Category Archives: Roman Catholics

Lighting up one’s life and others

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Debby Boone’s song came over the radio waves one morning this week and I nearly

wept. I had forgotten those words. At the time her song came out in 1977, it was a busy

time and I heard it ‘everywhere,’ it seemed. “You Light Up My Life,” is one I felt blessed

by hearing  and listening to the lyrics, over  and over  again. I was in college back then,

junior year, working hard to keep my life in balance. Books, studies, projects and I had

just been proposed to. Plans for marrying in 1978 were at the top of my list of concerns.

The song’s meaning is full of ripe opportunities for growth helping me understand, even

today, how true love feels, whether towards a friend, family member or life partner.

 

As time goes by, it is with great joy when a familiar, uplifting song spreads its warmth

upon my heart. Like a forgotten gift, found tucked away in a box or unused drawer.

Bringing it out, unwrapping it from tissue or a cloth, there it is.

 

Debby’s message here is for ‘everyday’ but also helps my Sunday. Hope it sheds ‘Light’

upon your week.:

“Blessings are like hugs from God,

To let you know how much He loves you.

Counting blessings is like hugging God back.”

(Found in January, 2001.)

 

Here is some Scripture from the Bible which I will be ‘using’ as a kick off for two

religious jokes. (Blasphemous!)

“Be joyful always;

Pray continually;

Give thanks in all circumstances.”

1 Thessalonians 5:18.

 

Funny Old Fashioned Story #1:

Sister Margaret Ann, who worked for a Home Health Agency, was out making her rounds

visiting homebound patients when she ran out of gas. As luck would have it, a Texaco

gasoline station was just a block away.

She walked to the station to borrow a gas can and buy some gas. The attendant told her

that the only gas can he owned, had already been loaned out. She could wait until it was

returned. Since Sister Margaret Ann was on the way to see another client, she decided

not to wait. She walked back to her car. She looked for something in her car which she

could fill with gas. Every resourceful, she spied the bedpan she was taking to the poor

bedridden soul. Sister Margaret Ann carried the bedpan back to the gas station, filled it

with gasoline. Then she carried the full bedpan back to her car.

As she was pouring the gas into her tank, two Jehovah’s Witness young men rode by on

their bicycles. One of them turned to the other and exclaimed,

“If that car starts, I’m changing faith and going to become a Catholic.”

(“In God We Trust” is all I have to say to this one!)

 

A Revival Funny Story #2:

A minister was completing a temperance sermon. With great emphasis he shouted,

“If I had all the beer in the world, I’d take it and pour it into the river.”

 

With even more enthusiasm, he exclaimed,

“And if I had all the wine in the world, I’d take it and pour it into the river.”

 

Finally, shaking his fist dramatically into the air, he declared:

“If I had all the whiskey in the world, I’d take it and pour it into the river.”

 

The Sermon in the Tent Revival concluded.

The Pastor sat down beside the Choir Leader.

The Choir Leader stood up and walked to the middle of the front of the congregation.

With some trepidation and with a small smirk, holding back laughter she announced:

“Let us sing Hymn #365,

“Shall We Gather at the River.”

(I’ll see you at that river next weekend, ha ha!)

 

Have a joyful week, my friends!

Rare Books

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The unique, exquisite first edition rare books collection is awe-inspiring.

This includes many books you will know and love. It includes international

books, on loan for a brief period, from September 29 until November 9, 2014.

A man named Stuart Rose, started collecting books that were special to him.

Rose’s collection began when he found in 1992, the First Edition of,

“Tarzan,”

by

Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Rose went on collecting past 2000 First Edition or

“One of a Kind” books.

There are 49 featured books,

displayed on

University of Dayton

campus,

in the

Roesch Library

First Floor

Gallery.

 

I love the title of the exhibition:

 

“Imprints

and

Impressions”

 

Part

of

the

“Milestones

in

Human Progress”

Program:

 

Highlights

from the

Rose Rare Book

Collection

 

There are directions online

you may follow to get to

the place you need to go.

 

Jane Austen’s

“Pride

and

Prejudice,”

Quote:

“The spoken word passes away, while the written word remains.”

 

Paul H. Benson,

essayist for the

Dayton UD Alum

Magazine

reminded

us of the

Essence

and

Importance

of:

Preserving books while time marches forward

some day society may feel we don’t ‘need’ them.

These are our own printed legacy and heritage.

(Not quoted, but read and digested. Explaining

and passing on my feeling of urgency to see this

magnificent book collection before it goes away.)

 

Here are some favorites of mine:

The

“Qu’ran”

Copied

in

Beautifully

Intricate

Calligraphy

by

Aziz

Khan

Kashmiri

(1864)

 

Galileo,

“Starry Messenger”

(1610)

 

Mark Twain,

“Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

(1885)

 

Isaac Newton,

(Misspelled words,

intentionally copied as

Newton

chose to do.)

“Opticks

or a Treatise

of the

Reflexions, Refractions

Inflexions and Colours

of

Light.

Also,

Two Treatises

of the

Species and Magnitude

of

Curvilinear Figures”

(1704)

 

Ralph Ellison,

“Invisible Man”

(1952)

 

Virginia Woolf,

“A Room of One’s Own”

(1929)

 

J. R. R. Tolkien,

“The Lord of the Rings”

Hand-written

Proofs,

with final edits

done in pen.

(1953 – 1955)

 

Geoffrey Chaucer,

“Canterbury Tales”

(1492)

 

Rene Descartes,

“Discourse on the Method”

(1637)

 

William Shakespeare,

“Comedies, Histories and Tragedies”

(1632)

 

Nicholas Copernicus,

“On the Revolution of Celestial Spheres”

(1543)

 

*I would love to see*

Artistic

Illustrations

drawn by

Salvador Dali,

“Alice in Wonderland”

(1969)

 

There are more books to examine and admire.

 

There is a special informative talk by former

UD graduate and famous person,

Daniel De Simone,

about the Rose exhibit on:

October 16, 2014,

7:00 – 8:30 p.m

 

Daniel De Simone is

Librarian at the

Folger Shakespeare Library,

Washington, D. C.

(Formerly worked at

Library of Congress)

Lecture topic:

“Why the Stuart Rose Book Collection

Matters in the Age of Digital Surrogates.”

 

Since I have two First Edition books that are not ‘rare’ nor very great condition,

I felt the power of words would be expressed better personally, if I told you about

my books.

“Magnificent Obsession,”

Lloyd C. Douglas

(1929)

P.F. Collier and Sons, Company

New York, New York.

The book begins with a physician given as, “Doctor Hudson.” His mental and physical

condition is described as “on the verge of a collapse,” along with “all but dead on his feet.”

We can all relate, in one way or another, to this man who is trying to be the best doctor

he can. Reminding us of that often expressed, “Physician heal thyself.”

Then comes a “twist of fate.”

I love this book, which was made into a movie. (Although, it changes some of the details,

making it a different story entirely.)

In the end of the book, another doctor is mentioned, if you were not aware of the accident

you might wonder who this character is. “Doctor Hudson” is no longer the focus. The reader

has come to know and love a different man, you see.

This story has turned from a solitary life of medicine to one where there is someone named,

“Bobby.”

He plans on boarding a train, then disembarking to go on a big steamer ship.

The love of his life, (you need to read the book to find out how he met her!)

“Mauve” approaches with what the author describes as, “a snug, saucy, cloche hat” on

her head and she is wearing, “a tailored suit of mauve that sculptures every curve of

her body.” She embraces him and the rest of the happy ending comes in his plans for

their future, where the Captain will marry them on their trip abroad.

 

My other favorite book, which my good and dear, deceased friend, Bob gave me. I have

written how I met him and our friendship grew, from playing games on a picnic table

in the park, to his watching my two grandsons playing on the gym equipment there.

This is an everlasting gift, his memory pervades into my soul, which is perfectly fitting

in the book he gave me:

“The Keys of the Kingdom”

A. J. Cronin

(1941)

Little Brown and Co.

Boston, Mass.

This is a Scottish tale, with a priest named Father Chisholm. It begins with his limping up

a steep path from St. Columbia’s Parish (church) to his home that is walled in by gardens.

He looks out on a beautiful view described by the author,

“Beneath him was the River Tweed, a great wide sweep of placid silver, tinted by the low

saffron smudge of Autumn sunset.”

What a way with words you have, Mr. A. J. Cronin!

You can picture his wonder in the lovely description.

The book is filled with simple treasures, nuggets of wisdom and throughout it,

deep philosophy. The book takes a crooked path, through periods of time,  where

you need to re-read at time, to orient to what part of Father Chisholm’s life you

are in. There is never any doubt in Father Chisholm’s love, belief and faith in God.

His encounters and adventures are vast and absorbing, including danger and

Eastern culture, too.

 

At the end of the book, it closes with the Father going trout-fishing with a poor,

country lad named, Andrew. There is less infirmity in his step. There is added

purpose for living implied. His path has come full circle, back home again.

His adoption of Andrew has given him a

second chance on life.

 

I hope you enjoyed the tour of my books I shared today

along with the fascinating examples to view,

Online tour given through photographs,

or in person at University of Dayton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Art: Breastfeeding

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Lost art sculptures of the Mother Mary, destroyed by the Catholic

Church in the 1600’s have become a part of an art study grant by

a University of Dayton Religious Studies assistant professor. As

someone who loves art, I wondered why religious sculptures of

the beloved Mother Mary would be desecrated? It turns out they

were specifically ones where Mother Mary is breast-feeding the

Baby Jesus. This fascinates me, I will look forward to reading her

research and the 2016 release of her book publication.

The assistant professor, Neomi DeAnda is rediscovering the beauty

in the sculptures that are available in the depiction of this natural

act of providing mother’s milk to Jesus. I like this sentence given,

“Mary, the Mother of God, nurtured her Son to be the Redeemer of

Humankind.” (I inserted capital letters, making the words emphasized

where I felt the reader would take notice.)

Ms. DeAnda’s art grant award of $40,000, is to help her in her research

and a gift of time to study the different sources she will need to find

examples. Her book will be titled, “Theology of Breast Milk:  A Latina

Perspective.” The Louisville Foundation would be where you could go

for any future support of writing about art and literature, possibly of

religious content. “She is pulling together publications, art, personal

narratives, and popular devotions to examine the topic of breast-feeding

in the Bible and throughout church history.” (Source, University of

Dayton, “UD Magazine.”)

I like that Neomi DeAnda gives her reasoning for this subject matter

as important and current to our society today,

“My hope is that it will lead to good discussions about women breast-

feeding today and what it means practically and spiritually.”

My experiences with this were varied, depending on which of my three

children I was breast-feeding. My first baby, oldest daughter Carrie,

was a fussy baby. She had ‘colic,’ according to the pediatrician. I tried

to do this, was able to feed her three times a day and twice during the

nights, until I had to go back to teaching. Then, unfortunately, my milk

seemed to ‘seep out’ or leak when I needed to be nursing her, which was

not easily scheduled. I did have my lunch hour to go across the street,

where my babysitter lived. This was probably her ‘best’ and most filling

time that I accomplished daily. She was born on March 29th, so I ‘hung

in there,’ with my mother-in-law supporting me, until summer break.

Then, I really was able to double up, get her more filled up, which helped

my self-esteem. I managed to nurse Carrie, until she was a little over 6

months old. At the incredible age of 6 months, she absolutely ‘floored’

me!

I went to get her out of her crib after a nap and Carrie was standing up,

holding onto her crib rails. I promptly pushed her back onto her bottom,

saying firmly, “No, not yet!” She continued to do this, crawled to the

coffee table and did the same thing. I have photos to prove this, too.

My Mom said it was ‘paybacks’ since she and Dad have photos of my

doing the very same thing, at six months’ old. Anyway, Carrie was not

able to sit still, lie under my shirt, in public places after that. She was

way to ‘hyper’ or curious. She would ‘sip’ for a little bit, then stop, pull

my shirt up and smile at people. My Dad was used to my doing this,

but I was embarrassed when she did this over the holidays with my

father in law. I started weaning her, although I now know I could have

‘pumped’ and given it to her in a sippy cup. She was using her cup,

instead of a bottle with meals. In the ‘old days,’ I would feed her rice

cereal mixed with pasteurized apple juice for breakfast, mashed sweet

potatoes for lunch, and for dinner, I would put our stew, other foods

into  the food processor and make a ‘dinner’ out of it. We still had a

month of my nursing her at bedtime, before it all dried up.

Anyway, hope that the men who are reading this either skipped it,

recognized their wife or daughter in this, or just plain like to know about

what we women go through, all in the name of Love!

I love my Mom, but she was rather negative about breast-feeding. She

was told by her having eczema, that she should not breast-feed. This did

not help me, since she was using the glucose bottles that they gave me

for Carrie, at the hospital to keep her from crying. This made her tummy

full, which meant she did not suck hard enough, did not stay with it long

enough those first few weeks. Once Mom went home, I was able to do

fairly well, as mentioned back to work… I support this natural way of

feeding your baby, but wish to remind you to check any and all sources

of suggested foods. I found out the ‘hard’ way that babies don’t do well

with onions nor spicy foods! My sister-in-law was for years a La Leche

League leader. She still has women calling her, since she has such a positive

story to share. Good pointers. She was not around, my younger brother had

not met her, when I had my babies.

My second baby, my son “Sweet Baby James” otherwise known to this day

as Jamie, was a great nursing baby. My Mom allowed my mother-in-law to

come for his first weeks of life, while she took Carrie off to my parents’ house

for fun and goofy games with my Dad. The pictures from this time include

Carrie in a paper grocery bag, in a box, in a baby swimming pool and the

bath tub. My parents were ‘lucky’ and had retired at 55 and 58 years young!

Jamie continued nursing until 9 months old which I ended when he used

his teeth and I did not have the heart to squeeze his cheeks or give him a

‘tap’ to stop him from biting. My next baby, Felicia, nursed until over a year

old. She was the most laid back, plumpest little ‘punkin’ dunkin’ you ever

could imagine! I had learned not to feed her solids early, also not to allow

sugar or glucose water bottles to come home from the hospital. I was a ‘pro’

at the art of breast-feeding and was one who became a few of my friends’

coach on the subject. I loved eating dairy products, including yogurt, ice

cream and cottage cheese. I ate a wide variety of vegetables and fruits,

plus I did like chicken, fish and some red meat. I continued to take my

pre-natal vitamins, a plus for baby’s brain power. To this day, if you saw

her baby photographs, you would swear Felicia was the Gerber baby!

The sculptural art of Mother Mary nursing her son, Jesus is such a

wonderful testament for motherhood. In the Catholic faith, Mother Mary

is revered and treasured. I know there are some Christian faiths, I used to

belong to one of the evangelical churches that found it to be a ‘sin’ in such

respectful love of Mother Mary. Somehow, I could not stay with this faith,

because it haunts me, truly does, that this Mother knew she was given the

gift of the Son of God, (in some faiths) and had to also know the pain and

suffering he would face, as he grew up and had to lay down his life on the

cross. If you are Jewish, as my nephew in law is, you still know that Mother

Mary existed, that she did have a son and she did lose her son to this painful

death. Jerry knows this, since the Jewish ones were told this story, just the

fact that he is not considered God’s son is part of their religion.

Everyone I have ever met, who has traveled into other countries, enjoys

and photographs the beautiful, magnificent churches around the world.

It doesn’t matter what you believe, it will always be art. The fact that Neomi

DeAnda is looking into the destruction of art, hoping to uncover more than

a few pieces, in paintings, sculptures and written documents of this special

and natural process of feeding a baby is commendable.

“Lassie” and Television’s Progress

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On Friday, September 12, 2014, 60 years of television had passed by, since “Lassie’s”

first debut episode. The show was simple, meaningful and encompassed all areas of

rural living, (1954 – 1973). When they list the ‘longest lasting television series,’ they

place this show close to top of the list.

 

The years I remember the show, “Lassie,” best had June Lockhart as portraying my

favorite mother of all time. The father was genuinely well-acted by Hugh Reilly and

my favorite little boy, “Timmy,” was played by Jon Provost.

 

Although the leading “human” roles changed over the years, there was always the

faithful dog, “Lassie.” (Many dogs played this role, of course, through the years.) I

enjoyed the various transitions of “Lassie,” having family values and including life

lessons.

 

Fast forward to September and October, 2014 for the New Fall, 2014 television

season.

It would be nearly impossible to picture most of the newest additions to our current

television programming to last ten years, let alone 19 years.

 

The “CSI” and “NCIS” shows are still going strong and on this Fall’s t.v. line-up.

I am going to miss having the original show, “CSI,” with its location of Las Vegas,

when it moves to its new Sunday evening slot. Sunday is my favorite ‘catch up’ night,

with PBS, Hallmark and I still am a big fan of “Once Upon A Time” and “Revenge.”

The new Fall line up is already getting over-crowded on my own Sunday night.

 

I was talking to a good friend who thinks some of the shows sound “silly” and was

pointing out a Columbus Dispatch critic thought Debra Messing would be hard to

imagine being a cop, in the new show called, “”Mysteries of Laura.”

Since I would first respond, I love the silly show, “Mike and Molly.” I may be quite

blasphemous to say that “Mike” would NEVER make it on a real police force, due

to his large size…

Criticism from someone who loves all kinds of wild SyFy shows like, “Haven” and

“Eureka,”  and on regular network t.v., “Under the Dome,” should be wondering

about their own ways they stretch their imagination! I am laughing with you; not

at you, my friend!

 

Can you suspend your sense of disbelief and let your imagination go?

I remember the funny ways we learned, as children to open our ‘escape hatches’

and step into the Lands of Wonderment.

 

I shall try all the shows with female-driven plot lines. They have had ‘good fortune’

in the past. Imagine “The Good Wife” not being on,  not receiving another round of

Emmy Award nominations. I think it is nice to see women in professional situations,

not wearing an ‘apron’ and carrying out the character of a ‘housewife and mother.’

This is not to say that I don’t enjoy programs that have women who have chosen to

stay at home to do

this very important job and having this be part of the plot line, too. Choices are what

makes this a different world from the Fifties and Sixties’ television programming.

 

“We’ve Come a Long Way, Baby!”

I like the characters in this sweet little show about a single mother with a son, you may

recognize him from big screen movies, I “About a Boy.” I am sadly not pleased with

where they tucked this show into a 9:30 time slot. It is ‘not cute’ but original and quirky.

We, if you are a viewer, are ‘rooting’ for the handsome neighbor man to become the single

mother’s date. Although it is about a boy, it is definitely about the mother, too. Having

raised 3 children on my own, I am particularly happy to watch this one. I also like the

upcoming role of Katherine Heigl getting another chance on television in “State of

Affairs.” While Katherine Heigl left “Grey’s Anatomy,” definitely getting better comedic

roles in movies, she is still sorely missed as the character of “Izzy,” on that show. I am

looking forward to seeing her as a CIA agent. She was funny in “One for the Money,” a

movie based on the hilarious antics of a bondswoman in more than 20 books by Janet

Evanovich.

 

If you liked Tea Leoni’s funny past roles you may have seen her show her acting chops

in serious dramas, too. We will see which direction she heads in, “Madame Secretary.”

She was one of the wackiest women on television for 2 years in a show called, “The Naked

Truth.”

 

I have read a decent review of “Red Band Society.” It is not a “Breakfast Club,” nor

is it one that will be all laughs, but will tackle diseases and illnesses with a touch of

humor and give it an uplifting spin. It is a group of young people who are ones who

have hospital experiences, who are dealing with personal challenges. I picture it more

like the movie, “Stand By Me,” in its tone and togetherness. It is about a ‘band

of young misfits.’

 

Critics are harsh when it comes to some and not so much with others. I remember

when I discovered, “How I Met Your Mother.” It was before the critics endorsed it,

awhile back. I am sad how they chose to end it, with the death of the mother but

happy the main gal, Robin, got her ‘man.’

 

The serious shows genre are tougher to predict. I would imagine Scott Backula will

knock the New Orleans’ version of “NCIS” out of the park. I happen to have liked his

‘goofy’ portrayal of character in “Quantum Leap.” I am not sure about, “Stalkers,” but

will support Dylan McDermott, since he is still okay after all these years since his role

as a non-supportive ‘husband’ for Julia Robert’s dying ‘wife’ role in “Steel Magnolias.”

 

Another serious plot line can be found in “Gracepoint.” (Not to be confused with the

CIA/FBI show about the safe house, “Graceland.”) David Tennant, from the British

show, “Broadchurch,”and Anna Gunn are two strong actors that will head up the

already critically-acclaimed and well-promoted television show. This show is set in a

fictional California coastal community.

 

I think that the “Forever” show that is listed on two consecutive days, for its kick-off

first two episodes sounds good.  Sadly, I lost “Journeyman” and also another traveling

through  time show just in the past two years. I will hope this one ‘sticks’ because I like

the concept. I used to enjoy “Time Tunnel” on television and “Back to the Future,” on

the movie screen.

 

I have been a fan of Josh Dushamel ever since the show, “Vegas.” I have enjoyed his

forte into romantic comedies, too. The actor, Dushamel will be on a new show called,

“Battle Creek,” This will be loosely based on likely crimes to be found in Battle Creek,

Michigan. His co-star/partner will be that of Dean Winters. You will recognize him,

but not necessarily ‘place’ him. I will check this one out simply because I love crime-

solving television series.

 

I will return to comedies. This is what a good friend in Lancaster, Ohio mentioned

when we turned 50: “Try to laugh more, watch comedies!”

I came up with a slogan, which I will hope no one else has coined:

“Humor is found in the ‘ear’ of the listener.”

(“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”)

So, if you liked “My Favorite Martian” did you ever try 2 seasons of “Neighbors?”

I think not, since it did not make it. This was clever, witty writing with four likable

adults, along with poking fun at Suburbia. I will miss this, unless it is on a later

schedule, it did not make the ‘cut.’

 

If you liked “Scrubs,” you probably followed the guy who was the janitor on over

into “The Middle,” who became the ever patient, sometimes ‘clueless’ Dad in this

sit-com. This also includes Patricia Heaton, who played the Mom/wife roles in

“Everyone Loves Raymond.”

 

If you liked “Taxi,” “Barney Miller” and “Psych,” you may have discovered last year’s

Emmy-awarding comedy, “Brooklyn 9-9.” Hilarious, quirky and goofy at times, but

watch out, you may laugh out loud anyway.

 

I am wishing that Nielson’s Rating chart were in my mailbox, because I had such a

lovely time about eight years ago, studying and analyzing the television Fall Season

Line-ups back then. The first time I had the full control of a remote control.  I wrote

some comprehensive and profuse notes for those receiving my multiple page Nielson

Ratings Report. I  am not a paid writer nor do I write for a newspaper. I was able to

honestly say this, it was all for the love of television and the future of programming

that I was inspired to carry out my ‘duties’ in this report.

 

My final thoughts on the Progress television has made since “Lassie” was on.

You are invited to ‘debate’ these comments, too. I love a good and lively discussion!

 

I personally feel current shows embrace more ethnicities, culture and show characters

with wider world views in our programming. They encompasses much more ‘diversity’

on television since my childhood days. This means the people who are represented

are not stereotyped as much, anymore.

 

I like that there are two children with special needs included in some popular shows.

I recommend, “Parenthood,” and if you have never seen this, start by watching the

first shows. It is cool to watch this fine young actor, “grow up” with two caring

‘parents’ who disagree about how to handle him, along with a supportive ‘family.’

I am not sure how they would ‘label’ the character, “Brick,” in the show “The Middle,”

but the family accepts him just as he is.

I feel the shows today give better examples of the way families really act, showing

varied relationships, how to handle or not able handle serious and controversial

subjects such as addictions, challenges and sexual orientations.

 

We have heroes and villains. The same as in the past, sometimes more graphically

(and honestly presented.)

 

World conflicts and images are horrifying.  We cannot ignore what is going on, bury

our head in the sand. Powerful, and yet maddening, events are daily depicted (some

consider, ‘bombarded’) on our television sets.

We are urged to ‘act’ and ‘choose’ which side of the dilemmas we will take, as a nation

and other countries must, too.

Along with this serious, somewhat negative impact of television’s immediacy to

situations, we have positives.

We have the opportunity to watch the Olympics, sporting events and international

specials, shown across the world. My coworkers and friends from the Philippines

were captivated by Pope Francis being chosen to be the Roman Catholic Pope.

Other friends were entranced by the wedding of Prince Charles to Diana. Then,

many followed the tragic ending to Lady Diana’s life. They were hopeful for the

more recent wedding of Prince William to Kate Middleton. The baby’s birth and

now, the next one on its way, are subjects that many feel are happy bits of news.

 

History, social studies, geography and science are subjects of programs, for

everyone to  learn about, grow to enjoy and get more educated. There are so

many fascinating shows to watch. Nature, musical and art works may never be viewed

or listened to, first hand. Other countries and animals, places that may not be within

everyone’s budget or ability to travel.

 

Some people are not necessarily able to buy or read the newspaper. They find out

information about the world they live in, from the television news shows.

Hurray For National Geographic, Travel Channel, PBS, Weather Channel and

other quality network programming!

 

We have real and make-believe images still, with our magic carpet rides taking off,

from our own homes.

 

There are subjects and shows I may never care to watch. I embrace and support

those who like QVC shopping, cooking shows, reality shows and true dramas,

because they are part of the wide community of television watchers.

 

Many of the shows I choose to watch, you may not want to watch. I got hooked on a

soap opera, during our second break at work. For the past six years, I am ‘guilty’ of

watching, “The Bold and the Beautiful.”

All the years I stayed home and babysat, I did not watch any soap operas. I did in

college, much to the chagrin of my parents, when I mentioned I was scheduling my

courses around a couple of soap operas!

 

I was listening, the first year of American Idol, to all the animated conversations in

the teachers’ break room. They were talking about the ‘bad’ try-outs and the odd

characters. It was in the very beginning of the national search for those who would

make it to “Hollywood.” This caught my attention and I am so glad that I started

watching it.  I can say, “I remember when I first heard Carrie Underwood’s fantastic

voice, was medium built and had frizzy hair!” Along with several well-known singers

who made it to the Top Ten or higher.

 

I am grateful that I don’t have to sit on a sofa and listen to radio to imagine the

great radio characters of the “Green Hornet,” “Gracie Allen and George Burns,”

or how the President of the United States looks like as he is speaking. I enjoy

hearing my Mom’s excitement when she heard about Amelia Earhart’s trans-

Atlantic plane trip and her memories of the “Fireside Chats,” with President

Roosevelt, though.

 

I liked how we  used to watch to find out if we had school on Snow Days. Later,

if our children or grandchildren have school cancelled. I enjoy watching to see

how ‘my’ candidates or ‘my’ issues are doing, as the voting polls report in their

results.

 

I am saddened that there are blind people who cannot see, but grateful for the

inventions of special devices and increased equipment due to new technology

allowing them ‘to see’ the shows. The descriptions of the setting, characters and

other visual ‘clues’ are given. I have read about these and think the inventors are

brilliant for creating and providing this service. There are new creations in hearing-

impaired equipment, too.

 

Many people cannot afford to go to the movies or take a vacation with their families.

They may not go to Broadway but on PBS, they can see a Broadway play or musical.

They get their main form of entertainment from television.

 

There are others, lying on their back sometimes, healing from surgery or permanent

disabilities. My Dad liked to watch the comedies, while getting his chemo treatments.

Laughing made him feel so much better on those days he was nauseous.

 

The elderly in the nursing home I worked at for 4 1/2 years, liked to watch the shows

on TV Land, old reruns of “Lawrence Welk” and  “Bonanza,” along with their church

programming on Sunday mornings. The beauty of fireworks in our country and

celebrations around the world, brought big smiles to their faces. They enjoyed, as

I still do, the lovely creations in the Tournament of Roses Parade.

 

We get a sense of conscience from our ‘small screens.’  The night I watched, “Stand

Up 2 Cancer” impacted me, along with millions of other people watching. It moved

us to donate to some form of Cancer (Society) fund-raising, including Hospice Care,

research and local hospitals.

 

Remember “One Small Step for Mankind?” We now look forward to continued

space travel, inventions and research. When we hear of satellites making it to

Mars or other planets this gives us information that we may use in the future.

 

A quote about freedom from H.L. Mencken, American author and journalist

(1880-1956):

“We must be willing to pay a price for freedom,

for no price that is ever  asked for it,

is half the cost of doing without it.”

 

My soap box, put away for now. . .

 

 

 

What do you watch?

Have you heard about any new t.v. show compelling you

to ‘set your DVR’?

 

“Be still, my heart”

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Stop, breathe and exhale! I am almost ‘breathless’ in anticipation…

for the new Pierce Brosnan movie to come out: “The November Man.”

I can say that he is happily married, so I won’t try to be too silly about

my ‘crush’ on him. I never would dream of trying to take away a happily

married man.  Nor could I! Since his wife Keely Shaye Smith is simply

gorgeous!

She has been his wife for over 13 years, the mother of his two younger

daughters. They live on a tropical island in Hawaii. Their life style is

what he considers a calm, simple life. He claims that he and his family

are content to just bask in the sun, swim, boat and lead their ‘out of

the limelight’ life.

I believe him. He and his wife are rarely seen, except during Academy

Award shows and other special events.

They don’t seem like ‘party-goers.’ It makes him even more special

to me! Also, additionally positive about this couple, Keely and Pierce,

is that they are environmentalists, supporting many causes for the

natural world.

 

Oh, and that expression, Be still, my heart!” comes from a shortening

of a phrase, in some resources. The original one was, “Oh, be still,

my beating heart.” This was from Victorian days, where a person

may be describing or thinking of someone who took their breath

away or made them, “swoon.” It also can be traced back as early as

when Virgil in 1697:

“When from the Goal they start,

The youthful Charioteers with beating heart,

Rush to the race.”

Sting (the musician) wrote a song, “Be Still My Beating Heart,” and

gives Shakespeare credit, but not sure of the source. One source,

gives a passage from “The Tempest.”

 

I don’t talk about my birthday very often, and don’t mention it on

my blog, as in ‘today is my birthday (it’s not!)’ But this man, Pierce,

who has my Scorpio birth month’s name in the title of his next movie,

is simply, extraordinary.

Since he hit the scene of television, on “Remington Steele,” he has

been in my vision and dreams. No offense, ex-boyfriends and

ex-husbands!

I would like to share some facts that I have acquired from a few

sources. No, I have not been stalking him!

Pierce is over 60, he looks like 45 or 46, tops. His birthday is May 16,

1953. He is a wee bit older, by only 2 years, than I am. He is a Taurus,

which is compatible with my sign. How do I know? Well, there was a

period of time, where he was a widower with three boys. I was a

single mother with two girls and a boy, at around the same time.

Back to some of his childhood experiences. Pierce admits to being

teased as a child. He was raised by a single mother who took him

from his birthplace. He was born and lived a short time, along the

River Boyne, in Ireland. His father left his mother and him when

Pierce was only 2 years old. It was tough on his mother, since the

Catholic Church ‘shamed her’ due to her divorce. She chose to move

to where her parents lived, in England.

Once there, Pierce was called all the mean words for Irish immigrants,

“Mick, “Paddy” and later, “Irish.” If you can find a photograph of him

while a young child, you will see a sweet boy who was a little more

husky than his present lean self, displays now. His mother was taking

nursing classes, quite busy and unable to afford child care. So, she

chose to leave him full time with his grandparents.

Pierce’s first love was for drawing and painting. He loves art still and

continues to practice painting in the back yard of his island home. He

wanted to be a graphic artist, his dream and ‘escape’ from some of the

name-calling and torments of his childhood.

Once Pierce entered high school, he was drawn to the drama department,

where the theatre students embraced him. It was such a wonderful, new

experience. A ‘change’ from being an ‘outsider,’ helping him to become

more confident. He left ‘comprehensive school at age 16, ‘ still seeking

education in the field of commercial illustrations.’ Once he determined

there were other options, he did change his interests back to what he had

followed in high school. Pierce studied acting at the London Drama Centre

for three years after his stint with drawing.

Interestingly enough, in an interview on CBS Sunday Morning, (8/10/14),

mentioned his first movie he ever saw was James Bond’s “Goldfinger.”

It was a thrill for him to see the character of ‘007’ played by Sean Connery.

It also was a fortuitous, possibly foreshadowing, event of his life.

Pierce had his ‘first call’ after drama school for the movie, “The Long Blue

Friday.”

Try-outs for the casting of this movie, meant they suggested for the male

leading role to bring a bathing suit. He jokingly says in his interview, that

he showed up in a Speedo and got the part. He played a killer/assassin and

this role made an impact on the studios.

Another interesting fact is that his first wife, Cassandra Harris, was in a

Bond movie, with Roger Moore cast as ‘007.’ They had three sons together,

along with her daughter. They shared acting as one of their interests, as well

as their desire to keep their personal lives out of the tabloids. Unfortunately,

Cassandra developed cancer, dying at the age of 43.  Another sad event in his

life years later, his close step-daughter, who he had raised with Cassandra,

died also of  cancer, at age 42. It was hard on Pierce, reliving the tragedy of

the loss of his wife and then, later someone he considered to be, his oldest

daughter.

It took many years for Pierce to get through the stages of grief. I think this

is why he seem devoted and grateful for his present wife, Keely and their

serene family life.

As part of a spy agency, with the assisting role that Stephanie Zimbalist

played, Pierce Brosnan came into our homes, as”Remington Steele.” The

television series lasted from April, 1982 until October, 1987. This was a

form of escapism, since my first child was born in 1980 and my last one

was in 1985. Television, once the children were asleep, kept me engrossed

in the interesting plot twists and guest stars.

Pierce became a popular name and more familiar to all audiences. This

role of being the suave and debonair spy, led directly to his being cast

as ‘007’ in his first role as James Bond. Along the way, he was cast as

a thief, in the remake of “The Thomas Crowne Affair.” The original

characters were played by Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway.

One of the many humble comments that Pierce Brosnan mentions in

CBS Sunday television interview was that he is ‘grateful’ and is filled

with ‘gratitude’ for his wife and family, his mother, grandparents and

being cast as the famous character that Ian Fleming created. He was

in four popular James Bond movies.

He also mentioned that his life has been ‘easier, more relaxed’ since

he met Keelley. He has acting in his ‘blood,’ always thinking about

the next movie, whether he may produce or direct it, too. A man of

many talents, who has still the quiet presence of a kind man.

The most ‘fun’ movie I ever saw Pierce Brosnan in was “Mama Mia!”

I enjoyed the singing, the way the plot twists went, with Meryl Streep

playing a woman who could potentially have three prospects for

her daughter’s father. The daughter invites, without informing her

mother, all three of the men to her wedding!

Which man of three is her father? I’ll never tell!

It has ABBA music throughout, lots of atmosphere on a beautiful

Greek island, with the sweet voice of Amanda Seyfried. There is also

the British actor, Colin Firth, as one of the potential fathers. The

third possible choice is played by Stellan Skarsgard. Seeing Pierce

Brosnan belt out, “S.O.S” with Meryl Streep filled me with an

inexplicable joy.

Pierce mentioned in the CBS interview, that his two younger

daughters got ‘sick’ of him singing it everywhere he went, trying

to practice while listening to his Ipod with ear buds in. If you

just want to enjoy a carefree, musical movie, this will be one of

your favorites, trust me on this!

Another lighter movie that Pierce made was, “Mrs. Doubtfire,”

with Sally Fields and Robin Williams; now 22 years ago. He

has posted recently and spoken about who he considered the

great and close friend’s death. I enjoyed seeing Pierce Brosnan

“lose” in the movie, to Robin Williams, in the battle for Love.

If you ever want to see a unique plot and interesting character,

check out Pierce Brosnan in the film, “The Tailor of Panama.” He

is a tailor who is asked to be a British spy, based on the novel by

John Le Carre. The other actors in this movie, Jamie Lee Curtis

and Geoffrey Rush are fascinating in their roles. I have watched

this film more than once, high praise indeed!

Coming Soon! . . .

“The November Man.”

Is it your kind of movie?

Will you watch it at the movie theater, rent it or skip it?

April’s Variables

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April is a month that is one that makes me smile. It

is associated, right from the beginning, with FUN!

I mean, don’t you remember all the silly pranks done

in the name of “April Fool!” Also, since this year,

Easter lands within April, we get the double extra-

cute items that make it an adorable month. Baby lambs,

chicks, ducks, baskets, colored eggs, chocolates and

other brightly colored images come to mind, when I

think of April!

Here is a cheerful quotation from Brazilian theologian,

philosopher and poet, Rubem A. Alves:

“Hope is hearing the melody of the Future.

Faith is to dance to it.”

Springtime melodies ring in renewal and hope.

APRIL CALENDAR

Birthstone: Diamond

Flower: Sweet Pea

1- April Fool’s Day

2- National Walking Day

Did you know that 3 walks weekly after 3 meals

are better than a once a week 45 minute walk?

A fifteen minute walk after dinner, can lower

blood sugar for hours. Along that same line of

thinking, it will significantly lower or reduce

the risk of diabetes.

April 6-13 National Volunteer Week

7- First Quarter Moon

On 4/13/64, Sidney Poitier won the Academy Award,

making this a historical event, as he was the first

African American male, to win. He won for his role

as “Homer Smith,” in “Lilies of the Field.”

April 13- Palm Sunday

I remember going to church and the wonderful song,

which includes the words, “Hosanna” in it. There

would be a parade of people, in one church the

children, in another the choir, all carrying big

palm leaves. In Sunday School, we learned how to

make them into crosses and also, to braid them.

If you wish to know more, you may look farther

into the subject online.

15- Don’t forget to file your Federal taxes,

if you live in the United States.

On this evening, look out to see the Full Pink Moon!

This also is the first day of Passover.

18- Good Friday

This is celebrated by many Christians, including Roman

Catholics and Orthodox Catholics. Some may commemorate

Jesus’ Last Supper, in some religions.

20- Easter

If you celebrate, enjoy the family, loved ones and

neighbors. Hope there is an Easter basket and egg

hunt, along with some fun activities. Do you color

eggs with vinegar and dyes? I like that acidic,

pungent scent. It leads me to memories and nostalgic

moments, along with present days with grandchildren

getting excited about these simple crafts and use

of crayons to make the dye show patterns.

My daughter in law makes the best deviled eggs

while my son makes the juiciest ham, with the

pineapple, brown sugar and clove combination recipe

that my Mom showed me how to make. My daughter bakes

a yellow cake with marshmallow crème frosting and

coconut sprinkles with jelly beans. I used to like

the lamb or bunny cakes my Mom brought home from

the bakery.

If you have a special tradition or recipe to share,

please feel free to place these in the comments’

section!

22- Earth Day

Anywhere you live, internationally we all celebrate

Earth Day. In the schools around here, they will

sometimes go out on hikes to look for nature. In

the parks, sometimes a mayor or official will dig

a hole to place a new tree to celebrate our love

for nature. Other placees, recycling projects may

ensue, cleaning up creeks and paths where paper gets

picked up, along with the mess from winter’s winds.

Also, on April 22, the last Quarter Moon will be out.

23- Administration or Professionals Day

I have an older calendar, where Secretaries’ Day is

mentioned. I used to give the women in our Principal’s

office, little pots of violets in appreciation for

all they put up with from the students and teachers.

25- Arbor Day

This may be an even better time to schedule digging

a hole to place a new tree! I like to have little

seedlings to give to homeowners. I, also, have had

someone buy miniature trees to give to friends.

29- New Moon, it will be dark tonight!

The Paralyzed Veterans of America consider the month

of April to be Veterans’ Awareness Month. Check out

your community and see if there are any ways that

are planned to help Paralyzed Vets or if there are

any ceremonies or projects. This month is to help

raise public awareness of the unique challenges

that paralyzed veterans face on a daily basis.

I like to end with a couple of positive quotes from

Thomas Kinkade:

“True simplicity begins when you learn to enjoy the

amazing abundance of what is already yours.”

“No one can decide how you spend your time, but you.”