Category Archives: Tomi Ungerer

Imagination Gone Wild

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Monkeys and the moon are such amusing subjects for children’s books. I have

always loved, “Curious George” and his adventures. I also treasure the worn-out

copy we have of “Goodnight Moon.” There is an old classic, “Moon Man,” that has

been made into a sweet and warm video (2012.) It was beautifully animated by

German filmmakers.

 

This is based on Tomi Ungerer’s 1966 book, “Moon Man.” The author narrates the

film. If you have not read Tomi Ungerer’s books before, I would recommend, “The

Three Robbers” or “Allumette: A Fable,” to incorporate imagination and action

from a fine illustrator and author. Tomi Ungerer is famous for his ability to write

in three languages and is often quoted. There are a series of his posters with the

famous quotes available to view online.

 

Recently I have found a unique and short article that was about “Goodnight, Moon.”

I had never read Margaret Wise Brown’s biographical details and was very much

dismayed to find out that she died at the young age of 42 years old, having suffered

from a ruptured appendix. Her “Runaway Bunny,” is another all-time favorite among

my three children. I have not read it as much to my grandchildren, since it is indeed

the ‘perfect’ book to read to one’s own children. If the bunny is going to run away,

the mother rabbit will become all the things that are needed to stay by the bunny’s

side. (A sail on a boat, a flower in a garden, etc.) She passed away in 1952, having

left us with such beautiful illustrations and stories.

 

They have recently published a new collection of previously never-seen-before

lullabies written by Margaret Wise Brown called, “Goodnight Songs.” I cannot

wait to see this book, hoping to savor the eloquent words that she chooses to

use, along with hoping for more of her beautiful artwork shown in this book.

 

Did you know recently, there are numerous ‘copy cat’ books of Margaret Wise

Brown’s “Goodnight Moon?” There have been several versions of her classic tale

springing forth recently. The article I found gives this a spin by describing them as,

‘a host of imitators.’ This seems like a more polite version of what I would call

these plagiarists, stealing someone who is no longer here to ‘sue them’ over her

original theme!

 

Here are some of the amusing titles of those who have done “take-off’s” of the

“Goodnight Moon” book:

“Goodnight iPad,” where the newest technology is part of the book’s theme,

including a lot of cords in the child’s bedroom.

“Goodnight Nanny-Cam,” which is poking fun at modern parents who have

installed this to keep watch over the Nanny. One of the lines includes this,

“A bilingual nanny who was whispering hush.”)

Beyond what you would wish to have children listen to, the parody of the

book takes an adult direction in, “Goodnight Keith Moon.” Yes, there is a

line from this book going for laughs of a more seriously cynical kind:

“Goodnight rock stars, goodnight pills.” (Or is this sarcasm?)

What will they think up next?

 

Wonder if they make much money on these parodies? I am a ‘fan’ of “SNL”

parodies, but not sure how I would feel with the children’s books parodies

on my bookshelf?

What do you think?

 

There are a few adorable little clues to the 2012 children’s animated film, “Moon

Man,” I wished to share. This movie is only 95 minutes and has the man in the moon

coming to earth as a pale (moon colored gray/light blue skinned) man. He is bored up

on the moon, so he catches a ride on a comet’s tail. The imagination goes wild, with

the lovely flowers and the unique way the artwork incorporates colors. (The owl is

purple, moose is blue, and there are so many flowers the moon ‘man’ who looks

like a boy to me, needs to sniff. The commentary is subtle about humanity and will

reach your conscience about the environment and how we treat ‘aliens,’ too.)

The sad part of the book is how our President sees him as a ‘threat to our world.’ It was

released in February, 2014. It was interesting to hear Tomi Ungerer’s voice. He was

born in Strasbourg (1931) and moved to the United States in 1956, at age 25. He has

moved to Ireland, where he lives today.