Category Archives: roots of language

Everything’s Coming Up Roses

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When things are going well, you may have heard and used the expression,

“Everything’s coming up roses.” Right? As I wished to look up the history of

this expression, I found out from Google “Search Engine,” that the more

frequently used slang expression is, “Everything’s coming up Milhouse.”

Did you know this? Where in the world did this one come from? It came

from the animated, long-lasting television show, “The Simpsons.” There

is a positive character who is always thinking life is just ‘swell’ and his name

is Milhouse.

Why isn’t the song, “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” at the top of the list of

expressions? This was Ethel Merman’s song from the 1959 musical, “Gypsy.”

The musical play was loosely based on the life of Gypsy Rose Lee. When asked,

my oldest daughter calls this guy, “Milhouse,” a “Goober-head.” Also, she

pointed out that the first choice of things is based on searches, while the movie

and song may have been popular, more people are familiar with the Simpsons.

 

I ask my oldest daughter why is “Milhouse” a “Goober head?” As soon as she

starts to explain what a goober head is, I think of the character named “Goober”

from the television show, “The Andy Griffith Show.” Where did this slang ‘word

set’ really come from? In my mind and memory, my  first impression evokes the

character, “Goober,” who was a goofy character.

 

She says it does not have anything to do with the historic and iconic show. It also

doesn’t have anything to do with the chocolate covered peanuts, also known as,

“Goobers.” Two generations try to figure out where the expression, “Goober-head”

came from. Did it just evolve from the Andy G. show or is it entirely “new” as the

weird expression, bringing up this Milhouse, is to me?

 

A person you call a “goober” is a “kindhearted, slightly oblivious person” who

also is considered a “lovable goofball.” An example of a “goober head” is “one

who puts an empty carton of milk into the refrigerator.” I thought this was a

teenager!

(This may be found online in the “Urban Dictionary.”)

 

There is no reference to “Goober” Pyle, who is from the show, “The Andy Griffith

Show,” if you look “goober head” up. But when you type the word in to look up

“Goober,” you will find out more about him. Goober was played by the actor,

George Lindsey who read for the part of Gomer Pyle, but was instead chosen to

play the less featured character, Gomer’s cousin. I always liked both Jim Nabors

who was chosen to play Gomer. Did you know both of these likeable and humorous

character actors came from the state of Alabama? Jim Nabors sang on variety shows

and albums, too.

 

N0w, off on another ‘wild goose chase,’ where one strand of thought or while using

one internet pathway takes you off to discover that peanuts are indeed called,

‘goobers.’ Along with these extra facts explaining there is a song about “goober

peas”‘ and another called, “goober grapes.”

This helps you to finally understand why there are two kinds of jars of mixed

peanut butter and jelly made by Smucker’s. They are called, “Goober Jelly.”

Each one features peanut butter and either strawberry or grape jelly contained

within its own jar creating ‘stripes of flavors.’  My own personal taste trial of the

Smucker’s brand of vertically layered PB & J, determined the texture of peanut

butter is kind of mushy and not as tasty as if made from separate jars. I happen

to like the crunchy peanut butter jars, anyway.

 

So, for a brief fun chase, we went from my heading off to write about roses, since

I really do like to ‘stop and smell the roses,’ outside the Sara Moore Nursing Home

and also the rose bushes by the Lutheran Church, while walking to the library.

 

Then, spontaneously writing out the old 1959 title of the song whose lyrics were

written by Stephen Sondheim for my post’s title. I needed to look the song up to

verify its history and origin, finding it was written in collaboration with Jules Styne,

who wrote the  music for “Everything’s Coming Up Roses.”

 

The most disconcerting part of all this ‘research’ was you cannot be totally

reassured that the song or the expression came first.

Also, while typing “Everything’s coming up…” another way to finish this

expression goes,  “Like a rosy garden.”

Hmmm….

 

Have I lost you yet? I had to reread this, changing it a bit just to prevent

my own self from getting totally lost!

 

By the way, the internet location called, “The Free Dictionary,” gives this

definition of the words, “everything’s coming up roses,” as an ‘idiom’ that

means “someone is having a successful career or day.”

 

I like my world sometimes to be viewed through rose-colored glasses,

while listening to some old songs like,

1. “My Wild Irish Rose” was written in 1899 by Chancellor Olcott for a musical

production. The version I am more familiar with is from the 1947 movie with

the title, “My Wild Irish Rose.” We used to sing this in school and my Mom

loves it so, since her name is “Rosalie.” It is a sentimental song and can also

be heard in a Celtic version that is so sweetly sung.

 

2. “A Rose and a Baby Ruth,” sung by George Hamilton, IV (1956).

3. “Sweet Kentucky Rose,” sung by Kitty Kallen (1955).

4. “Two Dozen Roses,” sung by the group, “Shenandoah.”

5. “The Yellow Rose of Texas,” sung by Johnny Desmond (1955).

6. “Roses Are Red, My Love,” written and sung by Jim Reeves became

most popular in the Bobby Vinton version of this song, (1962).

 

 

Newer songs,

1. “The Rose,” sung by Bette Midler is fantastic as a duet with Ashley Judd.

“The Rose” was both a movie and a song, 1992.

 

2. “Bed of Roses,” sung by Bon Jovi, (1993).

3. “Cracklin’ Rosie,” sung by Neil Diamond, (1971).

 

 

 

Hope you have a rosy week and keep your outlo0k rosy, too.

“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” comes from Shakespeare’s

play, “Romeo and Juliet.” It is discussing the two families names, who are

sworn enemies, along with the two young people who are star-crossed lovers.

 

Tomorrow, more about roses and no sidetracking on the internet!

 

Hope you have a “rosy” week!

Try to keep your outlook, “rosy” and maybe, everything will come up roses for you!

 

Spots Make Me Dotty

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I was looking for my favorite umbrella, which is black, with little spots all the same

size, in all kinds of colors. I loved that it had an overall bright look to it, along with

the main color of black mellowing it out. I felt dressy and fashionable with it, never

‘gaudy,’ despite its colorful polka dots of lavender, bright pink, turquoise, yellow, lime

green and orange. I retraced my steps and while doing this small town tour, popping

into the library to check its lost and found, stopping at the coffee shop on the corner,

going into the gas station, where I sometimes set my umbrella down to open one of

the refrigerator cases. Finally, going up the stairs of my apartment to ask the manager

if anyone had turned it in. I started thinking of the dozens, no more than that! Lots of

ways we use spots and dots in our everyday lives.

 

So, let me get us started. . .

When you get into a ‘jam,’ you are in a ‘spot.’  If it is a financial ‘spot’ you are in, you

may ask someone to ‘spot’ you some money. You may even ask a friend, “Can you loan

me a ‘spot’ of cash?”

 

Mom mentioned, as I was telling her about my lost spotted umbrella, over the phone,

“Stars are mere dots in the sky.”

I asked her if she remembered my old Reader book about Jane and Dick, didn’t they

have a dog named, “Spot?”

She replied, “Since Spot is one of the most common names (in the U.S.) to give a dog,

it may have been named, ‘Spot.’ I don’t remember.”

Do you?

 

It made me smile when she reminded me to tell my ‘blogging friends,’ that my brother’s

spotted Dalmatian was named, “Galaxy.”  When he wanted her to come, he would say,

“Come on, Gal.”

Wordplay is always something our family enjoys.

 

The children’s animated film, “101 Dalmatians” really had a lot of ‘spots’ in it.

Do you like spots on dogs?

 

Did you ever see ‘spots?’ Did this experience cause you to faint?

 

Many times, when thinking about food, you may imagine spots to be ‘bad,’ as when a

banana has ‘brown spots’ or an apple has ‘soft spots.’ Those darn mushy fruits make you

dislike ‘spots.’ I have a ‘soft spot’ for pineapple, which while choosing it, you do wish

the outer layer of green with brown triangles, to ‘give’ a little, showing it to be soft and

sweet inside, along with being ripe.

 

When I think of a positive way of thinking about ‘spots’ I change it to ‘dots’ and I do like

those chewy candy “Dots.” I also like the dark chocolate saucer-shaped candy with white

sprinkles on them which are called, “Nonpareils.” I used to buy a strip of white paper with

different pastel colored ‘spots’ or dots, made of sugar for pennies.

 

When I think of an ice cream with spots,

I think of chocolate chips or nuts sprinkled on it. One of my youngest daughter’s favorite

ice creams is Graeter’s Raspberry Chocolate Chip ice cream. My younger brother, Rich, just

tried and enjoyed “Blue Moo Cookie Dough Ice Cream” at UDF.  “Spots” placed on vanilla

ice cream in a cone become “eyes” in some children’s minds. Have you ever eaten

an ice cream cone with “eyes” on it? I used to order these for my children at Friendly’s

and also, our local Dairy Depot or Dairy Point with my ‘grandies.’

 

My favorite dress of all time, was one my Mom hand sewed. With its fabric being

called, Dotted Swiss, it was a light peach color. Those white soft, tufted spots

made me feel quite happy wearing and looking at it. The texture was one which

enticed me to smooth it down, running my hand across the surface, while sitting

in church.

 

When you have a ‘blemished record,’ you may have a spotty record.

(But you also could have a ‘checkered’ past.)

 

The positive thing about having those raised acne ‘spots’ or ‘zits’ as a teenager is,

you may have nice moist skin now, which appears young for your age.

 

Another set of ‘spots’ on your face, while we were growing up, would cause some

alarm, since it could be measles.

 

“X” marks the Spot, which is what is one of the best parts of a Treasure Map.

Have you played this with your children or grandchildren?

 

While driving in your car, you need to remember to check your blind ‘spots.’

 

Other ‘down’ sides of spots are when you have used the wrong dishwasher

detergent and your beautiful pieces crystal has ‘spots’ on them. The labels

to almost all of these products claim to produce “Spot-Free” dishes, silverware

and glasses.

 

In games, spots are often featured. There are ‘spots’ of white on black Dominoes.

The double colored spots in Candy Land, mean you get to travel past two of those

colored spots. You must beware, there is a sticky spot on the game board, too.

 

The saying, “Leopards never change their spots,” generally means that people

are also not likely to change.

 

In Art,  a technique of painting spots or dots next to each other, making it look

from a distance like they are connected is called, “Pointillism.” George Seurat made

this a famous way of painting, along with  Paul Signac. (Late nineteenth century.)

The style of making spots on canvas is a branch off the larger art category or genre

labeled,  “Impressionism.” When I was teaching Language Arts in middle school,

there was a fantastic, creative art teacher who connected art with music. She played

the Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, where it goes “Da da da daaah!” Those pounding

notes on the piano, brought the children to make dabbing splashes of spots on

their paper in art class to create their own pointillism examples. I enjoyed hanging

these up along the hallway, leading up tomy class for parents’ Open House Night.

These turned out awesome, as was the period she had paired sunflowers of Van Gogh

with the music of Electric Light Orchestra.

 

You may get into some ‘tight spots.’

Hope they are as fun as getting into a crowded VW or an old phone booth with your

boy or girlfriend.

 

Freckles look like the cutest ‘spots’ ever on the faces of red-haired children.

 

Young animals often have faint spots, like the robin on the white feathers under

the beak. The fawn, like Bambi, has white soft spots on their coats.

 

In England, at a British tea party, you might hear someone ask you,

“Would you like a ‘spot’ of tea?”

 

When you think of Lawrence Welk, do you think of polka dots?

 

When someone cooks a great country dinner with all the fixings,

you may exclaim, “This dinner really hit the ‘spot!'”

 

On a stage, there are certain “spots” that actors stand on, so the

lime lights will light them, while they deliver their lines. A director

may yell, ‘Everyone get on their spots!”

 

In marching band, you march to create patterns and it is very important

to ‘stay in formation.’ The band director may also yell, “Everyone get on

your spots.”

 

When I think of iconic “spots” I think of Lucy with a black and white

spotted skirt and Minnie Mouse, with her red and white spotted skirt.

 

When you think of a sore “spot,” you may picture your muscles or a canker

sore on your mouth. But, you also may think that someone talking about

a particular subject is rubbing a ‘sore’ or ‘touchy’ spot.

 

 

 

The Ink Spots may entertain you with one or all of these

songs:

“If I Didn’t Care”

“I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire”

“I’m Making Believe” (with Ella Fitzgerald)

“Into Each Life, Some Rain Must Fall” (with Ella Fitzgerald)

“The Gypsy” their # 1 song.

By the way, they were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of

Fame in 1989.

 

What tight or tough “spots” have you been in during your life?

For fun, what is a spot you like to head to on vacation?

Or please give us another example of the word, “spot.”

 

Finally, did I make you slightly ‘dotty’ over the usage of the word, “spot?”

Would you mind sharing about the bright “spots” in your life?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are We Okay?

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While watching the movie, “Silver Linings Playlist,” I

noticed that the character that Bradley Cooper plays,

enjoys analyzing where words come from. I also like to

look up words, find out variations of definitions and

usages of words. The idea of investigating the ‘roots of

languages’ is another way I feel I am ‘playing detective.’

When the slightly crazy character, that Bradley Cooper

plays, asks about the word, “okay.” He finds out from

Jennifer Lawrence’s wacky character that “o.k” comes from

the period in history when President Martin Van Buren

was president.

Van Buren’s presidency lasted from 1837-1841. He was a

member of the “Old Kinderhook Club.” President Van Buren

and people who originated from Kinderhook, New York, may

have considered and weighed people’s ‘value’ as they met.

Thus, if newcomers were ‘good enough’ to join their “O. K.

Club,” they were “O.K.”

It was also easier to say, “Vote for OK,” while referring

to Martin Van Buren.

I thought this was rather interesting, finding out from

a movie, how a word came about. But, when I went to look

this particular word up, I found a whole different story!

It is a much more complicated and rather bizarre,

convoluted ‘story’ that several sources used. So, here

goes another way to find the roots and history of the

simple expressions, “Okay” or “o.k.”

In the late 1830’s, Boston newspapers’ articles were full

of abbreviations. Some made ‘sense’ and others needed a big

leap of understanding or a stretch of your imagination!

Apparently there was a ‘fashion,’ or ‘fad,’ that included

this use of ‘shortcuts.’ The craze went so far as to

produce abbreviations of misspelled words. The way that

the words became misspelled, seems to be rooted in another

language entirely. These ‘old fashioned’ expressions from

everyday usage evolved into different combinations of

letters with a kind of acronym style.

Let’s see how this goes…

Such ‘popular’ at the time expressions were:

“No go” = N.B.

“All right” = A.R.

“Know go” = K.G.

“Oll wright” = O.W.

and finally, the one you all wished to know why we got this

abbreviation:

“Oll correct” = O.K.

Several of these abbreviations with seemingly nonsensical

misspellings became popular while speaking, not just in

the paper! Can you imagine saying the following?

“That lesson was a K.G.” (Know go.)

“Our plans for going to the movies are a N.G.” (No go.)

The most widespread of this fun speaking trend, was the

use of “okay” or “O.K.”

The Boston Morning Post newspaper got the credit for the

‘first’ use of the word, “O.K.” in 1839.

The use of ‘shortcuts’ reminded me of how I learned to

text faster on my cell phone. By using abbreviations, and

some of the common ways people encapsulate words, I felt

like I was learning a foreign language!

Let’s have some fun with wordplays using the word, “O.K”

as a verb. In this use of the word, the definition is

considered to mean, “approve” or “authorize.”

1. The architect ‘O.K.’d’ the draft for the job.

2. The supervisor ‘okayed’ the idea of a potluck.

In the present verb tense,

3. “Will you okay the document?”

There are two directions, for the same word, that

you can go with okay.

Here is a negative way to interpret the word, “okay.”

Which uses the definition of “mediocrity,” as an

adjective.

When you have eaten something that you like only

a little or really don’t want seconds…

1. The soup was okay.

If you feel the server was only “adequate” you

may say,

2. “She did an okay job.”

Now, here is a positive ‘spin’ on the word! in our

American culture, we use the word ‘okay’ to mean,

‘Way to get things done!’

You are using an enthusiastic tone in your voice, you

may even raise it up a notch, by exclaiming after a

great play in sports:

1. “Okay!”

When I am asked if I would like to go to a concert,

the ticket is being paid by my friend or date:

2. “O.K.!!!”

As an adverb, okay is also used well and has different

ways to interpret it.

While shopping in a crowded store and someone bumps

into you,

1. “I am okay,” you may respond.

When your friend arrives late to lunch and is profusely

apologetic,

2. “It is o.k., don’t worry about it.”

In an accident, while the paramedics are trying to get

your reaction,

3. “Are you okay?”

By nodding your head, you are validating that you are

okay. By shaking your head, you are showing without

words, that you aren’t doing very well.

Back in 1967, Thomas A. Harris, MD. wrote a self-help book

that was called, “I’m OK, You’re Ok.” This was around for

awhile, sharing communication skills, along with the way

you can observe verbal and non-verbal communication. At

the time it was published, Harris found the idea behind

T.A., Transactional Analysis to be fascinating. The book

has gone through several republishing and remained on

the New York Times Bestseller List for two years, 1972-

1974. I could not resist including this in this essay,

since it incorporates one of the most popular uses of

the word, “OK.”

In current relationships, our newest way of finding out

if we are ‘on the same page’ or getting along is to

ask these meaningful words,

“Are we o.k.?”

Who would have thought 2 letters abbreviated could be

interpreted in so many diverse ways?

I may now wonder whether or not this essay on the usage

of the word ‘okay’ was o.k.

Your response could indicate a rather blasé reaction or

it could be a very excited one!

The M & M girls strike again!

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Makyah turned three years old on March 1st, 2014.

Her ‘scheduled party’ was negotiated between her

cousin, Micah’s #5 and a family friend’s daughter,

Hailey’s #6 birthday parties. So, she was a ‘free

bird’ flying along with her sister Marley. Both

were needing a break from home yesterday. We all

ended up having a wonderful day, evening and early

morning together.

Kyah and Marley had met my Filipino coworker’s

daughter Kridia Dawn, a few years ago, when Kyah

was only a baby. Marley and Kridia remembered

each other and were ‘fast friends’ yesterday,

while I was having a blast with the reunion of

several of my Filipino friends, May, MJ, April

and Felda.

What was the occasion? The festivities were due

to Felda and Jason’s new home and they were

throwing a housewarming party! I brought a whole

wheat flour spice cake with cream cheese frosting

(which unfortunately turned out dry… wishing I

had some bourbon or other alcohol to moisten it

since I have leftover cake! This used to be my

Mom’s ‘excuse’ to add alcohol to cake that came

out dry!)

They had picked up some of a local barbecue

restaurant named, “Dickey’s Barbecue Pit,”

and had macaroni and cheese, rolls, cole slaw,

shredded beef, and varied sauces to put on the

meat. Then, there were two different Filipino

dishes, both delicious. One is more pungent and

spicy flavored with shrimp, beef, chicken and

vegetables and what Felda called, “Americanized

pancit palabok.”

There were other desserts and other side dishes,

too. This reminds me of other cultural parties I

have attended, where Italians or Germans are

very friendly, encouraging you to, “Try this, you

will like this dish!”

I had bought a ‘Welcome to your new home’ card

and added a small gift of money enclosed. I also

felt that by bringing the girls, at least in

Felda’s point of view, expressed several times,

that Kridia was so ‘glad to have children at

the party!’

Once we had cleaned up the play room and Kridia’s

bedroom after staying three hours, talking to all

that attended we headed home to put our pajamas on.

I had chosen three movies, one they liked before,

“Ice Princess,” which was a ‘hit’ and they decided

my two twin mattresses were an ice skating rink,

along with adding some gymnastics to their original

exhibition style routines.

Now, if you don’t have children nor grandchildren,

you may have assumed that we would be all ‘uckered

out’ and heading to bed soon. No such luck! In the

case of kids that I know, they feel like they just

‘switched gears!’

We ended up watching at 9 a nice, older movie

called, “Life Size,” about a Barbie-type doll

named, “Eve” who accidentally and magically

comes to life. It has a young Lindsay Lohan,

who was quite a fantastic actress back then,

along with Tyra Banks’ playing the beautiful

doll character. I would recommend it for young

girls who will find out about Lindsay’s losing

her mother (in the movie) and her father trying

to cope with grief, both the best they can.

When we finally had seen two movies, with some

acrobatics and entertainment along the way, we

were settling down to read books.

Kyah had chosen one of the Spot books and Marley

had the “Each Peach Pear Plum” book out.

I had chosen “Jesse Bear, What Will You Wear?”

This book was written in 1986. I like the style

of illustrations, striving in my own pen and ink

drawings with watercolors to provide such great

artwork with sweet details.

The Jesse Bear book is about a boy bear which

captures his adventures on a typical day at

home with his mother bear. The author is Nancy

White Carlstrom, while the illustrator is Bruce

Degen.

In my preschool Ohio testing and reporting to

the State of Ohio (through using twice a year a

test called, “Get It, Got It, Go”) it would

measure learning in three different areas. This

is interesting to some people, that we are

testing 3-6 year olds in Alliteration, where the

pictures that begin with the same sound are matched

up by the student (which is a part of Phonics and

sounding out words), Rhyming and Picture Naming.

We found that some children lagged behind in our

classroom in the first year of testing in the two

areas of rhyming and alliteration.

In the past, my children and many children around

the world were introduced to rhyming in books, in

poems, and in an environment less dependent on

video and computer games. Sure there are ones that

are focused on these areas, but I just felt that

my classroom and now, my grandchildren needed to

hear a real live person reading with emphasis in

these areas, which can be made into a lot of fun

and humorous playful reading times, too.

A very well written series is by Dr. Seuss, or

Theodore Giesel. He was educated and studied how

to use all the sounds and also, how to incorporate

necessary pre-reading skills.

Anyway, just in case my two preschoolers this

past Sat. evening were not really hearing rhymes

so much in their daily lives, I pointed out the

easy ones in the fruit book with the Mother Goose

characters, “Each Peach Pear Plum” and the fine

repetitive rhymes in the Jesse bear book, too.

Jesse bear goes through his day by noticing things

around him. He miles and sniffs roses, catches

butterflies, plays in the sand box, and washes his

hands for lunch. There are cute bear details, like

on his baby bib, his high chair, a bear cookie jar,

and cookie cutter hanging on the wall. I think there

is a bear shaped clock, too.

I liked his enthusiasm and pointed out to the girls,

that he enjoys eating vegetables like carrots and

peas, making the celery ‘crunch,’ and sprouts in a

‘bunch.’ I asked them which words rhymed throughout

the book, too. He receives bear hugs and kisses

from his father, who came home before dinner,

while Jesse was on playing on the swing set.

In the bath, Jesse blows bubbles from a bubble pipe,

and plays with his boat. When dressed for bed, he

has those adorable pajamas with ‘feet’ and the face

of a bear on his ‘seat.’ There is carved into the

wood of his bed, a bear ‘angel.’

I will share the last page of the book, one part

that seems appropriate to close this post today.

There is a full moon shining into Jesse bear’s

room, a glow on the wall, all the stuffed toys

and other decorations illuminated in a blue-gray

light. Reminding you that each page of the book

has asked, “Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear, what will

you wear?”

“Sleep in my eyes,

And stars in the skies.

Moon on my bed,

and dreams in my head,

that’s what I’ll wear tonight.”

Have You Ever Been Framed?

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Super sleuths and detectives face the possibility that

the ones who are the accused in some murder mysteries

may actually have been “framed!”

I would like to analyze the definition of “framed.”

As an adjective, it has only two meanings in a modern

dictionary:

The first one says,

“Of a picture or similar, held in the frame.”

And the second one says,

“Of a building, having a frame of a specific material.”

Then, if you look farther, you can find the word,

“framed” being used in film and the industry. Another use

of the word can be on a computer. In photography, you

may use a bright scene at the end of the tunnel, using

the dark tunnel as a frame. Or a window or doorway can

also “frame” a picture. I have “framed” a beautiful

photograph in my collection, using an old, battered

gray doorway of a barn, looking out on a pastoral

scene.

In literature, this definition is one which we, as

writers, may utilize. You can use “framing” as a

literary device, where a secondary story or stories

are embedded in the main story. I think sometimes this

is a wonderful and very fascinating way of writing

(and reading another’s work.)

Since the period of 1895 (or around the 1900’s), the

phrase, it’s a “frame-up” first appeared. I like this

‘slang’ usage by sleuths and police detectives the best.

I am such a murder mystery fan! The primary suspect in

most murders is the spouse or a family member. This

person sometimes can be “framed.” I am sure that you

know this reference and it is a great way to throw

people ‘off the track’ of the true murderer!

In this case, when someone who is not guilty, is being

“framed,” it is being used as a noun. The meaning is a

“fraudulent incrimination of an innocent person.”

The next part of this post, is my own inventive way

of playing with both the words, “frame” and “framed!”

I did not find this somewhere else, I created this

fun way of wordplay.

There is always your “frame of mind.”

Another way of looking at things is to change

your “frame of reference.”

We have all been “framed” in photographs on our

parents’ walls, from childhood until we graduate

and ‘do them proud!’

Do you wear glasses? My “frames” are forever

getting bent, since I like to lie down while

viewing television.

I take my “frames” off, to read a book or look

at the needle to thread it, in sewing.

Children with bangs and some adults, look nice

while their face is “framed” with their hair.

When a parent or lover holds your face in his

or her hands, it is “framed” with love.

When we “framed” in the second house I ever lived

in, it was in Bretton Ridge development, North

Olmsted, Ohio. We loved collecting pop bottles

and turning them in for penny candy, at Szarka’s

Delicatessen.

This was while I was in third grade, the last

picture taken in elementary school, before my

parents invested in glasses “frames” for me.

After that, my “frames” ranged from being black

with white sparkles, cat-like in appearance,

to a crazy and bold red pair.

When I “framed” my three children in their senior

year high school photos, I chose three individually

unique picture “frames.”

My oldest daughter had an ornate cream-colored

ceramic “frame,” with her artistically posed photo

of a Roman column she is leaning against.

Carrie is wearing a black, gray and white ‘floaty’

print dress she bought at an antique dress shop,

that is no longer around Delaware. It used to be

a place to get costumes for theater productions

and it was called, “Captain Betty’s.”

Captain Betty had a huge poster with famous band

members’ signatures who had visited in Central

Ohio and chosen to stop in to purchase one of her

fantastic vintage clothing items. These ranged from

the Flapper age through the seventies. That poster,

“framed” in black, is a wonderful piece of memorabilia!

Might bring a ‘pretty penny’ to the family!

I dropped off a big box of my seventies’ clothes,

donated to her shop, for all the times she had

helped Carrie choose a special outfit for a dance

or play. (I am afraid she had been ill, possibly

passed away… My friend says only a few months

ago.)

The second senior photograph is in a rugged pine

“frame” and holds my son, James, sitting in a

large armchair, where the photographer threw a

white sheet over. He is ‘posed,’how I asked him

to sit. The photographer allowed me to “frame” him

in this chair. With his bare feet and lovely toes

I used to tickle and even, while he was a baby,

nibble on. Jamie’s pose is a natural one.

The last “frame” is a golden one. If you ever saw

my youngest daughter, Felicia, you may understand

why I chose this frame. She has golden hair, a

throw-back to my Swedish Grandpa Mattson. She was

a runner-up for Homecoming Queen, a soccer player,

a long distance runner when they benched her in

soccer, and third place winner of Cross Country

regionals.

When she was in high school they called, Felicia,

“Fox.” She was called that, as she placed a mini-

microphone into people’s faces, interviewing them

for her high school news channel. “Fox on your side.”

Then, like a different spin on that, she was using

for awhile this ‘brand’ for her blog, “Finding Your

Fox.” She has been, even at age 28, fighting and

winning her battle against her rheumatoid arthritis.

She was diagnosed at age 13, (called JRA) and we feel

it may have started at age 11.

How do you best enjoy the word, “framed?”

Have you chosen special photographs to place in

a prominent place on your walls or mantel?

How did you match the subject matter or their

occupants with the “frames” you chose?

The Beauty of Languages

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baklava (Greece layered, nut laced with honey dessert)

escargots (French for snails)

falafel (Arab specialty)

tacos, tamales (Mexican, Spanish)

sushi (Japanese raw food)

scones (British or Scottish quick bread or cake)

croissants (French pastry)

pizzelles (Italian cookies spiced with anise)

gefilte fish (Jewish fish)

Origins in different countries…

My name is Robin Elizabeth. When I was going to middle school

Spanish class, we had to choose the closest name to our own in

a list of Spanish names. I used “Roberta” for those three years,

sorry if this is your name (I have a lovely nice British girlfriend

with this name!) But I was ready for a change in high school! I

marched up to Mr. Donaldson’s desk  saying, “Senor Donaldson,

por favor, may I change my name to my middle name? It would

become ‘Isabella!'”

Well, how did this subject come up? One of Mom’s very nicest

neighbors has the first name of Isabel. I told her when I met her

that in Spanish that is “Isabella” and if it were looked up in a

translation dictionary for theEnglish version, it would be

Elizabeth. Did she know Elizabeth was a special, unfortunately

‘barren’ woman in the Bible, who is visited by an angel who

fortells that she will “bear fruit” and becomes the mother of

John the Baptist?

We talked about how foreign languages are the originators

of our English language and that our everyday vocabulary

includes a lot of foreign words or “roots” from foreign

countries. We are indeed a “melting pot” of languages,

so many different reasons why we use the words we do!

I wrote a few of the international foods that I would not

have known about nor tasted them, unless someone had

introduced them to me.

Isabel was fascinated and asked if I knew of any other “roots”

of words or where they came from? I told her the beautiful word,

“pavilion” comes from the French word pappillon, which is a

butterfly. If you notice large pavilions look a little like wings that

are spread downward.

My Grandmother Paula Hilmida Mattson used only a few German

words sprinkled into her language, but she definitely could cook

the special pastries of her country. (kuchen, spaetzle, and the

lovely combination of Spritz cookies and Pfeffernusse.

My Grandfather Walter William Mattson spoke very clear English, he

learned it quickly once he immigrated here from Sweden. Both my

mother’s parents came over as teenagers and met on a street corner

in New York City. That love story is in one of my older posts…

I think you probably recognize most foods that are from other countries.

I used to like international festivals, more so than individual ones. They

had such a “smorgasbord” of delicacies to choose from, the delicious

scents and smells intermingling as they wafted through the air.

Something new to me, recently, was an introduction to the exotic world

of bubble teas! Also known as “pearl milk tea” or “boba milk tea.” This

tea-based drink was invented in tea shops in Taichung, Taiwan in the

eighties! Wow! Took me long enough to discover their delicious and

chewy tapioca pearls and sweetly rich teas!

What have you learned recently about your heritage, any foreign foods

that you have recently been introduced to or any that are passed down

for generations? Also, are there any interesting stories attached to taking

a foreign language? Thanks for reading and hope to read about your

different beautiful languages or unique delicacies!

I

The Meaning of Regret

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Regret is such a wasted emotion, sucking the full energy

out of one’s day. I think about the really important use

of the word “regret” when it is defined as “to mourn.” This

can come in the form of  that horrible letter or telegram:

“We regret to inform you that your special person

(insert:  son, daughter, husband or other family member)

has been killed in the line of military duty.”

Even then, if you had not known the outcome of the use

of the word “regret,” you would feel the heavy pall of death

come over you.

So, why do we “regret” our actions? Do we really feel that

our mistakes are on an equal or parallel level as death?

When we give up a relationship or marriage, or the other

person does, do we have to have a sense of “regret?” Is that

necessary? If you use the term in this sense, it means “to feel

sad.”

I have been, throughout my whole life, a rather serious person

who has a lot of fun when she isn’t worrying herself to death!

Yes, there is the word, death! I think that we need to put aside

our fears, worries, concerns, and regrets, allowing JOY to enter

into our lives.

Now, I don’t mean give up on things, don’t allow your job, family

or loved ones to wander around unattended or not cared for!

I just mean, release your fears, worries, concerns and regrets over

to your higher being. Allow God or whoever you follow in your faith

to take over and then, once you are no longer fettered, try to give,

extend yourself and enjoy your life.

Instead of this “selfish” poem I once wrote about a man:

“I need my heart to heal

I opened up more to you than I ever did with

Anyone!

I felt I knew you so quickly,

Now,

Best thing…

Please let me get better in~

Silence!”

Say these repentant (last definition of  “regret”) words:

“In the stillness and silence of this

moment,

I seek You,

Please forgive me,

Please give me Your gift of Healing.

I want to know You more than any

human being,

I wish to get closer to Thee.”

This is a more sincere, thought out poem

(or make it a prayer by saying Amen.)

 

 

p.s. Why do we have such a thing as “Regrets Only”

on party invitations? Such a strange twist on the word

(again) “regret.”