Category Archives: trivia

Bits and Pieces

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There have been a few odds and ends that have been rattling around

in my mind. Some are not worthy of an entire post, some I could in

the future, expand and expound about them. There are interesting

little tidbits that I heard recently on the news or read in a magazine.

 

One article of interest was found in “University of Dayton Magazine,”

which was about the UD Flyers’ football team in 1939,  going out to

California and visiting a famous alumni. I love any kind of ‘archive’

photographs, this one with the dashing movie star, Tyrone Power,

and the football team, all in their coats, ties and dress pants caught

my eye.

 

My favorite Tyrone Power’s movie is called, “Witness for the Prosecu-

tion.” It turns out this was one of the last movies he ever made. Sadly,

at age 44, the action movie star was battling with a sword, had a heart

attack and died on the way to the hospital. The movie he had been

acting in was called, “Solomon and Sheba.” I have never seen this one

nor his beginning two either.  “Merchant of Venice” was his first film

and his second movie, which earned him popularity and a place on the

billboards was, “Girls’ Dormitory.”

 

I believe we need to have a new version of this, a ‘re-make’ of this

light-hearted movie. I sense this would have innocent humor, with

sly innuendos. Nothing like the current R-rated comedies which rely

so much on stupid jokes and mean acts.

(Yes, this comment is a little ‘tongue in cheek.’)
Anyway, Tyrone Power originated from Cincinnati, Ohio. He was

the son of an actor and grandson of a comedian. He had, as they

frequently say, “acting in his blood.” He was born in 1914 and the

sword-fighting scene which ended his life, was in 1958.

 

A quote from the “UD Magazine,” uses the source of an Arizona State

University Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies describing

Tyrone Power as:

“Mystical, darkly handsome, a glorious matinee idol and a rather

‘forgettable’ actor.”

 

Although this comment is rather harsh,  Tyrone Powers was chosen

in an actor’s popularity poll taken of University of Dayton students

and he was found to be number four. The university newspaper took

one of their students from ages 17-18 up to ages 22-23. This poll was

conducted after the UD football team had visited 20th Century Fox.

The tour had contacted and was led by Tyrone Power, an alumni.

 

Tyrone Power may have ‘grown’ more serious over the years,

following several ‘good looking’ and ‘attractive’ stars and starlets

choosing parts with more depth in the characters and plot lines.

 

Here is the list of the Top 3 Actors ahead of Tyrone Powers

(from the UD newspaper poll, taken in 1939):

1. Errol Flynn

2. Jimmy Stewart

3. Gary Cooper

 

While he led a short life, Tyrone Power ‘lived large,’ in my mind.

Here are a few examples of Power’s personal adventures:

1. Served in the military, as a United States Marines, as a pilot.

This was in 1942, during WWII and one particular exciting time

was during transporting materials to Iwo Jima. Next month, on

my February calendar, I make note of the famous day when the

U.S. flag was raised on Iwo Jima.

 

2. “Wild” in his love life, dating co-stars while the movies were

being filmed, just to move on to the next movie and starlet.

 

3. Like James Dean, he enjoyed riding a motorcycle.

 

4. In his 44 years on earth, he was married three times.

 

5. Rather ‘scandalous’ for his time, he relied upon the income of

his second wife. Financial support in the acting world, sometimes

did have the “leading woman” making more than her husband.

 

6. “Mark of Zorro,” was a favorite movie and the poster is still one

of my favorites of all time. His work as a ‘swash buckling’ leading

character and dangerous criminal were displayed in, “Jesse James”

and “The Black Swan.”

 

February 27th- Coming up next month, another famous actor and

director, a genius of his time, is going to be featured at the Gateway

Film Center. This is called an “Independent Cinema in the Heart

of Columbus.” I love the catchy title, “Magician: The Astounding

Life and Work of Orson Welles.”  I am going to see if my friend,

Anna,  or my guy friend, Bill, will go with me to check out one of

the films presented there.  I would like to see the documentary of

this famous Hollywood legendary star and director.

 

A small little ‘bit of wisdom,’ which could be used in so many

different ways is the expression,

“Pachoko Pachoko,”

which in the Lake Malawi area of Africa means,

“Little by little.”

This conjures much meaning in such a succinct form.

 

The CBS Morning has a great feature every week on their Sunday

program which is called, “The Week at a Glance.”  I noticed the

Hall of Fame Awards for Theater were going to be presented on

Monday, January 26, 2015.

What makes this interesting to me is that I watched, “Amadeus,”

on Saturday after Micah went home. The main antagonist of the

film about Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was Antonio Salieri. In the

movie, this character is played by F. Murray Abraham. Definitely

nice to have this coincidence, seeing an actor I admire and it would

be a great awards show to be able to attend.

 

There is an anniversary of the German “Death Camps,”  Auschwitz

and others this week; January 27, ’15. A day of memorial and tribute

to those who either died or survived their horrendous experiences

there.

 

All those Star Wars fans, who have money to splurge on memorabilia,

there will be a major auction on Wednesday.  Hope you have a fun

and happy mid-week celebration. If you don’t have money saved for

buying souvenirs, you can always indulge in watching one of the “Star

Wars” movies.

 

Thursday, Amy Poehler is being given “Woman of the Year” award by

the Hasty Pudding Theatrical group. She is best known for her comedy

skits on “Saturday Night Live,” along with her “Parks and Rec” t.v.

show.

 

Harvard University’s group is simply called, “The Pudding.” In 1897,

John Wheelwright described the cross-dressing theatrical group as:

“A kindly association of men of all ages in a gay evening of simple

enjoyment.”

 

I am sure Amy will have a ‘ball’ and she will fit right in, too. I hope to

check this out ‘after the fact,’ on YouTube. I enjoyed when Neil Patrick

Harris’ was given his Roast for “Man of the Year” another year.

 

At University of Cincinnati, there will be a police enforcement

symposium, incorporating all aspects of agencies, beginning a

meaningful ‘conversation’ about their performance in the pursuit

of justice. This will be held on Friday, January 30, 2015.

 

The other activities, on Saturday and Sunday, were so quickly

spoken that I did not catch them. They said something about what

President Obama was going to do and something about the “Annie”

awards show is for. Keep your ears open for these two upcoming

subjects in the news. . .

 

Tonight, there will be a spell-binding special mini-series about the

Revolutionary War. It is titled, “Sons of Liberty” and ironically it

has mainly actors who are not American.  For example, George

Washington’s character is portrayed by Irish actor, Jason O’Mara.

John Hancock is played by British actor, Rafe Spall, in a sort of

flamboyant performance. (Interesting; hm-m!) The British actor,

Marton Csokas will play General Thomas Gage.

 

I am looking forward to checking out this television event on the

period of time historically where we were “enemies” with the Brits,

while seeing them portray the leaders of this revolution. Interested

also, in who they have playing Benjamin Franklin. The British actor

who portrays Samuel Adams is Ben Barnes. This presentation

will be on the American History Channel.

 

“Sons of Liberty” is n conflict with my S.A.G. awards ceremony,

though. The Screen Actor’s Guild show will be tonight, also. May

need to ask Jenny to ‘DVR’ the other show, or just pop in on it,

during commercial breaks. I just love award ceremonies, along

with the Red Carpet pre-shows.

 

In our brains, scientists, researchers and physicians have studied

many things. The newest findings of where ‘happiness’ can be

found through the measurement of the area of the brain called

the “striatum.” There even is a new numerical formula which is

able to ‘measure’ happiness by our brain’s reactions to rewards.

The formula, though, relies on our reactions to our expectations.

This was also featured on CBS Sunday Morning, January 25, 2015.

I am sure this combination of numbers and processes can be

found somewhere on the CBS coverage, it was shown written in

numerals and I could not write it quickly enough, nor would I

have been able to comprehend this.

Apparently, if you have high expectations, as so many positive

people walk around and hope for the best do, than the way

the numbers may reflect lower amounts of happiness. This

brought up a commentator’s valid question,

“If you go into your day with little or no expectations are you

more likely to experience a measurable amount of happiness?”

This portion of the program was titled, “Not Great Expectations,”

should you wish to examine the research and reactions to this

new equation.

 

I have featured another article or post about brain studies, which

used endorphins and other information to measure happiness.

 

I will still head off every day, ‘into the world,’ with lots of hope

and high expectations. I tend to believe you will receive more

and will acknowledge more simple acts and things which will

give you bursts of endorphins and fill your life with happy

moments. I could not go out, seeking nothing and expect to

find happiness. This just goes against the ‘grain’ of my brain!

 

What did you read today that gave you ‘pause’ or something

to think about?

 

Have you any new information or something you may not wish

to fill a whole post about, but wish to share here?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Songs and Bands Stand the Test of Time

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While driving in your car, especially here  in America, we have the

luxury of a radio, sometimes if a newer car, Syrius. I used to have

this feature and would program my ride somewhere with such fun

topics as “Coffee Shop” tunes or “Old Rock and Roll.” I was listening

to Casey Kasem’s “America’s Top 40” program on the radio. Rest in

peace, you good man! (Casey Kasem died in June, 2014, at age 82 of

sepsis.) I was struck by this comment, paraphrased since my mind is

not a recorder nor a computer:

 

“More than 23,000 songs were written and sung during the seventies

in the United States, only 370 were major grossing songs, (making

Top Ten lists). In this time period, only TWO were number one hits

written by a duo of song-writers.

I will come back, from the commercial to tell you who they were. . .”

 

Of course, I tried to memorize this comment, was an a red light and

jotted down the two numbers and waited ‘with bated breath’ for the

answer. Why the excitement in this upcoming response? You may not

know me well, but music is a special part of my life and the 70’s were

my stomping grounds, where music laid its foundation and made a

huge impact on my life.  I was in band from 4th grade on, played in

three bands in high school, marching band, symphonic band, pep

band for the basketball team and homecoming pep rallies, along with

the stepping stone to symphonic band: concert band. I loved the way

current songs on the radio made their way into our performances,

along with learning the meaning of different musical terms and the

way the music would build and pull on my heartstrings and soul,

during crescendo’s.

 

The two songs were “Loco-Motion” and “Go Away, Little Girl”

whose authors were Carole King and Gerry Goffin.

The first song has such an incredible legacy, along with being a

fun song. It is one of the only songs of all time, which has been

number one in three different decades sung by three different

styles or cultures. What a landmark song!

1. Little Eva, who is African American, sang the song, “Loco-Motion”

in 1962. This helped her career in singing really soar.

 

2. Grand Funk Railroad, (rock and roll, Caucasian band), sang it

in 1974 and put their own ‘brand’ on the song, “Loco-Motion.”

 

3. The Austrailan singer, Kylie Minogue, made this song go

international with her 1988 rendition.

Way to go, Carole King and Gerry Goffin for making this song

a catchy tune that went across generations and cultures.

 

The second song, this tremendous duo wrote, “Go Away, Little

Girl” was one of my favorites in my teenaged years. When I had

a crush on a senior in high school, Todd D. of Science Club and

marching band “fame,” I pictured Todd singing this to me, along

with meeting me by the Bay High Rockets’ goal posts in five years

after I graduated from high school. (I was only a mere freshman

when I had this ‘crush.’)

1. “Go Away, Little Girl” was first sung by Bobby Vee in ’62. Soon

to be followed and reaching higher sales, by Steve Lawrence later

the same year, in 1962. This made the Popular Top 20 list.

2. The Happenings sang and got this song into the top selling

songs in 1966. This was also a popular song with my friends.

3. The most popular version and more often played song, “Go Away

Little Girl” is sung by Donnie Osmond, 1971.

 

While listening to Casey Kasem, another time, I wrote down this

short note on a scrap of paper last Autumn.

The “most popular song played at funerals” is Frank Sinatra’s

popular top 10 song, “My Way.” I can imagine a lot of people who

would embrace this in their different life styles and endeavors but

had no idea that this was so beloved.

It would take years to ‘replace’ this song but a new hit being played

at funerals is from the British comedy movie, “Life of Brian.” Who

could imagine choosing a song from this movie? Well, I can tell

you one: my brother Randy still roars in laughter while watching

this Monty Python spoof movie, once a year with my family. I am

surprised though at this musical choice:

“Always Look on the Bright Side of Life,” by Eric Idle of Monty

Python wrote this as a reaction to “Give a Little Whistle” from

the Disney franchise of upbeat movies, “Pinocchio.”

 

I am sure Eric is laughing out loud should he find out how popular

this song has become over the years.  Somehow, I thought a more

popular song would be, “Taps” or “Amazing Grace.”

 

Frankly, I feel this is refreshing and would cheer me up to know

I don’t have to listen to “Candle in the Wind,” at Randy’s memorial

service, should I outlive him. This may irreverent comment, but

believe me, Randy would be amused at this song being played,

so ‘Always Look at the Bright Side of Life,” will be on the playlist,

brother. Oh, that reminds me, I will have to add one of the songs

from his other ‘favorite’ movie, “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?”

 

MORE MUSICAL NOTES:

 

The recent death of the Gospel legend, Andrae Crouch, requires a

respectful “note” and pause. At age 72, Andrae had influenced many

listeners with his heartfelt lyrics and soulful songs. Here are a few

which you may wish to check out:

“Let the Church Say Amen.”

“Soon and Very Soon.”

“Take Me Back.”

Along with being what many considered a fine singer and composer,

Andrae helped influence three legendary musicians. Although, he

may not have helped increase each of their popularity levels; he

undoubtedly changed their lives. This was the kind of man Andrae

Crouch was. The tributes and interviews all held warm memories

and kind thoughts of this man.

Michael Jackson was helped with his own song, “The Man in the

Mirror,” by Andrae Crouch’s adjusting its musical arrangement.

Elton John and Madonna received positive influences upon their

careers, by Gospel leader, Andrae Crouch.

 

 

The James Band was one of the alternative rock groups I sometimes

listened to in the 80’s. Do you have any memories of this different band?

Their roots came from Manchester, England. They took breaks in their

recording and individual careers. Some time off, as you may remember.

The first’break’ was a rather long one, after being popular in the 80’s

and leaving the musical scene in 2001;  they got back together in 2007.

Then, another 7 year time span ensued, until last year (2014).

While the members followed their individual pursuits, the James Band

still played on the alternative rock scene on the  radio, though.

Their sales over the years amount to over $25 million.

 

Imagine my surprise and pleasure to say the James Band are back

on the road and had a new album come out in June, 2014 titled,

“Le Petit Mort” including a popular new song, “Moving On.” This

is a solemn, questioning song, one which shows how aging and time

passing influences how you choose your path. James Band has

changed their sound and song choices.  The wisdom found while

growing older is reflected here in their music. The slow pace rises

and slowly builds into a crescendo, with trumpets and guitars

playing. Here are a few snippets of the lyrics I heard of this “new”

song, “Moving On,”

“Leave a little light on. . .”

“Will we recognize our friends when this cycle ends?”

“Will it start again?”

There are moments where time is like seeds being planted,

dreams taken for granted.

Welcome back, James Band!

 

Mick Jones poured out his long and winding road life’s path,

in an interview on the 12/28/14 CBS Sunday Morning show.

Mick’s path is one which encompasses being part of a British

“Spooky Tooth” band, playing with “C’est La Vie” and a French

man named Holliday. Mick Jones said Holliday forgives his

leaving the group to find his own way. Holliday was a “French

Elvis,” according to Jones. Then, Jones proceeded to get to the

‘meat’ of his musical career with “Foreigner.” Not being one

who studies musicians’ lives as they are progressing, I was very

interested in how Jone’s compelling journey went. I always liked

Foreigner’s  songs, “Feels Like the First Time,” “Head Games,”

and “I’ve Been Waiting for a Girl Like You.” When the group

‘went soft’ in one of the band member’s eyes, (or ears)- they parted

ways and the band split up back in 2003.

Mick Jones and Ian McDonald were inducted into the Songwriters’

Hall of Fame, June, 2013, with Elton John presenting them this

prestigious award. They have never made it into the Rock and Roll

Hall of Fame.

Foreigner was unique in its combination of three British and three

American band musicians and singers joining forces. The band’s

3 Brits were Mick Jones, Ian McDonald and Dennis Elliot, while

the 3 Americans were Lou Gramm, Al Greenwood and Ed Gagliardi.

 

Wow, this has been 12 years since then! Their music is still daily

‘in my ears’ on the radio. Foreigner is a group which has stood the

‘test of time,’  I believe. Only one member of the original band,

has passed away. Ed Gagliardi died in May, 2014.

All have not worked together since 1989. They have had a few varied

combinations of the players.

In 2013,  Mick Jones, Ian McDonald and Lou Gramm renewed their

ties and are working on a new collaboration. They were part of the

Summer of 2013 Tour, including Eagles’ Don Felder playing with

Foreigner and the band Styx.

 

What are some “musical notes” you have been listening to?

What musician or group do you feel has stayed the most ‘current’ ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art, Environment and Health News

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“I loved the title for this short entry in the “Natural Awakenings”

magazine: “Looking at Beautiful Art Bumps Up Brain Activity.”

At Japan’s Oita University there were outstanding research results

and I will share them with you. Another part of this article will give

you some natural choices to replace antibiotics in fighting those

winter illnesses. While looking at locally grown foods, the pesticide

levels are less in those choices over the ones found in stores. Also,

an interesting find that I came across had two ecological and ‘green’

facts to make sure we contribute to a better world.

How did they measure the increase of brain activity ? You may have

guessed that in the Japanese study of MRI scans, (which are magnetic

resonance imaging screenings) were the source for the scientific

results found in this research study.

I enjoyed the comparison of slides shown of still lifes and landscape

paintings to the actual real artwork of paintings in a museum. The

39 subjects were shown slides of art and later, presented with the

paintings. Another element they were researching was asking them

to express their feelings of the element of beauty in the  slides and

then again, what degree of beauty they felt the actual paintings were.

The most “beautiful” in the subject’s ‘eyes’ of ‘real art’ were rated

significantly higher in the pre-experimental phase over the slides of

paintings.  They called the slides of the paintings, “corresponding

photographic analogs.”

“The MRI’s showed that during the experiment, portions of the brain’s

frontal lobe, related to emotions, memory, learning and decision-making

were activated.” (November, Central Ohio; “Natural Awakenings.”)

Final significant results were that when the researchers compared the

“positive effects of aesthetic appreciation of the art paintings versus

the photographs, they noted more activity at the back of the subject’s

brain.” Which means both areas of the frontal lobes and back part of

the brain were stimulated but the back part was raised at a higher level

of activity.  The location in the back parts were in the bilateral cuneus,

which is a part of the occipital lobe and the left lingual gyrus or ridge.

This means the basic visual processing location and the visual memory,

logical ordering and dreaming areas were the most stimulated with

it being verified on the MRI’s.

When we eat foods, such as fruits and vegetables, we need to make

sure we are getting them from a ‘safe’ source. I think this is a fact we

are all aware of but the interesting facts were presented once again,

which prodded me to share this information here. Conventionally

grown foods contain pesticide residues that are 3-4 times higher in

organically grown foods. This was found in the “British Journal of

Nutrition,” where they conducted 343 research studies and published

last June. Since from the farm to the market is a continually growing

industry, it is nice to have facts that support this movement. The ones

grown on organic farms also were found to have higher levels of healthy

nutrients such as minerals, vitamins and antioxidents. Ones that are

grown with phosphorus fertilizers and not including mineral nitrogen

in their practices were found to contain higher levels of cadmium. The

study’s results confirmed this in the following statement:

“Results indicate that switching from conventional to organice crop

consumption would result in a 20-40 % increase in crop-based anti-

oxidants and polyphenolic intake levels.

The emphasis on Honey and Ginger being such healthy and natural

curative power sources even fought the drug-resistant bacteria which

have a list of long names:

“Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E Coli) and Klebsiella

pneumoniae.” Also known as “Super bugs.”

* Further clinical examination is needed to standardize the amounts

in these two ingredients for cold, flu and germ fighting. The research

was conducted at Ethipia’s University of Gondar College of Medicine.

I concluded, we may as well include healthy doses of honey in our

diet, along with including ginger while cooking. I love sauces where

the sweetness is balanced by the spice ginger, along with making a dark

black tea, with some ginger added for flavoring, honey for sweetening.

India’s green project to improve their environment, is focusing on the

areas along their 62,137 miles of highways. India’s Rural Development

Ministry is following their kind of “Johnny Appleseed,” America’s

noted man of  spreading apple seeds along different areas. India’s

hero is named Jadav “Molai” Payeng, an Indian man who. all by

himself, planted 1,360 acres of forest.

This project has three focuses: to help provide jobs for the rural poor

people, include youth in employment and improving the environment.

The country of India has been suffering from severe air pollution.

The World Health Organization released unfortunate statistics of India’s

youth unemployment rate being 10.2 percent and #6 on a list of World’s

Ten Worst Cities with air pollution. The Prime Minister Narenda Modi

has announced a goal of spreading electricity to every home by 2019,

which will rely largely on solar power. Other areas of health concern are

also being targeted for cleaning the Ganges and Yamuna rivers.

 

Merry Christmas news for environmentally concerned:

“The Greenest Tree” is supporing buying locally grown trees,

preferable ones that will be grown outdoors, with a close

second being ones that are cut down in tree farms that are

purposely evergreens growing for resale.

Here is the reason:

85% of artificial trees are sourced from China and often contain

toxic chemicals.

Looking at the carbon trail is also important, meaning how much

effort and use of power and resources was used to get the tree to

your home.

Temporary sidewalk or street corner tree lots may be getting trees

where pesticides are used to create the Perfect Tree. These are not

good fro homes, again, comparing this to the natural sourced trees.

Sometimes, home-grown products are just about what we put into

our body for food, but what we breathe for a month while it is in

our living areas.

According to National Geographic Green Guide, Americans actually

discard 30 million cut trees after the holidays. Oh my goodness!

The wood is ‘wasted’ in landfills.  One state that is leading a better

way to go with old Christmas trees is in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

where they collect them to combat coastal erosion. Way to go!

Locate tree growers by state and learn how to dispose trees responsibly.

There are great places and resources to check up on facts:

http://PickYourOwnChristmasTree.org

http://GreenPromise.com

http://Tinyurl.com/65oqh9

There are detailed steps for care and planting potted trees at

http://WikiHow.com and other locations of the Tinyurl.com

website.

Do you mind letting me know if any of these facts were helpful

or ones you learned today? Also, any other Green Choices or

healthy suggestions are welcome here.

 

 

October’s This and That

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When I have a few odds and ends, loose ends which need to stop unraveling, I usually

post a “this and that” summary. It is a little like when you go to a garage sale, flea

market or thrift store, some history and strange things may show up.

First of all, this is more of a serious subject. When I wrote my slightly negative review

of the movie, “August: Osage County,” you may remember that I said the movie had

one ‘saving grace?’ It was in the calm, interesting Native American housekeeper.

Little did I know that she would turn up missing just a week after my article was

posted. Her real name is “Misty Upham,” and she has been missing a week. There

have been people ‘close to her,’ mentioning that she has had some financial trouble,

along with being depressed. Her father filed a “Missing Persons” report on October

6, 2014.

Here is a brief biography of Missy Upham. She was born July 6, 1982. My daughter

was born in 1980 and son in 1981, which makes my heart stop, worrying about this

young woman. She could be a classmate or friend of theirs. . . Missy walked out of an

apartment in Auburn, Washington more than a week ago. She was born in Kalispell,

Montana and went to school in Auburn. This is located about 20 miles south of Seattle,

WA. Her biggest acting award was for a movie called, “Frozen River,” where she won an

Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female Actor. She made a series of Native

American television movies, “Skinwalkers,” “Dreamkeeper,” and “Edge of America.” She

played a recurring role in the t.v. series about polygamy called, “Big Love.” She had a role

in “Django Unchained.”

I certainly hope nothing happens to her. I know this is rather unusual but I plan on

keeping Misty Upham in my prayers…

Note: Family and friends are convinced her death was not due to depression. They

believe Misty’s views on Native Americans, may have caused her to get in ‘trouble’

and get murdered. They don’t believe she would commit suicide. I am sad that this

happened to someone who had talent, intelligence and died too young. So sorry

to have to add this, too. (Friday October 17,.)

 

In the Summer of 1986, a man from Tuxedo Park, New York traveled to England.

He had been invited to visit the Palace to dine with the Prince of Wales . This man

was named, James Brown Potter. (I wonder if he was related to Beatrix Potter?)

Anyway, he moved in some fancy, ‘high society’ circles, where he was used to

wearing what they casually called, “an evening suit.”

When he went to an English tailor, J. B. Potter was impressed so much with the

design of a shorter black jacket, on display.  The jacket had a refined look and he

felt distinguished while wearing it to dinner with the Prince of Wales. The satin

lapels were what set it apart from other suits. Later, the added satin, grosgrain

stripe along the matching black pants and a cummerbund were part of the final,

complete “Tuxedo,” otherwise known as a “Tux.”

This was found in the Tuxedo Park ‘archives’ of the local community news.

When J.B. Potter came back to America, he had a New York tailor create this suit,

which he labeled, a “Tuxedo.” In the Fall of 1986, at the Autumn Ball held in New

York City, a man named  Griswold Lorillard, wore the American design of the

styled suit jacket. This is where many people noticed and  commented about

his “Tuxedo”  jacket.

And here, I had imagined someone had visited Antarctica, viewed penguins and

got the idea from their dapper appearance!

 

In an AARP article that comes out in a newsletter, filling in ‘gaps’ of information

during the off months that “AARP Magazine” is not published I found several

famous people who have been diagnosed with Diabetes (Type 2).  I feel this is

an ongoing concern for my good friend, Pat, along with other friends. I think

knowing how others handle their disease can be helpful and encouraging. When

anyone doesn’t feel ‘alone,’ it is good to spread this around. My youngest girl,

who deals with ongoing arthritis, started out at age 12, which helps her to feel

better when she reads about others and their techniques in coping with this

physically debilitating disease. So, in this vein, hope you may find this helpful

to know of some famous people over 5o coping with Diabetes, type 2.

Since 1995, Larry King was diagnosed. He eats many small meals, includes

30 minutes of daily exercise and is careful monitoring his foods.

Patti LaBelle has written three books about Type 2 Diabetes, including some

delicious recipes and light-hearted suggestions. Can you believe her exercise

includes walking her 20 dogs? This would take ME all day, taking only 2 at

a time…

Tom Hanks was diagnosed in 2013 with diabetes and works out, eating healthy

foods. His wife, Rita Wilson, likes to go out on walks with him. Did you know

they met on the movie set of “Volunteers?” It is a funny movie and I had to get

it out from the library to remember this one!

Sherri Shepherd, dropped 40 pounds when she decided to handle her diabetes

starting with a serious weight loss. She has written a humorous book about her

challenges and includes recipes for this particular diet of low carbs and  no white

processed foods and sugar.

Billie Jean King, tennis professional, has been an active spokesperson for Diabetes

and supports fund-raising by appearances on television and in person. She is given

credit for raising public awareness on the subject.

Paula Deen admitted that she was diabetic, after she had many books published

having desserts and mashed potatoes included. She has made significant efforts

speaking and addressing the foods she used to support. Paula has also changed

her famous fat, sugar and butter-laden recipes making them more healthy. She

went through a big controversy over this unfortunate situation and another

situation which does not pertain to diabetes. She admits to still struggling with

what she calls, “stress eating.”

Ben Vereen, the dancer/actor, has been dealing with his diabetes since 2007.

He believes there are “opportunities for a better life.” His positive attitude,

along with continuing exercise, diet and awareness in his regimen have helped

him immensely.

 

Last night I watched a fantastic episode of “Madam Secretary” and I wish to

recommend it again. I had included it on the (at the time, Upcoming Fall

Television shows)  new shows to watch. Then, I had recently commented on

someone’s blog that I did not enjoy it as much as I had hoped. It turns out this

man made an effort to convince me, through comparing it to the excellent writing,

cast and ensemble, “West Wing,” television series. I decided to give it a second

chance, which involved a Chinese young woman seeking asylum in America. It

was a really fascinating plot, it kept me wondering what the Secretary of State

would do.  Whether she would agree to having her stay or send her back. I won’t

ruin this plot for you, since it was a good and satisfying ending, the way it played

out. There was a diplomacy issue, a treaty to sign, involved also. Well acted by

many of the famous people in this cast.  I especially like the marital dynamics

between the leading role of Secretary of State played by Tea Leoni and her nice

husband, played by Tim Daly,  as supportive, sympathetic and understanding.

If you remember “Frasier,” you may also know and recognize Bebe Neuwirth,

starred, off and on, as Frasier’s ex-wife. She came across as  a  ‘mean’ or ‘witchy’

woman in one of the scenes on Sunday’s current show she is part of, but you find

out more about her reasons for being this way. I like when a show takes the time

to include character development.

I am still watching, “Forever,” and “Scorpion.” I am giving up on the quirky plot

lines of “The Red Band Society.” My regular television shows seemed to have

very exciting Season Premiere episodes, catching my interest and keeping me

a faithful viewer.

 

What’s new in your area of the world? Anything bothering you or causing you

concern?

 

If you have a new show you would like to recommend, please let us know. We

still have time to catch up on t.v. shows, by watching on the channels’ websites.

 

 

 

 

Connections: the past with the future

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When I heard that there were two days in a row, celebrating subjects of interest

to me, I was determined to make a ‘big stretch’ and connect the dots. The first day

is based on an animated cartoon t.v. series about the future. It was shown awhile

back, where some of the inventions and special effects have come true. The second

day is one celebrating how we separate our words, making our sentences flow by

using special symbols to separate the words. I think this form of language is swiftly

diminishing, since so many people text, rather than email. While computer emails

have replaced fashioned letters. I am hard pressed to figure out how the celebration

of the first Jetson’s animated cartoon series and the subject of punctuation go together.

 

Traveling into the future with the Jetsons. . .

 

Happy September 23rd: Celebrating the Jetsons!

 

Today, September 23, 2014 is the 52nd Anniversary of the original premiere of the

futuristic, science fictionalized cartoon with child Elroy,  dog Astro, the maid Rosie,

the teen-aged girl named Judy being raised by their parents, Jane and George Jetson.

Here are some interesting facts I found out about this cartoon television series. Did

you know the first two years of “The Jetsons” were shown during “prime time t.v.?”

During 1962 and 1963, this was shown after dinner, after the news during that coveted

time slot of “prime time.” The number of shows totaled 75 episodes and three full-length

feature films. While my children were babies, during the years of 1985-1987, additional

Jetsons cartoons were produced. They are syndicated and repeated over many years after

their original showings.

 

The cartoon series was based loosely on the family in the comic strip, “Blondie.” The father

is drawn tall, lanky and has a tyrant of a boss, named “Mr. Spacely.” Of course Dagwood

Bumstead had a cranky, short-tempered boss, too. I had not put these two together, so

there is another ‘connection,’ that will form a new impulse from one brain wave to another.

(Or one synapse to another!) The setting for the creative cartoon is an imaginary time in

the future, when there would be space vehicles from home to work, transportation, when

there woud be pollution, so there would be little outdoor activities, along with moving

sidewalks (glad we know we have those, at least) and robotic maids. (We have some

versions of automation that could resemble the work provided by Rosie.)

 

The Jetsons family lives in a place called, Skypad Apartments. Their city is called, “Orbit

City.” George’s workplace is called “Spacely’s Space Sprockets.” The apartment building

was designed to remind you of the Seattle Space Needle. There are vague references to

how one gets in and out of the atmosphere, which is supposed to have air pollution.

The people wear space helmets while transporting around the city and various other

buildings. You probably may remember George’s space vehicle turning into a brief-

case.

 

In promotional information provided for the setting and relationships in the scripts,

the ages and some of the individual interests and details are given. This is something I

was not aware of, since I don’t think we knew their ages. The plots of the shows may

have revealed many of this, but my mind was intrigued with the idea of an actual

script and characteristics given for each character.

 

By the way, “T.V. Guide’s list of the 25 Greatest Science-Fiction Legends” considers

“The Jetsons” to be one of those famous influences and includes them in the top 25.

 

George is 40 years old, while going to work he wears a suit and tie, similar to some of

our fathers representing the period that the series was shown on television. Occasionally

at home, the family wears leisure suits that resemble jogging suits with some interesting

shoulder pads.

Jane’s outfits always seem very ‘hip’ with some points on her cuffs and shoulder pads.

Jane is given the age of 33 years old. She portrays an active homemaker participating in

clubs such as the Galaxy Women’s Historical Society.  Jane’s details include liking and

enjoying artwork. Her favorite artists are “Leonardo de Venus” and “Picasso Pia.”  Judy

is a ‘typical’ depiction of a teenager of 15 years old. She attends Orbit High School,  likes

to shop, likes talking about clothes and is often on her telephone. There is a cool futuristic

‘digital’ diary she has; which reminds me of today’s cell phones and computers. Elroy

attends Little Dipper School. He is 6 1/2 years old and is studying some serious subjects.

He studies Space History, Astrophysics and Star Geometry. He enjoys playing with his dog,

Astro, who talks without his “r” sound.

Later during the 80’s additional series, there was an interesting creation of an alien, who

is named, “Orbitty.” Elroy’s playmate has spring-like legs since there were some robotics

involved in this guy who changes colors with his moods.

 

 

 

Moving on, possibly the way the world revolves. . .

to September 24, 2014.

 

Traveling into the distant past. . .

when punctuation was important to use. . .

 

This is the Tenth Anniversary of one of my personal favorite subjects:

Happy National Punctuation Day!

 

There is a man who was concerned about our nation’s ability to spell,

use proper grammar and punctuation. His name is Jeff Rubin. He has

had for some time, wanted people to let him know when they hear of

punctuation errors in their every day lives. He also wishes that the various

spokemen and women, along with newscasters, would be more aware of

their correct usage of these.

On 9/24/04, the first annual National Punctuation Day came about!

There is still an ongoing debate whether or not, Punctuation and even,

Spelling are current and relevant. Currently, with texting, few uses of

full sentences and other forms of communication, using ‘short-cuts,’

slang and abbreviations it may seem to be a ‘lost art.’ One that parents

and teachers alike, may just give up on!

 

But definitely not on September 24th!

 

Teachers usually like to be ‘sticklers’ for these since they were made to,

while young and in school. In college, there was a debate about the

Spelling book, whether lists to be memorized were worth the time and

sometimes crying children, who were just not born spellers. There are

a few natural spellers, a few natural history or social studies ‘geniuses,’

along with those who can understand all levels of mathematics, including

algebra and trigonometry. In each classroom, the strengths and weaknesses

are easily determined by testing, but sometimes figuring this out, may create

biases. We need to make all subjects of learning interesting and bring the

‘fascination’ back into each subject. Games can be played, along with other

means of making learning ‘hands on’ and more ‘experiential.’

 

One suggestion in Rubin’s request in how you may celebrate punctuation

is to get an old-fashioned newspaper and circle the punctuation forms, by

children. They may like taking a red crayon and circling all the commas, periods,

exclamation marks, colons and semi-colons. Adults may be excited to circle the

misspellings and the mistakes made in usage of punctuation.

 

I have seen misspellings in the schools listed on snow days and the political polls’

results shown below the television shows. I have heard poor grammar on t.v.

shows. It upsets me most when the newscasters use either poor grammar or

show a lack of understanding what they are reading on their teleprompter.

Mispronunciations occur across all levels of education, due to possibly lack

of using the dictionary and reading the way the words are supposed to be

pronounced.

 

The Huffington Post had a great article to celebrate this holiday last year,

9/24/13. It was called, “6 Common Punctuation Mistakes that Drive Us

Crazy.”

Here they are with no details given here, I see that I am over my 1000

words again… This article had me laughing out loud, they composed a

funny article and you must try to look it up:

“1. The misused apostrophe.

2. The ubiquitous exclamation marks.

3. The crazy comma.

4. The misplaced semi-colon.

5. The quotation marks.

6. The blurring of ‘text talk’ with real writing.”

 

 

Okay, not going into how, but  I am guilty of #s 2, 3 and 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating Kool-Aid in Nebraska

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In 1927, Edwin Perkins created the powdered flavored drink mix known as

Kool-Aid. It is now produced by Kraft Foods Company. The second weekend

of August, the town of Hastings, Nebraska celebrates its seventeenth year of

Aid Days.” The Festival has what is called “The World’s Largest Kool-Aid”

stand there. This is where you may pick up a free dated, reusable memorabilia

Souvenir Cup. This is refillable all day. You may also, purchase collectibles for

the 2014 event, online now.

There are all kinds of activities, fun things to do, a fair atmosphere with plenty

of food concession stands to celebrate Kool-Aid’s invention.

I liked using Kool-Aid for lunches, during the years I was a ‘stay at home/baby-

sitting’ Mom. I would always serve juice and milk for breakfast. Then, I would

serve milk again for my three kids, at dinner-time.

If there was anyone who brought something else to drink or share a beverage,

we would enjoy this variation. Occasionally, there were mothers who would

supply ‘juice boxes’ or jugs of lemonade, for our swimming pool outings, to save

money at the Mingo Pool Snack Bar. I would bring 8-10 snack baggies for all

the kids, including my 3.  There was always the drinking fountain, if thirsty.

I liked while growing up, visiting my neighbors or on overnight stays at  a

friend’s house, where Kool-Aid was served. To the best of my knowledge, we

never had any served at home. My parents were rather strict: water, milk or

juice, except on weekends. We would then have one bottle of Cotton Club

pop, with our pizza on Friday or our dinner on Saturday. Then, back to the

‘routine’ of drinking milk, juice or water on Sunday.

While traveling, my parents would bring instant coffee and Tang, the orange

juice concentrated powdered drink, along. My Dad liked to remind us that,

“Tang was what the astronauts drank up in Space!” We would have those little

boxes of cereal, that came in 8 or 10 packs, eating a box ‘dry’ with a cup of

Tang juice for breakfast. My parents would use the hot water from the tap

and make their instant coffee. We were used to this, our only special kind

of breakfast would be one time the whole week of vacation, we would head

to IHOP. We loved the International House of Pancakes! My co-workers

and I mentioned that there were so many of them, down South, less up

here in the North. I always chose this erudite dish of lemon butter crepes.

My brother, Randy, would have a stack of pancakes with boysenberry sauce,

while my brother, Ricky, would have eggs, bacon and toast with lots of butter

on it. My Dad was a fan of having every kind of food available for breakfast,

steak, eggs, pancakes or French toast, with grits and gravy on the side. My

Mom liked the crepes suzette with boysenberry or blueberry on it, with bacon.

I have wandered off Kool-Aid, but am meandering back. While on road trips,

my kids today bring those different instant single use packets that you add to

bottled water. They don’t make Kool-Aid nor do they usually serve sugared

juices, unless they are 100% juice, which is naturally sweetened. They serve

milk at 2-3 of the meals my grandchildren eat, although one of my little ones

has a lactose allergy and she gets almond milk, unsweetened with her meals.

 

As I am typing this, I think about those Kool-Aid packs in multiple colors

and flavors, “Just add one cup of sugar…” and it is ‘just pennies per serving.’

The song that they should play at the opening of the Kool-Aid Days Festival

should be, “Sugar, Sugar” by the Archies, from 1969!

 

Now, I cannot go any farther without asking, how many of you read,

“The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test,” book? This was written in 1968 by

Tom Wolfe.

How many of you used Kool-Aid to dye your hair?

What are your Kool-Aid memories?

Little Treasures

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Little bits and pieces of information come across my mind, that

may not compose a complete post. I enjoy sharing some of these

sources of inspiration, motivation and representations of three

areas of the Arts. One is in literature, one is a true story made into

a movie, and the last one is a belated tribute to a band member,

the last of his group to die. These special examples of writing, film

and music are ones that meant a lot to me. Hope you find a nugget

of gold, a treasure among this trio!

 

My youngest daughter had me check out a children’s book called,

“The Little Soul and the Sun!” I recommend your reading this to

your children, grandchildren or share it with your Sunday School

class teachers. It is a sweet book with the powerful message within

that it quite profound. I will share it with you, since you may wish

to know why this one is worth finding on Amazon, at your library,

or at Half Price Book Store. Neale Donald Walsch’s simple but pure

message lets you feel good about God. Walsch helps us to understand,

through the words he shares; that under all that we label, “Good” or

“Bad,” is love and understanding.

 

I think the actress, Taraji P. Henson, who portrays an African American

college golf coach, who served and helped young athletes for nearly two

decades, will be the one to watch in a movie being filmed.

The title of the movie is, “From the Rough.”

Her name is Taraji, which means “Hope,” in Swahili. Her middle name

is Penda, with means, “Love,” in Swahili. She has played a favorite

character, a police woman in the show, “Person of Interest,” along with

being in “Hustle and Flow,” “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,”

and other movies.

Who is she playing? The character in the movie is based on the college

men’s golf team at Tennessee State University for almost 20 years.

This amazing woman is Dr. Catana Starks, which was supposed to be

released in select movie theatres after April, 2014. Has anyone seen this

movie? I did not see it come to Columbus, unless I missed it while up

at my Mom’s over a Spring weekend…

I enjoy a movie about a woman who broke down class and traditions

with most golf coaches at college level being men. This movie will

motivate and inspire, which I may have to get at the library, since I

may have missed it at the theatres!

 

Even though it has been a couple of weeks since Tommy Ramone died,

I wanted to mention that the last of the “Ramones” band passed away.

Tommy quietly passed away of cancer’s after effects, on July 11, 2014.

The band members were not related, but all adopted the last name of

Ramone. Wasn’t that both funny and clever of them? They made it into

the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2002.

Their 80’s style “punk rock” includes a few songs I remember and

enjoyed including, Baby, I Love You” and “I Wanna Be Sedated.” They

were ones that when you analyze the lyrics, you may not like them.  I

don’t know why their catchy and driving music, had me singing along

with the Ramones! One  that my brother liked was, “Blitzkrieg Bop.”

The group started out in a garage in New York, made it to the top in

their own uniquely styled genre. They were quite popular in Europe and

around the world!

Gotta love that ingenuity and creativity, man!

Tommy Ramone was only 65. He was not even supposed to be in the

band! He took the place of someone who was trying to play the drums

and sing, to become one of the lead singers. I have written one other

post, with a short mention of the Ramones. I don’t wish to write a whole

article about them but wish to give a small tribute to the ones who felt

they were and changed their last names in respect for their

group. In the Ramones, they had three of the band members die of

cancer and one of heroin accidental overdose. None made it to 70 years

old.

It is a sad fact of some of the hard rockers and other band players, who

start out from simple roots, get ‘hooked’ into the culture of drugs and

partying, not to make it long in this life.

“Only the good die young…” (Billy Joel) reminds me of how long other

rockers have beaten the ‘odds’ and have kept on going. They must have

decided to exercise, cleanse and try for longevity.

 

Each of these ‘treasures’ could be considered to have been following

this quotation:

“If there is a faith that can move mountains,

it is the faith in one’s own power.”

By Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach, Austrian author.

 

Have you any recent news ‘treasures,’ you wish to share with us?