Category Archives: Yale University

Something different from loneliness

Standard

A life cut tragically short, by a car accident, holds meaning

and longevity. Marina Keegan, age 22, had just graduated only

five short days earlier from Yale University. Her promising

career had been jump started being hired by the magazine, “The

New Yorker.” She was soon to be considered a staff writer.

Marina’s family collected, posthumously, stories, essays and her

journal entries that ranged from serious subjects to silly ones.

Marina’s imagination created enough ‘life’s work,’ to publish in

a book called, “The Opposite of Loneliness.” (It has nine short

stories and nine essays.)

If you wish to read about her May 26, 2012 accident where she

and a young man’s car ‘rolled on Route 6,’ you can find an article

on the internet. Marina was from the town of Wayland, Massachusetts.

The article was posted in the “Cape Cod Today” newspaper. The book

has a forward written by one of Marina’s Yale professors, Anne

Fadiman.

One of Marina’s profound thoughts on the subject of her book,

(which I hope that in the after life one knows that you are

a published author!) was that the English language doesn’t

exactly have a word that is the opposite of loneliness.

While Marina was alive she showed her buoyancy and happiness

to others surrounding her. She mentioned that there was

enjoyment in togetherness. There are other facets in this

collection that sound ‘wiser than her age.’ Her question

that resonated with me was:

“What inhabits the place in your ‘soul’ that is the complete

opposite of loneliness?”

This book is worthy of reading and inspiring to see what

Marina’s thoughts were. Also, to imagine all the words still

left to be said, had she lived past her 22nd year. It seemed to

me, if one could picture a bulletin board with a collage of

pictures that represented her thoughts, it would be very exciting

and beautiful. It would have love and heartbreak, whales and

music. She had written a play that Yale actors had performed in

called, “Utility Monster.” She was in the middle of writing a

musical.

The job that was waiting for her at “The New Yorker,” indicates

what a fine student and someone who must have made a quite a

remarkable first impression.

Marina’s family should take comfort that she must have felt some

of her dreams had come to fruition. There must have been excitement

and a sense of anticipation at that ‘first job’ after college.

Another part of the book made me feel that no one should count

on having a tomorrow. Think big! Think outside the box! My

thoughts kept coming back to Marina would have made an excellent

author to read, her stories and essays are vibrant and meaningful.

Her volumes of thoughts, hand written in notebooks and journals

show her commitment to writing. Her mind lived in ‘worlds’ where

others may never have tread.

Makes me appreciate that I still am here.

We all should remember how short and fleeting our lives are.

Time is flying by, our clocks possibly already ‘set’ to the

last minute we will have a chance to say something, in our

words and through our writings.

In a short 3 line poem that in is the Preface of Marina’s

book, these words are given:

“Bygones

Do you wanna’ leave soon?

No, I want enough time to be in love with everything.

And, I cry because everything is so beautiful

And so short.”