that the senator got the bill passed by

talking to lobbyists, along with bargaining with senators on both sides of the issue.

Another example of going down that ”slippery slope” in business, employees may be

encouraged to ‘fudge’ on their records, documents and paper work.  This is risky

business, since it could be found through company audits or worse still, the IRS

could discover the less than honest paper trail.  The IRS and government watch-

dog groups can pursue legal ramifications or bring criminal actions against those

who have gone too far. Agencies should not practice following this fallacy:  “The

end justifies the means.”

 

Since many of us love trees, I would be remiss not to mention the slippery elm tree

which has a fragrant inner bark and is a North American hardwood. I don’t have my

Dad around to ask him  what kind of ‘elm blight’ disease our trees had. We had to cut

down several elms while I was in high school, but probably were not slippery elms. I

do remember being sad in the summer since they had provided us much shade, but

(sorry for this) in the fall, it meant less leaves to rake.

 

There once was a movie with the town of Slippery Rock. I thought it was a Western?

There is a town in Pennsylvania called Slippery Rock.

 

In the movie, “Hot Fuzz” there is music from 60’s and 70’s British Rock music which

incluides a song called, “Slippery Rock 70’s” written by Nigel Fletcher. This music is

police-themed, light hearted in tone music. (Goofy, funny movie.)

 

Everyone who is familiar with his music and has heard the song, “Slip Sliding Away,”

may be surprised its 10 years since it came out. This frolicy song written and sung by

Paul Simon on his album, “Still Crazy After all These Years.” (2004)

 

 

Languages, with their roots of words, are so fascinating to me. I enjoy the study of

words, their meanings and history sometimes going as far back as Latin or Greek. It

is interesting to learn how they have evolved or changed in usage. Language and the

ways cultures interpret words captures my mind, too.

I hope this post about the etymology of the word, “slippery,” was a fun read for you.

It may show up in your next short story, article or you may add a shady character

who is rather ‘slippery’ when it comes to being captured by the police authorities.

 

If you speak or know a different language, let me know how ‘slippery’ is written/

translated. Does the meaning of ‘slippery’ stay the same? Or does it change slightly

in its meaning?

To start the ball rolling, “resbaladiza” is the Spanish word for slippery.

Just wondering, since I would not wish it to be lost in translation.

 

 

Rare Books

Image

The unique, exquisite first edition rare books collection is awe-inspiring.

This includes many books you will know and love. It includes international

books, on loan for a brief period, from September 29 until November 9, 2014.

A man named Stuart Rose, started collecting books that were special to him.

Rose’s collection began when he found in 1992, the First Edition of,

“Tarzan,”

by

Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Rose went on collecting past 2000 First Edition or

“One of a Kind” books.

There are 49 featured books,

displayed on

University of Dayton

campus,

in the

Roesch Library

First Floor

Gallery.

 

I love the title of the exhibition:

 

“Imprints

and

Impressions”

 

Part

of

the

“Milestones

in

Human Progress”

Program:

 

Highlights

from the

Rose Rare Book

Collection

 

There are directions online

you may follow to get to

the place you need to go.

 

Jane Austen’s

“Pride

and

Prejudice,”

Quote:

“The spoken word passes away, while the written word remains.”

 

Paul H. Benson,

essayist for the

Dayton UD Alum

Magazine

reminded

us of the

Essence

and

Importance

of:

Preserving books while time marches forward

some day society may feel we don’t ‘need’ them.

These are our own printed legacy and heritage.

(Not quoted, but read and digested. Explaining

and passing on my feeling of urgency to see this

magnificent book collection before it goes away.)

 

Here are some favorites of mine:

The

“Qu’ran”

Copied

in

Beautifully

Intricate

Calligraphy

by

Aziz

Khan

Kashmiri

(1864)

 

Galileo,

“Starry Messenger”

(1610)

 

Mark Twain,

“Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

(1885)

 

Isaac Newton,

(Misspelled words,

intentionally copied as

Newton

chose to do.)

“Opticks

or a Treatise

of the

Reflexions, Refractions

Inflexions and Colours

of

Light.

Also,

Two Treatises

of the

Species and Magnitude

of

Curvilinear Figures”

(1704)

 

Ralph Ellison,

“Invisible Man”

(1952)

 

Virginia Woolf,

“A Room of One’s Own”

(1929)

 

J. R. R. Tolkien,

“The Lord of the Rings”

Hand-written

Proofs,

with final edits

done in pen.

(1953 – 1955)

 

Geoffrey Chaucer,

“Canterbury Tales”

(1492)

 

Rene Descartes,

“Discourse on the Method”

(1637)

 

William Shakespeare,

“Comedies, Histories and Tragedies”

(1632)

 

Nicholas Copernicus,

“On the Revolution of Celestial Spheres”

(1543)

 

*I would love to see*

Artistic

Illustrations

drawn by

Salvador Dali,

“Alice in Wonderland”

(1969)

 

There are more books to examine and admire.

 

There is a special informative talk by former

UD graduate and famous person,

Daniel De Simone,

about the Rose exhibit on:

October 16, 2014,

7:00 – 8:30 p.m

 

Daniel De Simone is

Librarian at the

Folger Shakespeare Library,

Washington, D. C.

(Formerly worked at

Library of Congress)

Lecture topic:

“Why the Stuart Rose Book Collection

Matters in the Age of Digital Surrogates.”

 

Since I have two First Edition books that are not ‘rare’ nor very great condition,

I felt the power of words would be expressed better personally, if I told you about

my books.

“Magnificent Obsession,”

Lloyd C. Douglas

(1929)

P.F. Collier and Sons, Company

New York, New York.

The book begins with a physician given as, “Doctor Hudson.” His mental and physical

condition is described as “on the verge of a collapse,” along with “all but dead on his feet.”

We can all relate, in one way or another, to this man who is trying to be the best doctor

he can. Reminding us of that often expressed, “Physician heal thyself.”

Then comes a “twist of fate.”

I love this book, which was made into a movie. (Although, it changes some of the details,

making it a different story entirely.)

In the end of the book, another doctor is mentioned, if you were not aware of the accident

you might wonder who this character is. “Doctor Hudson” is no longer the focus. The reader

has come to know and love a different man, you see.

This story has turned from a solitary life of medicine to one where there is someone named,

“Bobby.”

He plans on boarding a train, then disembarking to go on a big steamer ship.

The love of his life, (you need to read the book to find out how he met her!)

“Mauve” approaches with what the author describes as, “a snug, saucy, cloche hat” on

her head and she is wearing, “a tailored suit of mauve that sculptures every curve of

her body.” She embraces him and the rest of the happy ending comes in his plans for

their future, where the Captain will marry them on their trip abroad.

 

My other favorite book, which my good and dear, deceased friend, Bob gave me. I have

written how I met him and our friendship grew, from playing games on a picnic table

in the park, to his watching my two grandsons playing on the gym equipment there.

This is an everlasting gift, his memory pervades into my soul, which is perfectly fitting

in the book he gave me:

“The Keys of the Kingdom”

A. J. Cronin

(1941)

Little Brown and Co.

Boston, Mass.

This is a Scottish tale, with a priest named Father Chisholm. It begins with his limping up

a steep path from St. Columbia’s Parish (church) to his home that is walled in by gardens.

He looks out on a beautiful view described by the author,

“Beneath him was the River Tweed, a great wide sweep of placid silver, tinted by the low

saffron smudge of Autumn sunset.”

What a way with words you have, Mr. A. J. Cronin!

You can picture his wonder in the lovely description.

The book is filled with simple treasures, nuggets of wisdom and throughout it,

deep philosophy. The book takes a crooked path, through periods of time,  where

you need to re-read at time, to orient to what part of Father Chisholm’s life you

are in. There is never any doubt in Father Chisholm’s love, belief and faith in God.

His encounters and adventures are vast and absorbing, including danger and

Eastern culture, too.

 

At the end of the book, it closes with the Father going trout-fishing with a poor,

country lad named, Andrew. There is less infirmity in his step. There is added

purpose for living implied. His path has come full circle, back home again.

His adoption of Andrew has given him a

second chance on life.

 

I hope you enjoyed the tour of my books I shared today

along with the fascinating examples to view,

Online tour given through photographs,

or in person at University of Dayton.