Category Archives: Robert Redford

Comparison: 2 Survival Movies

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My family likes to discuss and analyze movies after we watch them.

There are two fine movies we watched where the theme was survival.

Both movies have been given critical acclaim and awards. They have

outstanding casts and performances. One is about man against the

sea while the other one is astronauts against the odds, up in Space.

My brothers, particularly, are science-oriented, while I am more into

character development and overall “impressions” or “feelings.” I liked

both of these movies, for different reasons. We agreed the following

movies are worth your time, if you have not already seen them:

 

1.  2013’s “All Is Lost,” with Robert Redford,  playing a man who has

decided to embark on an ocean adventure aboard a boat. It is directed

by J.C. Chandor, who also wrote the intensely fascinating screenplay.

This story is about a veteran and resourceful sailor lost at sea, in the

Indian Ocean, when the movie opens.

Having been a member of Mariner Scouts, co-ed sailing experiences

aboard sailboats on Lake Erie, I know I would not be fully prepared

for being stranded on a lake; let alone the barrage of challenges the

man is faced with in this film.

In most cases, the mariner (R. R.) is able to cope. For example, when

the boat fills up with water, he can use a hand operated pump to get

the water out of the boat. When he wishes to find his location, due

to loss of radio waves, he is forced to use a hand-held sexton. I was

amazed when I looked this navigational instrument up to find how

old this was. Before 1757, the sextant was built differently and was

called an ‘octant.’ Both devices use the angles of the sun’s position

to figure out location. It has to due with comparing two locations,

one can be ‘celestial’ and using the level of the water or the horizon,

as the other ‘fixed’ location. When the character is able to find a ‘busy

section of the ocean,’ which means it is a thoroughfare for water

vehicles, I am amazed.  But I believe this is possible due to his vast

knowledge about the sea. This is called ‘the shipping lanes’ in the

water of the ocean. He compares and measures them, using a map.

He is able to naviagate this way, which they show him carefully

calculating this procedure.

 

I don’t want to let you know any further details about this movie,

since you may sometime spend a few hours watching this great

actor, showing his ability to literally carry out many of the physical

tasks presented to him, as a strong, older man. Along with “carrying”

the whole movie on his shoulders, as an actor. My youngest brother

took it home from my Mom’s house, (where both brothers, Mom

and I had watched this) so that he could view this one more time.

This expresses something impressive to me. It means it was such a

powerful story, it captivated his interest enough to see it twice in one

weekend.  He will help ‘weigh in’ on the next movie’s review, too.

 

2.  2013’s “Gravity,” with Sandra Bullock and George Clooney

playing two astronauts with different levels of experience, while

out on a space shuttle proceeding through what was supposed to

be a routine journey.

This movie was co-written by and directed by Alfonso Cuaron. It is

“billed” as a science fiction thriller, but many scenes seem very real

and believable. The astronauts who watched the private screening,

were pleased, overall, with the emotions and the beautiful filmography.

They may have seen some imperfections and mentioned them, along

with flaws in the details. They probably were thrilled to have been

asked along for the ride, since there were not many complaints among

them.

My brothers both had a few times asked to ‘stop the movie,’ to rewind

along with discuss something that seemed to be ‘far-fetched.’ They

really felt the scene where the debris was flying at the astronauts,

shuold have sent them to hide behind the sturdy Hubble spacecraft.

Also, one brother felt that Matt (George Clooney’s character) should

have not been using up his extra energy and jet packs by ‘playing’

and ‘tooling around the stratosphere.’ He is often characterized as

an easy going character, this is true once again in the action movie,

“Gravity.” He has the qualities of ‘laid back’ and confident astronaut

definitely ‘down pat.’ Matt is senior officer and experienced veteran

while Sandra Bullock’s character, Ryan is on her first mission. She is

the medical engineer. There were ‘holes’ in her choices, not showing

a strong ability to think ‘outside the box,’ nor being aware of her

surroundings. (She passes some wires that are giving off sparks,

but doesn’t think about potential fire danger. I gave a sharp intake

of breath, with a strong premonition when she did this. It was very

apparent to me; so not sure why Ryan doesn’t notice them.)

There are a lot of loopholes in “Gravity’s” plot. Which if I mentioned

all of them then you may not be surprised when they occur. If you

are like I am, you prefer to hear a short synapsis and not be given too

many plot devices. I am sure that this would not be a good review if I

let you know too much ahead of time. Nor will I reveal the endings of

either movie I am talking about.

 

Summary of Mom’s and My Opinion on Both Movies:

The way Mom and I are, we were enthralled by the way Earth and

Space looked. The much played comment by Matt (George Clooney)

in movie trailers was (paraphrased), “Enjoy the view.” This would

be our strongest reason to suggest you see, “Gravity.” It is why people

leaving theaters would be so excited. There are many positives that

outweigh the negatives.

When Mom and I watch movies, it takes a major upset to get us

to give up on a movie. We would have probably let the problems

within the scientific and technical realm, ‘go.’

We sometimes sit together, leaning against each other or holding

hands. The excitement and danger in both “All Is Lost” and “Gravity”

seemed quite realistic. We held on tight in several parts of the man

facing eminent death upon the sea and when the astronauts kept

drifting away from secure holds on their positions. Both movies tell

engrossing stories, gripping and holding your attention.

 

We felt when “Gravity” was finished, (Mom and I) one must suspend

your disbelief and enjoy the adventure of the movie.

When we concluded our discussion about “All Is Lost,” we felt this

could have represented a real person’s experiences. At the end, we

wished we could learn his name. It seemed totally believable, which

makes this movie almost like you could be able to read an autobiography

of this man.

 

 

 

Tear-jerkers: Memorable plus Meaningful

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While discussing my recent movie reviews that were less than favorable, my friends

were suggesting I make a list of memorable and meaningful movies I would still

recommend despite sad, unusual or discouraging endings. This will help you to get

a better idea of my movie entertainment tastes and interests. Hopefully, this will

also spur some additions or explorations into movies you have not yet experienced.

 

I think that I may have overdone my expressing ‘dislike’ for “Gone Girl.” In the past,

while a younger and more adventurous woman, I may have hung on tightly to the

‘roller coaster ride’ of this fine, well-received movie. After all,  Jack Nicholson was

hugely entertaining in the suspenseful thriller movie, “The Shining.” Rosamunde

Pike was chilling in her portrayal of Amy, in “Gone Girl.” Reminds me how I did

enjoy Glenn Close’s psychotic character in 1987’s “Fatal Attraction.”

 

Lastly,  I hope to shed some light on the subject of movies, for ‘drop-in’s’ or new

visitors to my posts, who may think I am all sunshine and happy endings only!

 

Here is my List of Favorite Movies which are varied in subject matter, ‘genres’

and widely spaced in their production and release dates. They include ‘gooey’

love stories, star-crossed lovers,  along with ‘gory’ and intriguing plot lines.

 

1. “Deliverance,” a fine movie which featured great performances from both Ned

Beatty and Burt Reynolds. It was not pleasant, but it was informative and held my

interest throughout this feature. I am sure it won awards, too.

 

2. “Dr. Zhivago,” which probably did win an award for best song, “Lara’s Theme.”

If you loved this one, it may have been because you cherished the book, too. Julie

Christie was gorgeous, the scenery was captivating and I could not take my eyes off

of Omar Sharif. The historical element and the details were perfect, along with the

war-torn, epic love story.

 

3. “Diary of Anne Frank.” (No need to explain why this movie was significant. Along

with many of my mother’s friends thinking they chose exactly who should play this

role and Millie Perkins did an excellent job in the 1959 classic. The 2009 mini-series,

for television was a good one, to help bring awareness to another generation.)

 

4. “Casablanca,” made me fall in love with Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman.

This iconic love story included historical features and another war story.

“Play It Again, Sam,” although a friend informed me, it never was included in the

movie. It is implied by both the main characters asking for him to play  the song,

“As Time Goes By,” more than once. It became a common expression, most young

people even know where it (sort of) comes from…along with Woody Allen using it

later,  in his film title.

 

5. “Flowers in the Attic,” recently remade, done well for television. This is an example

of a fascinating, dark subject, including incestuous behavior. It was a great book with

a well written script. Louise Fletcher, who did an outstanding performance in this

movie, also portrayed Nurse Ratched in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

 

6. “Love Story,” which brought my Dad and me together, reading it, first in the Reader’s

Condensed Version, which came to our house. Then, he went right out and bought the

full  hard book version. Our whole family went to see the movie, knowing we would need

tissues, enjoying Ali McGraw and Ryan O’Neal, in their roles.  “Not a dry eye in the (movie

theater) house.”

 

7. “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” which I jokingly say is to blame for my vastly

inappropriate husbands. Paul Newman and Robert Redford played the bank robbers, who

up until the very end, did not use guns to hurt people. The last freeze-frame of the partners,

coming out of their hiding place, to the Mexicans shooting their guns, is unforgettable. I

also, surprised my parents, by taking our Encyclopedia Brittanica out when we got home,

finding the “Hole in the Wall Gang” article there. They had thought it was a fictional story,

and later, proud of the efforts of both Paul Newman and Robert Redford’s philanthropic

projects: “Newman’s Own” foods (sauces, dressings and other products) and “The Hole in

the Wall” children’s ranch for those disadvantaged kids, other benefits like scholarships

available.

 

8. “Saving Private Ryan,” which is another sad story but it is more realistic than most

war stories. I point this out due to my brothers and others who enjoyed John Wayne’s

versions of war while growing up. The Viet Nam movies, such as “Apocalypse Now”

and “Born on the Fourth of July,” include violence, drugs, Agent Orange and some

powerful, memorable characters.

 

9. “Brian’s Song,” which won a few awards, I am sure. Brian Piccolo, along with

his best friend made sports and cancer a household subject to talk about. If it could

happen to a young, vital athlete, it could happen to . . . anyone.

 

10. “Flowers for Algernon,” which had the futuristic subject of how drugs could

potentially raise a person’s I.Q.  If you never saw this one, it is very well done. This

makes you appreciate the way science fiction can be gently inserted into a movie,

without being overdone. Matthew Modine plays the man with retardation, in the

newer 2000 version,  Cliff Robertson was the fine actor to watch in,  “Charly.”

Both were based on the short story, “Flowers for Algernon.”

 

11. “Clockwork Orange,” which was a book I was required to read in high school. Our

class went to see the movie together. It is not everyone’s “cup of tea,” but it was a break-

through movie with fantastic performances by a young Malcolm McDowell and directing

by Stanley Kubrick.  Anthony Burgess’ science fiction book was disturbing, but has

significance and meaning. Visualizing the book did not match how powerful the film was.

Our classhad great discussions after viewing this, about what personal rights criminals,

particularly juveniles, deserve. Where the boundary of “Big Brother,” (government and

courts) also begins and ends.

 

12. “Romeo and Juliet, ” which broke the ground rules of lack of male nudity prior to

this movie in the 70’s. I think you may know why anyone would like all versions of

this movie, since it is considered ‘classical’ to love Shakespeare.

 

13. “West Side Story,” with the Hispanics and Caucasians fighting over their areas

of the city or ‘turfs’ among rival gangs. A beautiful love story, with music and great

choreography. The movie’s ending could disappoint you, if you did not know it was

based on #12’s book and movie themes.

 

14. “Out of Africa,” which was absorbingly written by Isak Dinesen. It has Robert

Redford, Meryl Streep, many British actors and the scenery is outstanding. What a

magnificent love story!  The ending made my Mom and me weep in July, while we

watched this for our ‘umpteenth’ time. What I could not get over, this recent viewing,

was how young the two leading actors were, when they made this movie.

 

15. “White Fang,” other Jack London stories, have the naturalistic side of ‘survival of the

fittest,’ along with beautiful Alaskan and other frontiers featured. The 1991 movie, with

Ethan Hawke was ‘panned,’ by critics, given the “Rotten Tomato” award.

 

16. “Dallas Buyers Club,” AIDS and Matthew McConahey, along with the wonderful

supporting actors and actresses, made this a rich, intelligent, humor-sprinkled movie

about a serious subject. I liked Jared Leto’s sympathetic portrayal of a transvestite.

 

17. “Philadelphia,” with Tom Hanks. Need I say more? Fantastic movie, need your

tissues but I watched it again recently, it still ‘holds up’ to the test of time, my gauge

or ‘thermometer.’ Wide variety of actors, along with exploring our fears of HIV and

Aids in a movie. Bruce Springsteen’s song, “Philadelphia,” is hauntingly beautiful.

 

18. “Fargo,” the Coen brothers have done funnier, (“Raising Arizona” with Holly

Hunter and Nicholas Cage) but this one is the ONE that hangs in my mind, lingering.

If you were to compare it to anything else, in the way of ‘thrillers’ they would ‘pale.’

Great writing skills! Frances McDormand is excellent in capturing the Minnesota

accent and delivering a pregnant police woman realistic, classic  lines. William H.

Macy and Steven Buscemi are outstanding in their quirky parts.

 

19. “Steel Magnolias” had Julia Roberts dying. What else do you need to know? Many

famous actresses, including Dolly Parton, Sally Fields, and Shirley Maclaine bring

the comic relief. Good support from the male actors in this movie, also.

 

20. “Terms of Endearment,” with Shirley Maclaine, Jack Nicholson. Debra Winger

is dying. The family dynamics and the careful writing is a good combination, realistic

and gritty at times. Jeff Daniels plays the husband, who is not likable, a switch from

his typical roles.

 

I did not add a lot of old, classic and Iconic movies, since I know there are much better

critics of these, so please share… (like “The Count of Monte Cristo” or “In the Name of

the Rose.”)

 

What melodramatic movies do you enjoy, despite not always being popular with the

critics?

How do you like to escape into movies? Through romance, drama, action or historical

fiction or ??

These Boots. . .

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Of course, this is one example of how just the beginning words of a song

can send you back in time, evoke memories or irritate you, depending on

the particular words! “These boots are made for walking…” sung by Nancy

Sinatra, came out in February, 1966. The lyrics and melody were written

by Lee Hazelwood.

Of course, these boots were an example of figurative speech and they were

usually viewed during this era to be, “go go boots!” I would like to switch over

to pre-Civil War days, when good ole’ cowboy boots were more prevalent.

Some interesting facts are they came about due to necessity, ability to handle

all sorts of inclement weather and using leather to hold up, for the long haul.

I had not realized that the heels were made to be tall, to be able to latch onto

the stirrups on the side of the horse, attached to the saddle.

Many of you out West and South know the purpose to cowboy boots, I always

viewed them as ‘cute’ boots that my brothers wore with their leather vests

and chaps, along with the accompaniment of a “Sheriff” badge, made out of

stamped tin silver.

My oldest daughter was quite fond of the ability to slide her tights-encased

feet into her Daddy’s little boy cowboy boots. They were made of  rugged dark

brown leather with tan stitching, that looked like ropes lassoing and winding

around. She had discovered that the more you wear the leather boots, the more

they ‘fit’ and conform to your feet.

I loved the way she was my ‘frilly’ girl, wearing dresses into her grade school

years. Those cowboy boots were easy to slip on, then clomp around in, making

quite a racket on hardwood floors! The third year she saw Santa Claus in her life,

with her wearing a pretty Christmas dress and white tights on, is my favorite

pose of hers wearing boots! No ‘go go boots,’ for her! I have a picture of her

wearing a pair of high heeled black dress boots on the day of her best friend,

Jennifer’s 21st birthday that nearly meets the high emotions I get when I see her

on that Christmas, 1983!

When I saw Willie Nelson’s photograph, in a beautiful pair of smooth and

shiny black leather cowboy boots,  inside of my recent “AARP Magazine” and

gracing the cover of my daughter’s “Rolling Stones” magazine, too. Later after

getting my mail seeing the still ‘mighty fine’ man, Jeff Bridges on the outside

cover. Then inside he is talking about his days in western movies, like “Crazy

Heart”  and “True Grit,” (remade) where he wore cowboy boots. . .

I just had to learn more about cowboy boots!

There is an author, Jennifer June, whose recent book, “Art and Sole,” came

out with all kinds of modern pieces of artwork in decorating cowboy boots

that is well worth skimming and like I did, looking at the fantastic art on

current boots. Isn’t that the cleverest title?

Side tracking,  I enjoyed years ago (1993) a great movie, called, “Heart and

Souls.” If you wish to think of what is happening in the hearafter, with a

big dose of humor and fun,  check out this one! I am so pleased that the

members of this movie, are all still with us, gracing the ‘silver screen.’

With Robert Downey, Jr., Alfre Woodard, Charles Grodin, Elisabeth Shue

and Kyra Sedgwick, this is a four star movie cast!

The subject of cowboy boots, with its incredible industry with various

successful companies really could fill  several books! Country western stars,

some who may have never ridden a horse grace the musical scene. The show,

“Nashville,” made it through two seasons, I believe.

“Red Wings,” is a big name in cowboy boots and work boots, too. The artists

who are part of the company, “Rocket Busters,” stitch and design, paint and

create flair using boot leather as their “canvas.” Looking at many of the lovely

patterns, I decided if I ever lived near horses, were going out to enjoy a date

with a cowboy, I would choose their “Chandelier” design. Another company to

check out, its roots in Texas, is Justin Brand Boots, or simply “Justin’s boots.”

In honor of Willie Nelson I will share a few of his passions:

He loves the woman he married in 1991, Annie. He loves his sons and thinks that

when them, Micah, Lucas and he play their guitars and sing, they are ‘as good as

it gets.’ For 50 years or more, his sister, Bobbie, has been part of his bus touring

group. His two daughters, Amy and Lana, also like to travel on the road with

him.

He is a big supporter of migrant workers, enjoys seeking home grown vegetables

and fruits, in a fair market value system. He is supportive of farmers all across

the world. Willie is 81 and just passed this fifth degree black belt in Korean

martial arts!

Willie’s song on his album, “Band of Brothers,” I recommend to you. It is

called, “I’ve Got a Lot of Traveling to Do.” Willie passé on this final thought in

his recent article,  he admits it is not original but worth repeating!

“Don’t slow down – – –

They might be gaining on you!”

Cowboy Boots:

Roy Rogers wore them.

 

Roy made the boots quite popular!

I cannot help myself, I wanted you to know Roy’s ‘real’ name was Leonard

Franklin Slye, he lived from 1911 – 1998, with his second wife and he making

it to 51 years together! Known as the “King of Cowboys,” he seemed to deserve

this legendary title.

 

Dale Evans wore them.

Elvis wore them.

Governor Rick Perry wears them.

Both Presidents Bush, Senior and Junior wore them.

 

Do you wear them?

 

I had a babysitter who lived out on a farm, her children and I liked to feed the

baby lambs baby bottles of milk. This was in her farmhouse kitchen in the

winter time. I loved being out in the country but have never owned a pair of

cowboy boots! I guess living in a town,(Sandusky, Ohio) then close to a big city,

(Cleveland) I considered myself a ‘city’ girl!

 

If I decide to go out and buy some cowboy boots, do you have a favorite brand

to recommend I try?

 

 

 

We’re Among Friends, Right?

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At the risk of appearing immodest or vulgar, let me say those under

50 plus years may not want to read this! I have spent over 20 years

walking with a couple of girlfriends, with covering the whole gamut

of subjects. We cannot believe we have come to the topics we now

discuss. Some of these are ones I’m sure if we had had a crystal ball

to search and gaze into back in our thirties, we would have been so

shocked to hear the things coming out of our mouths!

Here are a few comments about each subject matter, hopefully not

too shocking these days with what is on commercials and more open

discussions, too. Here in no particular order or priority are what has

come up lately:

“Why do bald men have such long and curling hair coming out of their

ears and other places like the back of their neck?”

“Why do I have a couple of odd and errant places that I need to weed

whack with my razor on my chin, upper lip and neck?”

“Do you ever feel that you need to try some of those enhancement 

products to make everything “smooth sailing?” (For examples “warming

gel,” “personal lubricant, or “pure pleasure arousal gel?”)

“Does your partner need to try the products for erectile dysfunction?”

(I once had a partner who really did think if God intended him to have

an erection, than he would have one. Otherwise, there was no need 

for sexual intercourse since we already had procreated. I wanted to

scream! “But what about God’s gift of intelligence that created such

products and medicines? Also, why on earth do some men’s sex 

drive go the opposite direction from their wives? And, visa versa.)

Last, but not least of recent topics, from a movie way back when

we were in our thirties, (1993) “Indecent Proposal.” If I had been

approached by Robert Redford in that time period, I would have

been 38 years old, still single then! Yes! Yes! I would have taken

a million dollars and had sex with his character in that movie.

I could not believe Demi Moore’s character and her husband,

Woody Harrelson’s character debating about such a subject!

Oh, yes, I do know this is totally irreverent to marriage and its

sacred sanctimony. But come on! Once and you are rich!!

I believe that we have covered enough stuff but will not venture

into the gross subjects that include the leakage from different

orifices and the products and pads needed to correct and 

collect such matter.

We have gone over the line today, I am sure! But, we are 

among friends, aren’t we?

 

Typing Class troublemakers

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The class sounds so archaic: “Typing 101.” In our classroom,

my high school friends and I had a blast there! I am talking

about some girls and guys who usually stayed out of trouble and

got excellent grades.

We were the ‘brown nosers’ and the ‘goody two shoes’ most of

our high school career. In this class we were sometimes called

to the front of the class, got low C grades and could barely

concentrate on our assignments!

What made us go a little crazy in typing class? We were assigned

some letter writing tasks that made us decide to not only be a little

creative but a little ‘dirty,’ too. We were writing to each other and

when we would have to hand them in, our typing teacher would

roll her eyes and seem to get exasperated! (Too bad, it is too late

to ask her; “Did we entertain you?” Hope so!)

This is what we wrote about: movies and specifically, our place in

famous peoples’ lives! Each of the young girls in our tight knit group

had chosen a famous person to be married to. So, Becky was Mrs.

Redford, I was Mrs. Newman, Diane was Mrs. Hoffman, etc. We also

included a couple of guys who were happy to be married to Farrah

Fawcett and Cheryl Tiegs.

What on earth was the reason? Because we thought it would make our

letter writing tasks more unique and interesting. So, I could write that

I went to a fantastic movie premiere, checked in with the babysitter on

our car phone and then went to an “after party.” Or I could mention to

my dear friend, Becky, that I needed to borrow that cute red bandana

top to go sit in the grandstands to watch my husband, Paul, race his

car towards the finish line! It made the tasks bearable and fun!

I forget who was married to Steve McQueen but you can bet she wrote

about the amazing stunts he did himself in “Bullitt” or in “Le Mans.”

I also forget all the wandering adventures that Mrs. Warren Beatty

engaged in, but she was every bit as racy and naughty as her husband!

Each of us pushed the indecency a little to include sexual encounters,

swinging experiences and dangerous situations. All while trying to

stay connected as friends and learning about our own sexual desires.

 

Did you ever engage in such escapism or fantasies while in high school?

Do you want to or dare to comment?

The Way We Were

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I cannot help but refer to that movie and that song.

First of all, I love the characters, the acting and the

time period. Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford are

very good in that movie and the song gives me chills

along with tears.

There are lots of reasons why the words are so poignant

and true to life, but mostly because every good and new

relationship holds so much promise and hope. Those

emotions are universal, turn the volume off, look at any

nation in the world’s love stories and they are always

going to  have similar elements. Some regret and some

wistfulness when the couple break up and don’t make it.

This theme will be repeated from now until kingdom come,

due to love’s mysterious and complicated meaning, most of us

want to know how it works, how can we make it work, is it really

possible, etc. It is carried out in a variety of genres including some

comedies and tragedies alike.

What happens between the time when 2 people meet, fall in

love and everything seems so new and fresh to the time when they

are ready to kill each other?  (The movie, “War of the Roses” is supposed

to be a comedy or a ‘dramedy,’ but it is almost dreadfully, painfully true to

life, or at least in your imagination of divorce.) If you are part of the fifty

percent that are in a good marriage what do you attribute it to? I frequently

ask people how did you know? How did it feel? Do you really think we put on a

different face or act a different way, then we finally relax and become worse

to the loved person than to our friends or even, enemies?

Do all people change and become different that are

divorced/broken up? Is it all a hoax or a game or?

I cannot understand how some people know fairly early that it is love

and are very successful in their relationship or marriage for many years.

I happened to recently call it all a “potshot.” I think that

some partners seem so different right from the beginning yet they

can survive and then others so close, (all their shared values, goals

and dreams lined up) and still don’t make it.

Sometimes when I am dating a divorced man or someone

coming out of a long term relationship, I ask them why it didn’t

work out. This is a bold and somewhat chancy move, daring to annoy

the man. Yet it is hanging there, I have to kind of tread lightly on that

tough question, “what happened to your marriage (relationship?)

In the end, the answer may not still give you a clue to why it ended because

we all carry around our pat answers to tough questions. We all have our own

version of reality. The one we can live with…