Category Archives: “The Jetsons”

Connections: the past with the future

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When I heard that there were two days in a row, celebrating subjects of interest

to me, I was determined to make a ‘big stretch’ and connect the dots. The first day

is based on an animated cartoon t.v. series about the future. It was shown awhile

back, where some of the inventions and special effects have come true. The second

day is one celebrating how we separate our words, making our sentences flow by

using special symbols to separate the words. I think this form of language is swiftly

diminishing, since so many people text, rather than email. While computer emails

have replaced fashioned letters. I am hard pressed to figure out how the celebration

of the first Jetson’s animated cartoon series and the subject of punctuation go together.

 

Traveling into the future with the Jetsons. . .

 

Happy September 23rd: Celebrating the Jetsons!

 

Today, September 23, 2014 is the 52nd Anniversary of the original premiere of the

futuristic, science fictionalized cartoon with child Elroy,  dog Astro, the maid Rosie,

the teen-aged girl named Judy being raised by their parents, Jane and George Jetson.

Here are some interesting facts I found out about this cartoon television series. Did

you know the first two years of “The Jetsons” were shown during “prime time t.v.?”

During 1962 and 1963, this was shown after dinner, after the news during that coveted

time slot of “prime time.” The number of shows totaled 75 episodes and three full-length

feature films. While my children were babies, during the years of 1985-1987, additional

Jetsons cartoons were produced. They are syndicated and repeated over many years after

their original showings.

 

The cartoon series was based loosely on the family in the comic strip, “Blondie.” The father

is drawn tall, lanky and has a tyrant of a boss, named “Mr. Spacely.” Of course Dagwood

Bumstead had a cranky, short-tempered boss, too. I had not put these two together, so

there is another ‘connection,’ that will form a new impulse from one brain wave to another.

(Or one synapse to another!) The setting for the creative cartoon is an imaginary time in

the future, when there would be space vehicles from home to work, transportation, when

there woud be pollution, so there would be little outdoor activities, along with moving

sidewalks (glad we know we have those, at least) and robotic maids. (We have some

versions of automation that could resemble the work provided by Rosie.)

 

The Jetsons family lives in a place called, Skypad Apartments. Their city is called, “Orbit

City.” George’s workplace is called “Spacely’s Space Sprockets.” The apartment building

was designed to remind you of the Seattle Space Needle. There are vague references to

how one gets in and out of the atmosphere, which is supposed to have air pollution.

The people wear space helmets while transporting around the city and various other

buildings. You probably may remember George’s space vehicle turning into a brief-

case.

 

In promotional information provided for the setting and relationships in the scripts,

the ages and some of the individual interests and details are given. This is something I

was not aware of, since I don’t think we knew their ages. The plots of the shows may

have revealed many of this, but my mind was intrigued with the idea of an actual

script and characteristics given for each character.

 

By the way, “T.V. Guide’s list of the 25 Greatest Science-Fiction Legends” considers

“The Jetsons” to be one of those famous influences and includes them in the top 25.

 

George is 40 years old, while going to work he wears a suit and tie, similar to some of

our fathers representing the period that the series was shown on television. Occasionally

at home, the family wears leisure suits that resemble jogging suits with some interesting

shoulder pads.

Jane’s outfits always seem very ‘hip’ with some points on her cuffs and shoulder pads.

Jane is given the age of 33 years old. She portrays an active homemaker participating in

clubs such as the Galaxy Women’s Historical Society.  Jane’s details include liking and

enjoying artwork. Her favorite artists are “Leonardo de Venus” and “Picasso Pia.”  Judy

is a ‘typical’ depiction of a teenager of 15 years old. She attends Orbit High School,  likes

to shop, likes talking about clothes and is often on her telephone. There is a cool futuristic

‘digital’ diary she has; which reminds me of today’s cell phones and computers. Elroy

attends Little Dipper School. He is 6 1/2 years old and is studying some serious subjects.

He studies Space History, Astrophysics and Star Geometry. He enjoys playing with his dog,

Astro, who talks without his “r” sound.

Later during the 80’s additional series, there was an interesting creation of an alien, who

is named, “Orbitty.” Elroy’s playmate has spring-like legs since there were some robotics

involved in this guy who changes colors with his moods.

 

 

 

Moving on, possibly the way the world revolves. . .

to September 24, 2014.

 

Traveling into the distant past. . .

when punctuation was important to use. . .

 

This is the Tenth Anniversary of one of my personal favorite subjects:

Happy National Punctuation Day!

 

There is a man who was concerned about our nation’s ability to spell,

use proper grammar and punctuation. His name is Jeff Rubin. He has

had for some time, wanted people to let him know when they hear of

punctuation errors in their every day lives. He also wishes that the various

spokemen and women, along with newscasters, would be more aware of

their correct usage of these.

On 9/24/04, the first annual National Punctuation Day came about!

There is still an ongoing debate whether or not, Punctuation and even,

Spelling are current and relevant. Currently, with texting, few uses of

full sentences and other forms of communication, using ‘short-cuts,’

slang and abbreviations it may seem to be a ‘lost art.’ One that parents

and teachers alike, may just give up on!

 

But definitely not on September 24th!

 

Teachers usually like to be ‘sticklers’ for these since they were made to,

while young and in school. In college, there was a debate about the

Spelling book, whether lists to be memorized were worth the time and

sometimes crying children, who were just not born spellers. There are

a few natural spellers, a few natural history or social studies ‘geniuses,’

along with those who can understand all levels of mathematics, including

algebra and trigonometry. In each classroom, the strengths and weaknesses

are easily determined by testing, but sometimes figuring this out, may create

biases. We need to make all subjects of learning interesting and bring the

‘fascination’ back into each subject. Games can be played, along with other

means of making learning ‘hands on’ and more ‘experiential.’

 

One suggestion in Rubin’s request in how you may celebrate punctuation

is to get an old-fashioned newspaper and circle the punctuation forms, by

children. They may like taking a red crayon and circling all the commas, periods,

exclamation marks, colons and semi-colons. Adults may be excited to circle the

misspellings and the mistakes made in usage of punctuation.

 

I have seen misspellings in the schools listed on snow days and the political polls’

results shown below the television shows. I have heard poor grammar on t.v.

shows. It upsets me most when the newscasters use either poor grammar or

show a lack of understanding what they are reading on their teleprompter.

Mispronunciations occur across all levels of education, due to possibly lack

of using the dictionary and reading the way the words are supposed to be

pronounced.

 

The Huffington Post had a great article to celebrate this holiday last year,

9/24/13. It was called, “6 Common Punctuation Mistakes that Drive Us

Crazy.”

Here they are with no details given here, I see that I am over my 1000

words again… This article had me laughing out loud, they composed a

funny article and you must try to look it up:

“1. The misused apostrophe.

2. The ubiquitous exclamation marks.

3. The crazy comma.

4. The misplaced semi-colon.

5. The quotation marks.

6. The blurring of ‘text talk’ with real writing.”

 

 

Okay, not going into how, but  I am guilty of #s 2, 3 and 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Sunday Sillies

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I will be working on this Sunday, to “earn” my Friday off after

Thanksgiving. I am glad to be here at the library, able to post a

Sunday silly post for your enjoyment today or tomorrow. You

know, when we write daily, we assume people are reading daily

but sometimes this will be read a whole week, month or someday

in the future!

I am happy to say my Dad used to read to my brothers and me,

while we waited for my mother to get ready for church every Sunday.

My Dad used the philosophy that is echoed in a wonderful, special

song that Andy Griffith sings with Brad Paisley, “Waiting on a Woman.”

If you have not heard this, be prepared for a lovely and emotional,

sentimental song. I get teary-eyed often, when I hear it or especially,

if I watch it. My Dad is in Heaven, I believe and is “waiting on his

woman.” That will tell you the gist of the song, but it is aimed at

impatient people who want their significant other to hurry up and

get ready.

The Sunday comics that my brothers and I loved were varied. We

liked, of course, Peanuts. I have the paperback books of these close

to my heart characters and one, I look back at and cherish was the

one, where Linus is expecting his baby sister, Sally. This one is so

precious, showing Sally later in the book, being a baby! He even

shares his beloved blanket with her!

My brothers liked the ones that had action that had superheroes and

they are probably around in comic books, but like the older Peanuts

not seen so much anymore. We liked the “Sarge” cartoon, the “Wizard

of Id” and we liked the different ones that were found in the Sandusky

Register and later, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Cleveland Press,

(now defunct).

We also loved Saturday morning cartoons! I am going to announce a

wonderful surprise for my older readers!!

“Hot” assembly line:

The new Hot Wheels’ production of a Jetson’s car!

Here are the details for this 2014 edition of the line, “Tooned II” tm,

also called “HW City” tm.

The packaging says “Born in 2062 and gives the Birthplace as Orbit City.”

You may purchase this car from Advance Auto or anywhere Hot Wheels

are being sold.

“Specialty: Bubble-top Aero Sedan

with rear fin.

Undercarriage landing gear and the ability to fold itself into a handheld

suitcase.” This is called a “suitcase” on the product cardboard literature,

that holds encased vehicle. But I would say that I

remember it turning into a “briefcase” in my memories for Mr. Jetson to

carry into work.

This car is in bright neon green, has Mr. and Mrs. Jetson (“Jane” and “George”

in the front seat and their daughter, “Judy,” maid, “Rosie” and son, “Elroy” in

the back. No dog in the back! The family dog was called “Astro.”

This will tell your age if you remember it from 1062-63, when it first came out,

but it did start playing daily in 1987 onward so that your children got a chance

to imagine the high technological wonders and what they used to call, the “Space

Age!”

This “Blast from the Past” may give you extra smiles, as they did me, yesterday

while I packed them for shipments to Advance Auto stores that will be selling them!

How many of you are disappointed, as I am sometimes, that we don’t have our own

flying cars in our garages or parking lots? Or that we could have them collapse into

a portable briefcase?

What did you think, if you were a kid in the sixties, would be happening in the year

2013 and soon to be, 2014?