Category Archives: trains

Combinations

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I think automatically of my locker in high school, when I think of ‘combinations.’

My grandkids like to mix up their sodas, at those dispensers in fast food places,

what we used to call ‘suicides.’ Now, not so appropriate of a label, not one I would

want to try to explain to the ‘grandies.’ Some hodge podge of stuff, arts, music and

strange surprise may interest you in this post.

There have been some fun things that have

come across my path, in the past week, so here goes my silly list of ‘combinations.’

 

1.  Weird Sodas, Soft Drinks or Pops:

*Did you know that Tab still exists? It is still available in supermarkets, along with

being sold in South Africa, Spain, Norway, United States and U.S. Virgin Islands.

Also, it was the number one beverage sold at the place where famous people used

to gather:  Studio 54. Did you know since 1998, Studio 54 has become the home of a

theater called, Roundabout Theater Company? It had been in another location existing

since 1965. Also, if you knew about this, did you know in the basement there still is a

place to meet friends and hope for someone to spot called, 54 Below?

 

*Jones Soda Company sells some wonderful tasting sodas. I like their fruit flavored ones,

often grape or orange reminding me of the days my Dad would bring home a wooden

crate of Cotton Club pops. Crème soda, yummy! Well, did you know Jones Soda Co.

makes a flavor called PB & Jelly?

Also, during the holidays, seriously Jones Soda has sold what they call the “Holiday

Pack” with two flavors you could not pay me to drink: Mashed Potatoes and the odd

combination of Turkey and Gravy. I would like to see the sales numbers for those two

‘sodas!’

 

*Ski Pop, which is like Surge or Mt. Dew, but some consider a ‘poor’ substitute. Here

in Ohio, some recent statistics on this brand have explained that in Vinton County,

chicken farmers give this to their chickens to drink. Huh? Can anyone explain the

purpose of this? I can just imagine those ‘hyperactive’ chickens in their yards…

 

*Dr. Brown’s Soda has a flavor called “Celery” and it sells well in New York City

delicatessens.

 

*Rocket Fizz Brand Sodas produces “Lester’s Fixin’s” with two flavors called, Ranch

Dressing and Buffalo Wings. So, thanks to Lester, you can buy both flavors and skip

the cooking…

 

*Live, fermented soda, Kombucha comes in multiple flavors, like Ginger, Lemon,

Orange, Doctor, Cola and Cucumber Cayenne. That last one may manage to cover the

stinky smell.  Sorry, I have had this homemade version of battery acid and am not sure

I will ever acquire taste for it. I was fascinated, because coincidentally, right after I read

the article about the flavored Kombucha ‘sodas,’ I saw on my most recent favorite comedy

someone who makes this. (It is a nice show, even for families, too bad it is not going to

make it.) “About A Boy” includes Minnie Driver playing a single mother character. This

episode is focusing on her neighbor’s moving away. She makes homemade kombucha

and stores it in the dumb waiter elevator that connects her apartment to the handsome

and quirky neighbor’s, who is her son’s ‘best friend.’ He opens it and accidentally tips

one of her jars of concoction over. I saw in the male actor’s face, exactly my feelings

about kombucha; Yuck!

* Placenta Soda. Gross!

* Leninade, with Lenin, the communist’s name inserted in its product brand.

*Sickenly sweet, but I still like these two flavors that are a little different: Cotton Candy

and Strawberry Watermelon Faygo soda pops.

 

 

2. Robert Landau took outstanding, definitive photographs of the famous billboards along

Sunset Strip, which were on exhibit at Capitol University, Columbus, Ohio. You may check

the iconic and historic photographs of the poster-styled billboards, along with the urban legend

that Mick Jagger ‘defaced’ his own Rolling Stones billboard. There’s a compilation book available

of  Landau’s photos found in a 2012 book of his collection. There were in ‘the day’ people who

specialized in hand painting some of these memorable, vintage billboards. The years they were

most prevalent were from 1960 – 1980. Reading about renowned L.A. photographer, Landau,

was one of the most pleasant parts of the past two weeks of ‘combinations,’ I ran into while

collecting various news items.

 

3. Sour Patch Kids’ gum, flavored orange by Stride, has an interesting inside the pack,

design. It includes a Pirate map with the fun words of:

“The taste of orange boards your tongue and storms your taste buds. Then sweetly

serenades you with a sea shanty and a little pirate-y jig.”

So creative and you may find yourself tearing apart their other flavors of Sour Patch

Kids’ gum, which also comes in ‘red’ and ‘lime.’ (Not sure what flavor ‘red’ is?)

 

4. Jeff Dunham is going to be performing in Columbus, Ohio. Just recently heard about

him while visiting someone’s blog. He is a weird ventriloquist who sometimes uses

skeletons and creepy subjects in his comedy routine. He is seven years younger than I

am which makes it unusual that he became a ventriloquist. Seems it was becoming ‘out

of fashion’ during the time he was able to practice this unusual skill. Danny O’Day was

one of my brother’s ‘dummies’ and he enjoyed trying to ‘throw his voice.’ He is very

talented in his YouTube videos…

 

5. Music Trivia:

*Have you heard Lorde’s song, “Mockingjay?” Do you like it?

*Have you listened to Neil Diamonds’ new album titled, “Melody Road?”

Oh please, someone go with me to see my favorite (individual) musician

while he performs in Columbus, Ohio on 3/28/2015.

I can buy my own ticket, but many of my friends would prefer to spend that amount of

money on a group. Sure, I would like to hear Bob Seger, playing with the J.Geils Band,

(who I heard last in person, at the Cleveland Agora, aged 20 or so…) Or Boston or The

Manhatten Transfer, but Neil!  I really would be so excited to see him in concert…

 

*Buckey Country’s annual Superfest will include Kenny Chesney, Blake Shelton,

Rascal Flatts along with a crew of country musicians in the two day event, held

in the Ohio Stadium on June 20 and 21st, 2015. Tickets last year were around

$70 a day, my friend and coworker, Tina shared.

 

*As I was heading to my Mom’s for vacation, I said ‘goodbye’ to many people. Many

were wishing me good times with my family. Which wasironic since after clocking out

on Friday, October 24, 2014,  I turned on my car, to hearthe nostalgic strains of Simon

and Garfunkel’s song playing on the radio,

“Sitting in the railway station. …” Yep, you guessed it. … “Homeward Bound.”

 

6. Art:

* At the Wexner Center, located on Ohio State University campus,  has

a thrilling experience in store for you should you wish to see the exclusive

exhibit titled, “Transfigurations.” It is from Les Wexner’s private, limited

art collection that includes Susan Rothenberg, Willem de Kooning, Picasso,

Giacometti, and Dubuffet. You may view them through December 31st. They

are considered Modern Masters. The Picasso is a reclining woman and is quite

large and interesting. One reviewer had to go back and look at it again, it is

entrancing in its own unique perspective of a nude woman.

 

*The public domain of Frankenstein memorabilia will be on exhibit in the

Homeport Gallery, where artist and filmmaker, Celia M. Peters, shares her

collection. She has different subject matters that are also considered, public

domain, where no need to have permission to reproduce, Shakespeare,

Beethoven and Dorian Gray, for example. The horror film subject matter

seems appropriate for Halloween viewing.

 

* Open Door Art Studio will show in Grandview all kinds of multi-media Halloween

objects. This includes zombies, werewolves, witches, monsters in costumes and

masquerade attire for your interest in memorabilia.

 

 

Okay, tell me:  Which was the most bizarre part of my combinations post?

 

A quotation from Dubuffet,

“Without bread, we die of hunger.

Without art, we die of boredom.”

Dubuffet’s artwork is featured at Wexner’s special show, “Transfigurations.”

 

Rare Books

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The unique, exquisite first edition rare books collection is awe-inspiring.

This includes many books you will know and love. It includes international

books, on loan for a brief period, from September 29 until November 9, 2014.

A man named Stuart Rose, started collecting books that were special to him.

Rose’s collection began when he found in 1992, the First Edition of,

“Tarzan,”

by

Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Rose went on collecting past 2000 First Edition or

“One of a Kind” books.

There are 49 featured books,

displayed on

University of Dayton

campus,

in the

Roesch Library

First Floor

Gallery.

 

I love the title of the exhibition:

 

“Imprints

and

Impressions”

 

Part

of

the

“Milestones

in

Human Progress”

Program:

 

Highlights

from the

Rose Rare Book

Collection

 

There are directions online

you may follow to get to

the place you need to go.

 

Jane Austen’s

“Pride

and

Prejudice,”

Quote:

“The spoken word passes away, while the written word remains.”

 

Paul H. Benson,

essayist for the

Dayton UD Alum

Magazine

reminded

us of the

Essence

and

Importance

of:

Preserving books while time marches forward

some day society may feel we don’t ‘need’ them.

These are our own printed legacy and heritage.

(Not quoted, but read and digested. Explaining

and passing on my feeling of urgency to see this

magnificent book collection before it goes away.)

 

Here are some favorites of mine:

The

“Qu’ran”

Copied

in

Beautifully

Intricate

Calligraphy

by

Aziz

Khan

Kashmiri

(1864)

 

Galileo,

“Starry Messenger”

(1610)

 

Mark Twain,

“Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

(1885)

 

Isaac Newton,

(Misspelled words,

intentionally copied as

Newton

chose to do.)

“Opticks

or a Treatise

of the

Reflexions, Refractions

Inflexions and Colours

of

Light.

Also,

Two Treatises

of the

Species and Magnitude

of

Curvilinear Figures”

(1704)

 

Ralph Ellison,

“Invisible Man”

(1952)

 

Virginia Woolf,

“A Room of One’s Own”

(1929)

 

J. R. R. Tolkien,

“The Lord of the Rings”

Hand-written

Proofs,

with final edits

done in pen.

(1953 – 1955)

 

Geoffrey Chaucer,

“Canterbury Tales”

(1492)

 

Rene Descartes,

“Discourse on the Method”

(1637)

 

William Shakespeare,

“Comedies, Histories and Tragedies”

(1632)

 

Nicholas Copernicus,

“On the Revolution of Celestial Spheres”

(1543)

 

*I would love to see*

Artistic

Illustrations

drawn by

Salvador Dali,

“Alice in Wonderland”

(1969)

 

There are more books to examine and admire.

 

There is a special informative talk by former

UD graduate and famous person,

Daniel De Simone,

about the Rose exhibit on:

October 16, 2014,

7:00 – 8:30 p.m

 

Daniel De Simone is

Librarian at the

Folger Shakespeare Library,

Washington, D. C.

(Formerly worked at

Library of Congress)

Lecture topic:

“Why the Stuart Rose Book Collection

Matters in the Age of Digital Surrogates.”

 

Since I have two First Edition books that are not ‘rare’ nor very great condition,

I felt the power of words would be expressed better personally, if I told you about

my books.

“Magnificent Obsession,”

Lloyd C. Douglas

(1929)

P.F. Collier and Sons, Company

New York, New York.

The book begins with a physician given as, “Doctor Hudson.” His mental and physical

condition is described as “on the verge of a collapse,” along with “all but dead on his feet.”

We can all relate, in one way or another, to this man who is trying to be the best doctor

he can. Reminding us of that often expressed, “Physician heal thyself.”

Then comes a “twist of fate.”

I love this book, which was made into a movie. (Although, it changes some of the details,

making it a different story entirely.)

In the end of the book, another doctor is mentioned, if you were not aware of the accident

you might wonder who this character is. “Doctor Hudson” is no longer the focus. The reader

has come to know and love a different man, you see.

This story has turned from a solitary life of medicine to one where there is someone named,

“Bobby.”

He plans on boarding a train, then disembarking to go on a big steamer ship.

The love of his life, (you need to read the book to find out how he met her!)

“Mauve” approaches with what the author describes as, “a snug, saucy, cloche hat” on

her head and she is wearing, “a tailored suit of mauve that sculptures every curve of

her body.” She embraces him and the rest of the happy ending comes in his plans for

their future, where the Captain will marry them on their trip abroad.

 

My other favorite book, which my good and dear, deceased friend, Bob gave me. I have

written how I met him and our friendship grew, from playing games on a picnic table

in the park, to his watching my two grandsons playing on the gym equipment there.

This is an everlasting gift, his memory pervades into my soul, which is perfectly fitting

in the book he gave me:

“The Keys of the Kingdom”

A. J. Cronin

(1941)

Little Brown and Co.

Boston, Mass.

This is a Scottish tale, with a priest named Father Chisholm. It begins with his limping up

a steep path from St. Columbia’s Parish (church) to his home that is walled in by gardens.

He looks out on a beautiful view described by the author,

“Beneath him was the River Tweed, a great wide sweep of placid silver, tinted by the low

saffron smudge of Autumn sunset.”

What a way with words you have, Mr. A. J. Cronin!

You can picture his wonder in the lovely description.

The book is filled with simple treasures, nuggets of wisdom and throughout it,

deep philosophy. The book takes a crooked path, through periods of time,  where

you need to re-read at time, to orient to what part of Father Chisholm’s life you

are in. There is never any doubt in Father Chisholm’s love, belief and faith in God.

His encounters and adventures are vast and absorbing, including danger and

Eastern culture, too.

 

At the end of the book, it closes with the Father going trout-fishing with a poor,

country lad named, Andrew. There is less infirmity in his step. There is added

purpose for living implied. His path has come full circle, back home again.

His adoption of Andrew has given him a

second chance on life.

 

I hope you enjoyed the tour of my books I shared today

along with the fascinating examples to view,

Online tour given through photographs,

or in person at University of Dayton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Identifying ‘Songs’

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A West African tradition that fascinates me, is that when every

woman in their tribe of “Griots” is expecting a baby, they take

time to think and contemplate giving the baby, a ‘song.’ They go

off to meditate and come up with what they feel would be the

specific identifying chant or ‘song’ that will follow the upcoming

baby, throughout his or her life.

Have you ever heard of this tradition? I was so interested in this

and wished to share my source, the May, ’14 “Natural Awakenings”

magazine.  The article’s title is “Live  Your Song: Each of Us

Carries a Unique Inner Tune that Affirms Our True Nature.”

In this article, it explains that each person has a soul, in their

belief system. Each soul has a certain vibration that expresses its

unique and special purpose. It has a ‘flavor’ or ‘essence’ that can

be ‘heard.’

The baby’s birth is greeted by its song, giving it meaning and worth.

The times in the child’s life, where the song plays an important

part are when born, when getting ready to attend school, initiation

into adulthood and the time of marriage. The loving embrace of its

tune and melody is to keep the child feeling valuable and included.

If the child, young adult or grown adult should happen to break the

tribe’s rules or even worse, break a law, the tribe will circle the one

who has fallen away from them, chanting and singing their song.

The hope is that the community’s love will overwhelm the individual

and help them to find their way back to their original path. The final

time the Griot tribe, in West Africa, sings the special song is as family,

friends and the community gather at their bedside, helping them to

pass onto the next world, with the memory of their past life’s song.

I like the idea of a song, that our friends would know and recognize

it as ours. I would hope that we would always feel ‘in tune’ with our

family and friends. When we should ever wander away, move or

change our life’s direction, it would be so comforting to know that

our ‘song’ follows us, wherever we go.

Our ‘song’ would help lead us back home again, knowing the true

love, friendship and sense of belonging is waiting for us.

I had not realized that there are others, scientists and researchers,

who have studied this philosophy and practice of finding one’s ‘song.’

The persons considered “modern pioneers in vibrational energy,”

are Sharry Edwards (bio-acoustic biologist) and Donna Eden (energy

medicine field). They have independently detected that each of us has

a “fundamental signature frequency that can be equated to our unique

song that persists throughout our life.”

Some would say the ocean ‘calls to them,’ others would think that the

railroad train is their sound, with the thumping wheels along the track.

Natural songs can include birds. (That is my ‘song,’ not just because of

my name but the story about my Grandfather’s message sent through

the cardinal’s song).

The two women mentioned, Sharry and Donna, feel we innately seek

certain natural sounds that reinforce and strengthen our song.’

Other examples I read about were the sound of the surf, wind, rain or snow

falling. I could ‘hear,’ or imagine, someone’s ‘song’ in the trees shaking

from the breeze, the shivery feeling of the night sky filled with stars and

the moon. I think that some crave and need the sun’s warmth upon their

skin.

Your ‘song’ can be described as, “cell-to-cell vibrations” within ourselves.

We intuitively feel this these vibrations or rhythms as almost magical.

 

I found this sentence/quotation from the article to be meaningful:

“At one with the universe, our song contributes its part in the infinite

chorus of creation.”

 

(Quotations and research provided by Jill Mattson)

Please share if you feel you have a ‘song’ and let us know what really

‘moves’ you, intuitively.

 

A Handful of Humor for Hump Day

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Do you sometimes find it hard to choose your favorite title for your posts?

I had a few, I will try them out on you…

Wednesday Humor

Midweek Chuckles

Smart Aleck Retorts

Quick Comebacks

and

Smarty Pants!

Here are some carefully chosen situations that there is a funny response given:

1. The police officer got out of his car, as the kid who was stopped for speeding,

rolled down his window.

The officer said,

“I’ve been waiting for you all day!”

The teenager replied,

“Yeah, well I got here as fast as I could!”

The cop finally stopped laughing, sending the teen on his way without a ticket.

 

2. A truck driver was driving along on the freeway when he noticed a sign that

read:  “Low Bridge Ahead.”

Before he knew it, the bridge was right in front of him and his truck got wedged

under it. (This happened on Central Avenue which is Rte. 37, Delaware, Ohio.)

Cars were backed up for miles, back into town.

Finally, a police car made it through on the traffic.  The other side of the road

was open, so it was hard to convince people to let him through!

The policeman got out of his car, walked to the truck driver, put his hands on

his hips and said, “Got stuck, huh?”

“As the small town legend goes” the truck driver replied in a smart a- – way,

“No, I was delivering this bridge and ran out of gas.”

 

3. It was mealtime on an airline flight. (Wonder what airline still serves a meal?)

The flight attendant asked a passenger seated in First Class section:

“Would you like dinner?”

The person asked,

“What are my choices?”

She smiled and leaned over, saying in a confidential tone:

“Yes or no.”

 

4. A lady was picking through the frozen turkeys last Thanksgiving, at the grocery

store. She couldn’t find one big enough for her large family, coming from out of

town. She finally flagged down a stocker, a young man, asking:

“Do these turkeys get any bigger?”

In a deadpan tone, he replied, biting his grin back:

“No, ma’am, they’re dead.”

 

5. A flight attendant was stationed at the departure gate, to check tickets.

As a man approached, she extended her hand for the ticket and he opened

his trench coat and flashed her.

Without missing a beat, she requested:

“Sir, I need to see your ticket, not your stub.”

 

I have become rather ‘lazy’ on Wednesdays, giving you smiles but no original

thoughts. It was another hot day and hope you found these to be ‘cool’ and

‘fresh!’

Let me know if you don’t mind this kind of  ‘break’ from my usual researched

and informative essays or my activity oriented adventures with friends and

family!

Creek Walk: Blue Limestone Park

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My only three granddaughters and I went on a special Creek Walk at Blue Limestone

Park on Saturday afternoon on June 14, 2014. Why note the date? It is the one where

I truly felt I changed their sweet, little lives. I asked if they would prefer, as we drove

past the beautiful new Big Toy, gym equipment installed at this ‘ancient park’ to play

there?

The unified answer was, “No, Nana!” The M & M girls, who are only 3 and 5 years old,

sang those lovely words out loudly. As they finished, their soon (next week) to be 10

year old sister, said these heart-warming words to this humble, nature-loving ‘hippie’

from the seventies,

“Nana, we look forward every year to being able to explore along the creek, cross over

the rocks and go under the train tunnel!”

Lara made me burst in pride, looking in my rearview mirror at her, my little step-

granddaughter, who is mine as well as others’. I said in reply,

“Thank you, Lara! This means so much to me!”

She came back instantly,

“You are the ONLY one who does this with us!”

Landen had gone off to be with the other two grandsons, Micah and Skyler, into the

land of video games and boys’ interests at my oldest daughter’s house. I was having

a good time, this day, with the ‘promise’ given at the onset to get ice cream cones

for three out of four of us, while Marley, whose ‘tummy hurts’ when she eats dairy

foods, will either choose a sherbet or a cookie, at our local place.

What did we find on our walk?

We found the light shining so brightly through the train trestle that I could not

capture through my camera lens, the brightly lit yellowish green still Spring like

branches and silhouettes up ahead of our journey. I took pictures of Lara, carefully

placing each foot upon the next rock, one by one, telling us behind her, of which

ones were ‘wobbly’ or ‘rocking back and forth.’

I helped my other two, sometimes having to hold their hand, putting my foot in

a simple sneaker, down into the clear and rushing creek water. They were filled

with a different kind of trepidation, I sensed a change in their development from

last year’s walk. They were more aware of the ‘danger’ of falling onto rocks and

the sense of imbalance to the stones. They had had more recent bumps and bruises,

evidenced on Marley’s shin and Makyah’s cheek. Little light bluish bruises, which

each carried their own story.

When we reached the place where they have to lean on the cold, damp wall of the

trestle, built of blue limestone rock, the oldest, Lara, was in the lead. She asked

why there would be mud up here, on the ‘shelf?’

I told her that sometimes the waters must have been higher or the wind roaring

through the tunnel, had brought mud upon the place we were walking. I also

told her the truth,

“Nana doesn’t really know the answer to that question, just a guess!”

When we got to the other side of the tunnel, to me, it is like a ‘fairy land.’ We saw

birds swooping, cheerily greeting our arrival here I saw so many branches of trees

leaning in, roots rising up and then arches created by low slung trees, bent into

bows. When they were under an arch, I asked the trio of girls to turn around.

They immediately did, knowing my camera was ready to capture this moment.

Lara, placing her arms around both the girls, showing the living definition of

‘sisterhood.’ The light filtering through the combination of hues of deep green,

light yellowish green and shadows made an entrancing photograph.

Mentally, I noted, three copies need to be made.

You see, I may not share the photos of my adventures with you, but I make

miniature albums of 36 pictures for each of the six grandchildren. They come

and take one of the recently made ones, sit and look them over. Their parents

make cd’s and videos on their cell phones, while I make the picture books that

let them know what seasonal adventures ensued during the past months.

Once in awhile, lately, the five year old, Marley has been curious about my first

husband, their “Poppi” who they did not realize was married to me, ‘once upon

a time.’ She asks to see photographs of our wedding, our days of young parent-

hood, raising her Daddy and her Aunt Carrie. Marley was thoughtful, again,

yesterday. She asked,

“Did you bring my Daddy here, when he was a little boy?”

I told her,

“Yes! In those days, there were tons of tadpoles or pollywogs, in these little

ponds that are back here, behind the big lake. The kids would bring buckets,

even ones I babysat, and we would all explore this area. Your Daddy, when

he was in 6th grade was allowed to come here on his bicycle and fish in the

Blue Limestone ‘lake’ that really is a ‘quarry.'”

I asked, as we climbed over a fallen tree, the little ones studying a spider,

bright, almost ‘neon’ green moss, and some little toadstools growing on the

side of it:

“Do you want to know what a quarry is?”

They all three listened as I explained how the Ohio Wesleyan University and

other buildings around their hometown had blue limestone that had been

‘mined’ from first the big ‘lake’ and then, later the smaller holes that became

other ‘lakes’ surrounding where we were walking beside.

We reached a ‘break’ in the trees, walked to the edge of the creek, finding in

the dirt, hoof marks of deer and also the smaller prints of raccoons and one

set of bunny tracks. I gathered them together and we all ducked under a low

slung branch, pointing across the creek, the separated undergrowth, the

path where the deer ran through the woods. We also could see, with a little

turn of our head, an opening where you could see the blue-green, almost

turquoise colored water of one of the more shallow quarries. I pointed this

out, saying:

“Your Daddy, Aunts Felicia and Carrie liked to swim in that ‘pond.'”

Oh boy! What a “can of worms” I did not foresee opening, with that remark!

I am sure you can guess, they wanted to go right across that creek and jump

into that smaller quarry!

I reminded them that their parents had bought a YMCA pass to the pools,

both indoors and outdoors. That, in those days, the possibility of algae and

other more dangerous bacteria were not so common. After all, this would

have been over 20 years ago!

They are such respectful children, allowing me to side track them, letting

them to think about taking off their shoes to dangle them in the creek

water.

I had them wipe their faces first, arms next, systematically going from

the top of their bodies to their feet, when we got back to the car. Then,

we carefully placed their special little mementos of their creek walk on

the passenger seat of the car:  wild lilac flower branches, three hickory

nuts that had been cracked open, halved neatly to reveal an inner design

that Lara found fascinating, the other younger ones chiming in that they

also “needed one of those!” and the wild daisies for their mother.

Then, having cleaned up, we ran down or rolled down, depending on

our age, the hill leading to the place where we would cross the parking

lot and play on the Big Toy!

Later, while sitting and savoring our treats, we were gazing, all four of

us, westward. There were first appearing, cotton candy blend of pink

and azure blue billowing clouds, then an orange-ish golden hue, and

finally a fire igniting across the sky.

When we got home, we all looked up at the waning Full Strawberry Moon,

the clear dark sky lit up with its presence. I said out loud, “Thank you,

God for this beautifully perfect day!”

Lara, who attends church more often than not, with her local father’s

mother, (Grandma) exclaimed: (I am not making this up!)

“Amen!!”

 

 

 

Transporting Out of Myself

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*Sunrise*

There are long, hot days in the warehouse.

Sometimes I feel like a tugboat chugging along,

Pulling great amounts of weight behind me.

I like the idea of a big swale following me,

With waves of blue and white bubbles spraying!

Sometimes I feel like a barge,

Where there are no people on board.

I am barely breaking through the water,

Parting waves and leaving ripples in my wake.

*Mid-Day*

I would like to be ‘The Little Engine That Could.’

I like the idea of the circus animals on board,

Children along the countryside waving and cheering!

Then, there is the clatter and the clanging of another

Fantasy transportation,

‘Chitty, chitty, bang, bang!’

Up above the puffy clouds in an azure blue sky,

Flying weightless, effortlessly,

“I can fly!”

It is not always pretty nor easy,

This getting older in this creaky body!

Crashes,

Chugs,

Clatters,

Bangs,

Pops,

and

*Sunset*

I will do whatever it takes,

To get to the part,

Where I am soaring,

Smooth, easy sailing,

Through the atmosphere.

I see the horizon,

Far off in the distance.

Brilliant hues of red,

Laced orange,

Golden light.

 

Robin Oldrieve Cochran

June 4, 2014

 

 

 

Found Wonders

Image

Two weekends ago,

during our exciting

Arts Festival weekend,

I visited the library’s

Annual Book Sale

and Fundraiser.

Searching carefully,

sifting through dusty piles

and carts of tossed books,

I found ones tucked nicely,

waiting for just the

‘right’ owner.

Limited spaces

requires diligence

to limit additions.

In a unique and lovely book,

I discovered the perfect

June poem to share with you.

Serendipity,

kismet and karma

wrapped up into

the sweetest

bundle!

Always fantastic

to find treasures

in amongst forlorn

discards’ bin!

“Fancy’s Hour,”

Hardly-aged cobalt blue,

gold engraved witch

adorning the cover.

Scarcely read book?

While an engraved

gold fairy perches

on its binding.

The author, Norman C. Schlichter,

had written two other books.

One was called,

“Children’s Voices”

and the other one was,

“Voices of Joy.”

Oh, how ecstatic

I would have been

to have found those

other two books,

among those

tossed aside.

Publication date of 1922,

proceeds “Fancy’s Hour.”

What antiquities!

My brilliant blue book’s

copyright date is 1924.

The Publisher,

C. Winston Company,

Philadelphia.

Thumbing through book,

playful and exquisite,

this poem caught my eye

and enchanted my heart.

Instead of saving it,

for all the men out there

for Father’s Day,

Here is my own

Personal Dedication:

“This is for all those inquisitive boys

who grew up to play important roles in

the lives of curious children.”

By Robin Cochran, 6/1/14.

“When I Was Little”

by Norman C. Schlichter, (1924)

“When I was little, I wanted to know

The how and the why of the beautiful snow.

Why this was this, and that was that,

And all there was inside of my cat.

I wanted to find the giant purse,

That held the pennies of the Universe.

I wanted to know who lighted the stars,

And the destination of railroad cars.

I wanted to know what elephants knew,

And to see a mountain through and through.

I wanted to know why birds had wings,

And more than a thousand similar things.

And, now that I’m older, and grow to be

A man of ripe maturity.

There are things and things that I want to know,

And, like a child in the long ago,

No one can tell me them here below.”

This seems like a kind of Sunday message that fits our 84 degree

weather day. I walked in the brilliant sunshine, observing flowers

and green everywhere. Cars bustling and people sitting out on porches.

My oldest daughter had just stopped by to pick up the boys, heading

off to Mingo pool. The library’s coolness upon my warm arms, gave me

shivers. I sat for a moment, reflecting about the weekend and children’s

wonder of things. In their curiosity, over the Saturday hours we

spent together, Skyler and Micah had been interested in playing at

Mingo Park. They had wondered why people would run in half and quarter

marathons when you are ‘allowed to walk?’ For the cause of the American

Lung Association, Delaware had sponsored “The New Moon Half Marathon

and Quarter Marathon,” on May 31, 2014. During our normally short trip from

their home across town, we had been circumvented and rerouted, to get to the

park. The boys had been fascinated by an intricate spider’s web with its white

‘nest’ of babies found nestled in the low branches of a pine tree. They had

been picking up pine cones, seeking the coolness in the shade of the trees,

away from the Big Toy, where they had made friends and chased them, in

endless games of “Tag, you’re ‘It.'” Too many other questions and thoughts

to cover, the spider’s web led us to the subject of books. Skyler asked,

“Did you ever read the book, “Charlotte’s Web,” Nana?”

I smiled, nodded and responded back,

“Third grade was a perfect time to

read that book! I am so glad you

know about that, Skyler!

Please tell me about it.

Tell me all the things

I may have forgotten.”